Compiled @ April 21 2014 16:25:28.

Topic: Welcome to grandMA2 series control system v2.x..

Topic: Welcome to the grandMA2 manual.

This guide will help you getting around the grandMA2 manual.

The most important question is: Why are you here? The goal with this guide is to point you in the right direction no matter what your answer to that question is.

This page might guide you a new page asking more question. If you feel the questions about something completely different, it might be that you need to go one page back and use a different answer - it might also be that this guide is guiding you in the slightly wrong direction or you have come up with a whole new question. If you feel something is wrong or you are missing something please let us know. And using this on the console, you might have an old manual, and you might want to update the manual - you can get some help on installing a new manual using this page.

It's also worth noticing the Version number in the upper right corner of each page (okay, some might be missing them - but most pages). This tells you when the page was last edited. So you will find pages edit some version ago, this might mean that there has been no changes - but it might also mean that you have found something that the manual team haven't updated yet. SO if this is the case don't hesitate to tell us. It's a very big manual and something might have slipped away from our attention.

The online manual also have a working index. Here you can browse through an alphabetical list of pages.

To read about the lates changes go to the ReleaseNotes.

The guide pages offer you a lot of reading. You might want to skip some of it (and that's fine), but we promise you, IF you read it all, you'll learn a lot about this manual and the grandMA2!

Where should you begin.

Okay, one of the first questions you should answer is it following:

Are you looking for...

...help with a specific command or word (like: Cue, Goto or Macro)?

  • If you want to find the command or word your self, you can go to the "Reference -> Commandline" section. Here you can find descriptions of all the keywords and commands in the console. If you need further guidance you can go to the Commandline guide.

... help trying to find out, how a specific key is working?

  • If you want to navigate to descriptions of the console keys, you can go to the "Reference -> Key & Buttons" section. If you need further help you can go to the Keys & Buttons guide.

... what a window or menu does or what a pop-up means?

  • The "Reference -> Windows" section can help you with all the windows, menus and pop-ups on the console. Go to Windows Guide for further help.

... a step by step tutorial/guide?

  • The "Tutorial" section gives you step by step guides to some of the functions in the grandMA2. Go to Tutorial Guide for further help.

... an example on how to solve a specific task?

  • The "Task" section gives you task examples on some of the functions in the grandMA2. Go to the Task Guide for further guidance.

... learning more about the philosophy behind the grandMA2?

  • The "Concept" area can give you an insight on the grandMA2 philosophy. Go to the Concept Guide for further help.

... something about networking with the grandMA2?

  • There are many different pages about networking. Go to the Network Guide for further help.

... something about the grandMA NPU?

  • There are different pages and sections about the NPU. Go to the NPU Manual Guide for further help.

...pages that's updated to the newest version?

  • Then you can try to search for V[main version]x[sub version] (e.g. V2x1).

The hope and goal is that you can ansver yes to at lest one of the questions above.

If this isn't the case, you could try to browse the manual or formulate your question on ma-share.net - maybe another user can point you in the right direction.

And if you would like the manual writing team to add some guide info, you can contact us using this contact form. You won't get any responds but serious suggestions will be appreciated :-)

Topic: Command and keywords guide

This guide will point you in the right direction, when you are trying to get help about commands and keywords.

All right, you need some help about commands or keywords.

This might be the right place for you, but if the following isn't what you where looking for you might want to take a step back and see if there's one of the other sections that might fit you better.

But to return to the commands. The grandMA2 is a command line console - This means that the command line is the fundamental way to communicate with the console. Many of the buttons and function available to you is in fact tools that help you enter the correct commands.

There are many commands and keywords, and in the manual they are divided into "common" and "Special" keywords.

The common keywords are mostly the commands you can access by pressing one of the hardkeys on the console (like "Edit"), but there's also some of the keywords used for other common operations (like "PresetType").

The special keywords are commands that are useful for crating macros (like "SetVar"), commands working in the background (like "Call") or commands used to control the function of the console (like "Reboot").

But there's no real definition about where a keyword is found, so be sure to check both - you might also discover something new :-)

Just tell me where to go!

Okay, take a look at these next questions:

Are you looking for a explanation on a specific command or keyword?

  • Then you shoul go to the Keywords listing in the Syntax section

Are you trying to find out what a hardkey is doing?

Are you creating a macro and need help?

  • There are many manual pages about macro creation. Go to this Macro Guide for further help.

Do you need to know more about the grandMA2 syntax?

  • The grandMA2 syntax is very comprehensive. There are two good places: The Commandline Concept pages that contains a more general description and the Commandline Syntax pages that gives you a detailed explanation.

None of the above is what I am looking for...

  • Okay, maybe you should try to go back to the Guide Front Page, and see if there's an other answer that fits you better. If there's nothing that helps you, you could send a comment to the manual team using this form, and get us to add the guide info. Please be as specific as possible.

Topic: Hardkeys and buttons guide

This guide will point you in the right direction when you need help with keys and buttons on the console.

There's only one place to look if you need help about the keys and buttons on the console. It's the Keys & Buttons reference section.

But if you're looking for something else - the following questions might help you. And again if you didn't find what you where looking for, you can send a comment to the manual team using this form. Please be specific with what you think is missing.

Are you looking for a command that can't be accessed with the hardkeys?

Are you trying to learn more about executors?

Is this not what you where looking for?

Topic: Windows guide

If you are looking for information about a window, menu or pop-up, this guide will help you.

Many windows allow you to press the Help key followed by pressing in the window, to open a help pop-up describing that window.

There's an entire section dedicated to describe all the windows, menus and pop-ups. It's the Windows reference section.

The windows description is divided into different areas. Many of the window descriptions also have links to other relevant pages.

Look through the following question for further direction.

Are you looking for help on any of the window you can create with the Create Basic Window pop-up?

Have you gotten a pop-up you don't understand?

Have you encountered an error or warning pop-up, and need help?

Are you looking for help on how to create views?

None of this is what you where looking for?

Topic: Tutorial guide

The step by step tutorials mey help you with many question about general use or a more specific use.

As of this writing there's 9 different tutorials. They can be seen in the tutorial section. The first two are basic tutorial that deals with most of the common actions on the grandMA2. The next tutorials deal with more specific actions on the console.

The tutorials are step by step guides that work best if you follow the descriptions very tight. If you are more into examples of how to use the console, you might also find a lot of useful info in the Task section.

If this isn't what you are looking for you could try to go back to the Guide Front Page and see if there's an other answer that might suit you better.

If you feel that there's a tutorial missing, feel free to write a comment to the manual team using the contact form. Please be specific with what you are missing.

Topic: Task guide

There are many tasks that can help you understand how the grandMA2 works.

The tasks are divided in to two different sections, each with sub sections.

There's the Hardware section. This has most to do with connecting peripheral equipment.

The other section is the Software section. Here you can find all sorts of tasks about Updating, Setup, programming and Software connections.

Read the following questions for the right direction.

Do you need to know how to connect something to the console?

Are you looking for other task regarding the console hardware?

Do you need help with installing or updating the software?

Do you need help with software or show setup on your console?

Do you need help something about programming a show?

Are you looking for help with networking?

Are you trying to create a macro?

Where you looking for a step by step tutorial / guide?

None of this is what you where looking for?

Topic: Concept guide

The concept section is meant to give you a basic understanding about a subject.

There are some pages about the grandMA2 philosophy and how some parts of the console works.

The concept pages are divided into three sections called Basic Operation, System Setup & Extended Operation. Basic and extended operation are the most comprehensive sections (as of this writing).

There are many different operations on a grandMA2 and not every operation is described, but the concept section will grow in the future.

The adwise to you, is that you browse through the three sections mentioned above to see if what you are looking for is described yet. If you don't find what you where looking for, we suggest that you write a comment to the manual team using this form and let us know what you are missing. Please be as specific as possible.

If this isn't what you where looking for, I suggest you go back to the Manual Guide front page and try a different path.

Topic: Network guide

Networking is an essential part of grandMA2. This guide will help you find what you are looking for.

Networking is a lot of things. The following will point you in the right direction.

There's a page about the concept behind the grandMA2 networking. Find it here. When dealing with networking it's also worth mentioning something about multiuser. This is a link to the multiuser concept.

If you are looking for information about connecting a network cable - follow this link.

There's a task about setting the IP address - follow this link.

There's a lot of commands and keywords relevant for networking. This is some of them: InviteStation (IS), JoinSession (JS), DisconnectStation (DS), LeaveSession (LS), NetworkInfo (NI), SetIP.

There's also a description of the setup menus network section. This might also provide you with a lot of information.

If you need something that you didn't find here, you are welcome to write a comment to the manual team using this form. Please be as specific as possible. If this isn't what you where looking for, you can try to go back to the Manual Guide front page and try a different path.

Topic: Macro guide

Macros are a very powerful part of grandMA2. This guide will help you find what you need for creating macros.

Generally it's a good idea to know all the commands needed to create the macro - but then I guess you didn't need the guide :-)

If you are in any doubts about the commands you need, you should look at the Commandline guide.

One of the most important commands when trying to create a macro and not really sure about the correct syntax is List.

For general information about the macro philosophy in grandMA2, you should have a look at the Macro Concept.

If you are new to macros, you might want to have a go at the Macro Tutorial. Here you are presented with the most common steps to create macros. And it's very recommendable to go through this first.

If you are looking at using macros you might want to take a look at the Macro Tasks. Here you'll find some tasks about using macros.

The Macro Editor window, describes how to use this dialog to create macros. Here you can also see how to create predefined macros.

If you are trying to find info on how to import or export macros you can find it here.

The last place I'm going to tell you about is the Macro Keyword. This just tells you how to use the keyword.

Looking at the pages linked above will give you answers to many questions about macros. Should you have something you didn't find, please write a comment to the manual team using the contact form, and we will try to add the info here.

If this wasn't what you where looking for you could try to go back to the Manual Guide front page and try a different path.

Topic: NPU manual guide

This manual guide help you locate pages in the manual about grandMA NPU's.

This NPU manual guide will hopefully guide you in the right direction when you are looking for help with the grandMA NPU.

If you are not looking for anything about the grandMA NPU you should try to go back to the Guide Front Page, and see if there's something else that fits you better.

If there's nothing below here that helps you, you could send a comment to the manual team using this form, and tell us what you think is missing. Please be as specific as possible.

Tasks.

There are tasks describing the most common actions regarding the grandMA NPU.

There are some task regarding setting up the hardware.

The software tasks are divided into using the NPU in Series 1 Mode or Series 2 Mode.

And there's also a separate task about updating the software.

Windows.

All the windows and screens on the NPU (in Series 2 Mode) are described in the NPU windows section. But you might also want to have a look at the MA Network Configuration - NPU in the Setup Menu. This is used for setting the DMX ports on the NPU.

Tutorial.

There's a NPU Tutorial taking you though the steps needed to set up a NPU in a MA system.

Commands.

After the initial setup of the NPU it works very much in the background. But there are some commands that can help you adding and dismissing NPU's to the network. NetworkInfo, InviteStation and DisconnectStation.

Specifications.

If you need the specifications on the NPU, have a look here.

Topic: grandMA2 Series.

grandMA2 Series - more than a console

With the grandMA, MA Lighting started a new era of highly developed lighting and visual control console platforms. On the one hand, these consoles can be used for stand-alone lighting control, on the other, they can work via Ethernet (MA-Net) as an integrated MA system network.

With the introduction of the grandMA2, MA Lighting took the next logical step. Offering vastly more powerful software and hardware, this series is again setting standards for the years to come.

The grandMA2 hardware may also be used with full compability and functionality of the series1 software.

For using the grandMA2 in compatibility mode, please refer to the latest grandMA series1 manual.

.

Topic: Copyright & Disclaimer

Declaration of Conformity according to directives 2004 / 108 / EG

Manufacturer's name MA Lighting Technology GmbH
Manufacturer's address Dachdeckerstr. 16 D-97297 Waldbuttelbrunn Germany

declares that the product.

Product category Control unit
Name of product grandMA2 fullsize , grandMA2 light, grandMA2 ultra-light, grandMA2 wing
. .

complies with the following product specifications:

Safety EN60065, EN60950-1
EMV (EMC) EN55103-1:2009 (E1), EN55103-2:2009 (E2)
Additional information: DMX512, Ethernet, USB, MAlink, DVI, LTC, Audio IN, MIDI and analogue inputs must be shielded and the shielding must be connected to the earthing resp. to the housing of the corresponding plug.

Dipl. Ing. Michael Adenau

Copyright 2002-2012 MA Lighting Technology GmbH

The reproduction and distribution of the documentation and software and the use of its contents is subject to written authorization from MA Lighting Technology GmbH.

Trademarks

Windows XP ®, Windows Vista ®, and Microsoft ® are registered trademarks of Microsoft, Corp. All other names mentioned may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Concept: About the Manual

grandMA2 Help System introduction

The grandMA2 Help system will eventually be available on the console by pressing Help Please.

These pages are also available online at www.grandma2.de/help

With each software-release, the latest version of the online pages is included in the console, however as the online version is constantly updated, expanded and refined, based on userfeedback from the grandMA2-forum and experiences from the software-team, the online-version may be slightly different from what you find inside your console.

Concepts

"What is .... ?". Concepts contains background information you should know to successfully work with the grandMA2 series consoles.

This section aims to give you a conceptual understanding of the philosophy behind the console, without digging deep into every little detail. With a conceptual understanding, you will have the knowledge needed to understand the technical information and facts found in the reference section.

Reference

The Reference section contains technical information - facts, descriptions and properties of each elements of the console.

This section is intended for look-up and reference, to expand the basic knowledge gained by the concept section

Tasks

"How do I .... ?" Allthough the concept and reference section should provide you with enough information to operate the console, the exact steps of some Tasks may not be obvious for all users.

This section contains step-by-step instruction for common tasks and procedures.

Tutorials

This section provides tutorials intended for training. While Tasks contains step-by-step instruction for single operations, the tutorials will guide you thru different scenarios from A-Z.

Reference: Basic terminology

Please refer to the Reference section for further descriptions of terms

Fixtures
Instruments, Luminaires, - devices controlled by the console
Channels
Fixtures that has been given a Channel-ID - usually a fixture with dimmer only
Attribute
Controllable functions of a fixture, e.g. pan or gobowheel3
Parameter
A specific attribute of a specific fixture, e.g tilt of fixture 5
Selection
A collection of fixtures, selected and ready for manual control
Activation
A collection of parameters, active and ready for storing
Programmer
The container for Selection, Activation and temporary parameter-values,
Parameter-values
Parameter-content in the form of Level/Value, Fade, Delay and/or Effect
Cue
A look on stage, stored within a Sequence
Sequence
A series of cues that run in a specific order. Other consoles may call this a Cue-list
Executor
A handle used to control and execute stored content, e.g a sequenceOther consoles may call this a Playback or Master
Store
Create data (i.e. a cue) in the showfile. Other consoles may call this function Record
Preset
A stored parameter setting, for easy access and reuse. Other consoles may call this a Palette
Effect
An overlayed table (e.g Sinus) that modulates the value of a parameter. Basic controls would be Table, Size, Speed and relative offset.

Concept: System Overview

Members of the grandMA2 family

grandMA2 full-size

grandMA2 light

grandMA2 ultra-light

grandMA2 onPC command wing

grandMA2 faderwing

grandMA2 replay unit

MA NPU

grandMA2 onPC

Reference: Console Geography

  1. Screen 1 (Commandscreen)
  2. Screen 2
  3. Screen 3 (light & full-size)
  4. Screen 4 (full-size)
  5. Window Encoders
  6. Attribute Encoders
  7. Level Wheel - Dimmer - (light & full-size)
  8. Trackball - Pan/Tilt & Mouse
  9. Grand Master
  10. Fader Executors
  11. Button Executors
  12. Multipurpose User-keys ("X-keys")
  13. Main Executor
  14. Command Area
  15. Keyboard (light & fullsize)
  16. View/Viewpage Buttons
  17. Menu Keys
  18. Power Key

Reference: Backpanels

Consoles

  1. Mains Switch
  2. Mains Input, PowerCon NAC3MPA, 120-230V 50/60Hz 350VA
  3. DMX Out A-F, 6 x XLR 5pin male
  4. DMX In, XLR 5pin female
  5. Ethernet 1+2, 2 x EtherCon RJ-45 10/100/1000 Base T-X
  6. External Monitor Left+Right, 2 x DVI-I Dual-Link
  7. DC Remote Input / pin configuration: DB-25 female, pin 1-16 = input, pin 21 and 22 = +5V, pin 24 and 25 =common ground
  8. MA-Link, DA-15 female
  9. USB, 2 x TypeA USB 2.0
  10. MIDI In+Out, 2 x DIN 5/180 female
  11. Audio In, XLR 3pin female, min 20mV
  12. LTC/SMPTE In, XLR 3pn female, min 200mV
  13. Reset Button
  14. Desklamp Outputs, 2 x XLR 4pin female, MA LED desklamp 4pin

OnPC command wing

  1. Mains Switch + Input, IEC C14, 90-240V 50/60Hz 42VA
  2. USB, TypeB USB 2.0
  3. LTC/SMPTE In, XLR 3pn female, min 200mV
  4. DMX In, XLR 5pin female
  5. DC Remote Input / pin configuration: DA-15 female . pin 1-6,9-14 = input, pin 7 = +5V, pin 14 = common ground
  6. MIDI In+Out, 2 x DIN 5/180 female
  7. DMX Out A+B, 2 x XLR 5pin male

OnPC fader wing

  1. Mains Switch + Input, IEC C14, 90-240V 50/60Hz 42VA
  2. USB/PC, TypeB USB 2.0
  3. USB/CMD, TypeA USB 2.0
  4. USB/PWR, TypeA USB +5V only (Desklamp)
  5. DMX Out A-D, 4 x XLR 5pin male

Concept: grandMA2 philosophy

Concepts & philosophy of the grandMA2 series consoles

This section provide background information you should know to successfully work with the grandMA2 series consoles.

For step-by-step instructions for common tasks, and reference documentation of each element of the system, please look at the Tasks and Reference sections.

Concept: Basic Operation

Click on any of the sub topics for more info on the Basic Operation.

Concept: Attributes

Every fixture/channel has a minimum of one, but possibly multiple parameters to be controlled. These parameters are classified as Attributes, and may be adjusted and manipulated via the Encoder Toolbar , once the fixtures are selected.

A generic dimmer typically has only one attribute - "Dimmer" while an advanced Moving Light may have 30+ different attributes. To effectivly work with a high number of attributes, Attributes are grouped in Features, which again are grouped in Preset-types.

Example:

A fixtures's parameter for rotating the gobos on the second gobowheel, would be the Attribute "Gobo2 Rot", of the Feature "Gobo2" of the Preset-type "Gobo"

A fixtures's parameter for adjusting its intensity, would be the Attribute "Dimmer", of the Feature "Dimmer" of the Preset-type "Dimmer"

Accessing attributes

The top row of the Encoder Toolbar will display one button for each Preset-type existing in your Showfile. Pressing this button puts the attributes of the first feature, on your encoders. If the Preset-type contains multiple features, or more than 4 attributes per feature, these amy be accessed via the leftmost button in the second row.

Adjusting attributes

The encoders have three basic functions:

Encoder Turn
Value adjustment up/down
Encoder Push&Turn
Fast value adjustment up/down
Encoder Click
Open dialog for numeric entry, predefined slot-values or attribute options

Special attributes

Some attributes and features have dedicated controls to enable faster and/or easier access to adjustments

The most obvious is the level wheel next to the numeric keypad, which is allways linked to the dimmer attribute, and the Trackball which is linked to Pan&Tilt, unless it is in Mouse-mode.

Additionally some features like Colormix and Shapers have grahical tools on the multitouch commandscreen.

Concept: Backup

With backup you can save and load your show. You can also change settings for a file server, an automatic saving interval and save the show to external drives.

Concept: Channels & Fixtures

Devices to control; Channels & Fixtures

The grandMA2 is a versatile control system, there are no predefined limitation of what type of fixtures it does control, e.g. "this desk controls 200 dimmers and 48 moving lights". With grandMA2 all fixtures to be controlled are defined in Setup Show , by the user.

Every fixture needs an identifier (ID) . grandMA2 has two different types/ranges of such, Channel ID & Fixture ID.

Channel

A fixture with a Channel ID will display its dimmer-attribute in the Channel Sheet window. Channel IDs are typically used with devices that only have one controllable parameter - Dimmer.

Fixture

A fixture with a Fixture ID will display all its attributes in the Fixture Sheet window. Fixture IDs are typically used with fixtures that have multiple controllable parameters - pan/tilt, color, gobo etc.

ID

A fixture must have either a Channel ID or a Fixture ID, - or both. Some operators prefer to give every fixture both the same Channel and Fixture ID, to be able to select number 5, not caring about if it is a Channel or a Fixture, while others prefer to separate and distinguish between the two types of fixtures. e.g Channel 5 (dimmer 5) is another fixture than Fixture 5 (Mac600 #5). A fixture can also have different Channel and Fixture IDs. This may be useful in situations where the designer would like to call fixtures by its location: Channel 35 (5th position on third truss), while the operator prefer to think of the fixture as first mac600, Fixture 601.

Subfixtures

In the later years, there has been an increase in products which actually are multiple fixtures in one housing, e.g. LED-battens, where you have multiple cells, and each cell has individual control of RGB. Such fixtures may be patched as one fixture, but nevertheless be accessed individually as Subfixtures. If a Thomas Pixel-line is patched and given the ID Fixture 5, merely selecting fixture 5 would adjust all 18 cells of this fixture. To adjust only cell #13, you select Fixture 5.13

Concept: Commandline

The command line is the fundamental way of communication between the console and the operator.

By the use of reserved words, keywords, and numerical identifiers, the operator may command the desk to perform any task, e.g Delete Effect 3 or Goto Cue 5. Every commandline has to be completed with the magic word Please, so the exact buttons to push for these examples would be Del Effect 3Please and Goto Cue 5 Please .

Please is not a keyword or part of the commandline, it is the button that sends the commandline to the console, so remember to be polite and add Please to any commandline examples you find in these pages.

Most commonly used keywords have a dedicated labeled key, while others may be accessed by a second (or third) press of the key. Some keywords may only be available from onscreen buttons, while all keywords may be typed manually with the keyboard.

You may always see what is currently being typed into the commandline, by looking at the teal-colored Commandline Input field displayed on both the command screen and the right monitor-wing screen:

[Channel]>Delete Group 4

Like in any language, words may be classified into different groups (i.e. verbs and nouns), and there are rules on how words may be combined, to form understandable expressions.

Object Keywords

Object Keywords are used in the commandline to reference objects in your showfile. Examples of object keywords could be Channel, Fixture, Effect, Preset. These keywords represent object-types, and are typically used together with a number/ID or a name/label, to point to specific objects: Channel 3, Fixture 10, Effect 4, Preset "Red".

Object keywords may be compared to nouns in human languages.

Functional Keywords

Functional Keywords are used in the commandline to perform a task or function. Examples of functional keywords could be Goto, Delete, LeaveSession. Functional keywords are often followed by an object, that the function/task should be applied to: Goto Cue 3, Delete Preset "Blue". Some functions are global and does not need an object as argument, e.g. Blackout.

Functional keywords may be compared to verbs in human languages.

Helping Keywords

Helping Keywords are used in the commandline to give relations to functions and objects. Examples of helping keywords could be At, Thru : Copy Cue 3 At Cue 5, Delete Effect 4 Thru 6.

Helping keywords may be compared to prepositions and conjunctions in human languages

General Syntax

The general syntax is [Function] [Object], or more specific [Function] [Object-type] [Object-IDs], however to speed up programming, parts of this syntax may be omitted, and will be replaced with default values by the console:

Store Cue 3 may be typed as Store 3 , as Cue is the default object-type for the function Store

Go+Macro 5 may be typed as Macro 5 , as Go+ is the default function for the object-type Macro

Capitalization & Abbrevations

The console does not distinguish between upper/lower case in keywords, this form is used merely to improve readability. Additionally, when entering commandline with a keyboard, it is inconvenient to have to type the whole keyword, so every keyword may be shortened to it's unique letter-combination

Store Cue 3 may via the keyboard be typed as st cu 3

Macro 10 may via the keyboard be typed as ma 10

Default keyword

To speed up programming even more, the commandline has a default object keyword, which will be inserted if you start your commandline directly with a number. The default keyword is displayed in square brackets the start of the commandline:

[Channel]>

typing just 9 will generate Channel 9, as Channel is currently the default keyword/object of the commandline.

[Channel]>Channel 9

You may change this default keyword at any time, by entering the keyword and then press please.

Fixture Please

[Fixture]>

Command line overwrite

When you edit the command in a macro or if you are adding or editing a command in a cue you'll get a pop-up that overwrites the command line input. When a pop-up like this overwrites the normal commandline, it gets a red background like this:

You will see that what you type or what hardkeys you press go to the red background colored command line and into the pop-up. When you press Please the pop-up will close and the commandline will empty and go back to the original color.

Pressing an executor buttons will take the action from the button directly into the pop-up and return the commandline to normal mode.

Concept: Cues & Sequences

A look on stage may be stored as a Cue.

Fixture parameters adjusted to different values, together form "looks" on stage, which may be memorized by the console as Cues.

Cues are organized in Sequences, and are played back by Executors. - A simple analogy would be that your Cue is a song/track, the Sequence is an Album/CD, and your Executor is your CD/DVD player.

This means that you cannot have a Cue without a Sequence, and you cannot use your Cue/Sequence without assigning it to an Executor. Sounds complicated, but this process is automated. If you press Store then any button of an empty Executor, the console will automatically create a new sequence, assign the sequence to your executor, and add first cue, Cue 1.

In addition to contain values for each included parameter, a Cue also includes properties for when and how to recall the cue, like Trigger source/time, Fade and Delay times etc.

A cue may further be divided into Parts , to apply different timing to groups of fixtures or parameters.

Concept: Effects

Effects are dynamic values generated by repeatably alternating between two different values according to a given waveform.

The output-value of any attributes may be dynamically generated by applying two values (low and high) and a wave-form/graph, where the bottom of the graph represents the low value, the top of the graph represents the high value, and the transition between these two values is defined by the shape of the graph:

With the means of these three parameters, the output-value will start oscillating at the given rate:

Furthermore by aligning the phase , where to start on the curve, you may achieve a continuous flow:

Effect-values may be stored directly into your cues as discrete effect-values, or to the Effect-pool as a Selective Effect for referenced reuse, similar to how static values may be stored and reused via Presets.

Effect-values may be manipulated by selecting the corresponding Effect-layer via the Layer select buttons above your encoders:

Form
Form is the form/graph defining the transition between the High and the Low value, e.g. Sin or Ramp
Rate
Rate is the relative speed/time used to complete one cycle
Low
Low is the value used when the form/graph is at the bottom
High
High is the value used when the form/graph is at the top
Phase
Phase defines where (horisontally) on the form/graph to start, 0=beginning, 360=end
Width
Width controls how much the form/graph should occupy of a full cycle. A 'Width' of 100% makes the form take up all the cycle. If the 'Width' is only 50% then the form only occupies the first half of the cycle
Fade
Fade is an optional individual fade-time, used when effect is stored into cues
Delay
Delay is an optional individual delay-time, used when effect is stored into
Attack
Attack is used to soften the transition from low to high of the special Forms PWM, Chase and Random
Decay
Decay is used to soften the transition from high to low of the special Forms PWM, Chase and Random
ID
ID is a non-editable layer which will display the ID of either the Template or Selective Effect the values originates from (from which button in the effect pool the values are startet).

Concept: Executor

Executors are handles used to control and execute stored content.

The most obvious use for an executor is to assign a sequence of cues for playback, however executors may also be used as handles for other objects, e.g. a physical button of a specific macro or a speedfader for a group of chasers.

Executors are arranged in Pages. This enables you to easy get a new set of executors merely by changing page.

Changing page will not load new content into your physical Executors, like on some other consoles. Changing page just instructs the console to display another set of Executors on your physical hardware. This enables you to have executors from multiple pages active and running at once.

There are two types of executors, Fader Executors and Button Executors.

Fader Executors

Fader Executors have 4 controls: one fader and 3 buttons (2 above fader, one below). Depending on console type and wings attached, you may have direct physical access to up to 90 Fader Executors at once. These Executors are labeled from 1 and up.

Button Executors

Button Executors have only one control: a button. Depending on console type and wings attached, you may have direct physical access to up to 110 Button Executors at once. These Executors are labeled from 101 and up

Soft Executors

Even if your hardware-setup do not support 90 + 110 physical Executors, you may still access and use all 200, via onscreen faders and buttons.

Button and Fader functions

The function of each button and fader of an Executor may be freely assigned, to suit the needs for your style of operating, type of show, and functionallity of assigned object.

Typical button functions could be Go, Pause or Flash, while fader function could be Master (intensity), Speed or Crossfade.

Concept: Groups

Groups are collections of fixtures, used for selection.

Commonly used combinations of fixtures may be stored as Groups.

To create a group, select the desired fixtures, e.g Channel 1 Thru 5 - 4 then enter Store Group 3 .

Channel 1, 2 3 and 5, may now be selected by just entering Group 3 .

Multiple Groups may be combined in one commandline, also with the Channel and Fixture keyword. i.e. Group 1 Thru 4 - Channel 3 + Fixture 7

Groups are merely shortcuts for selecting fixtures:

Group 5 At 50 , Store Cue 3 will set the fixtures in Group 5 to 50%, not Group 5 to 50, so any later changes to Group 5 will not be reflected in Cue 3.

Your groups are displayed in the Group Pool Window.

With the Group Pool window, you can select groups merely by pressing the tile in the pool, - and create groups, by pressing Store in advance.

Groups also remember the order of the selection. Fixture 1 + 2 is not exactly the same as Fixture 2 + 1. The order of a selection is important when applying effects and value-ranges, which will be distributed along the selection

Concept: Labeling

Every object in your showfile may be given descriptive names/labels to eliminate the need to remember numbers. .

Giving Names

The command for labeling is Label [Object] , - the Label keyword is access by pressing two times on the Assign key, so the exact keystrokes for giving group 3 a name, would be Assign Assign Group 3 Please, and then enter the name in the popup dialog.

If you are labeling a pool-object (i.e a group), and the pool and the object has focus (white square around the object), you can enter a new label just by start typing with the keyboard.

This Direct labeling of object with focus, enables you to enter the name directly after selecting or storing via pool-windows.

Direct labeling also work in the Cue-lists when focus is on the cue-name.

Using Names

In addition to being informative when displaying data in pools and sheets, names may also be used in the commandline to access the objects.

[Channel]>Group Pars At 50

Sets group "pars"to 50%. If the name includes white-space or reserved words (keywords), the name must be enclosed in quotes Group "All Macs" At 50 .

Concept: Presets

A preset holds information about attribute-values for a selection of fixtures, and may be referenced and re-used in cues. The value of a preset in the programmer or stored in a cue is labelled with a cyan bar.

The idea of Presets is to store a labeled reference in a cue, rather than the actual value itself.

Example:

After positioning Fixture 1 thru 3 at the Piano, rather than storing the actual pan&tilt attributevalues into the cue, these values are stored as Preset "Piano" and the Cue only contains that fixture 1 thru 3 should point at "Piano".

The advantage of this concept is that if the piano (or fixtures) is moved, you only have to update the Preset "Piano" even if you have used the fixtures at this position in multiple cues. Another surplus is that in your fixturesheet you may see that pan and tilt is at Piano, and not just a numeric value or deflection in degrees.

Preset types

Presets are divided into different types, each by default collecting related attributes. e.g. Pan, Tilt belong to the Preset-type Position, while ColorWheel and CMY belong to the Preset-type Color etc.

Concept: Programmer

Your current Selection of fixtures, and the values of any manually adjusted attributes resides in the Programmer

Active parameters

Active parameters are displayed in the fixture and channel Sheet with a dark red background. By default when creating/storing Cues and Presets, the console will take the Active parameters.

Parameters gets automatically activated when you adjust them in the programmer. For convenience the console will also activate related parameters, so if you adjust the attribute Pan, then Tilt will also be included.

Layers

A parameter's data is divided into multiple Layers. These Layers are divided into two main groups, Value Layers and Effect Layers.

With the Layer select buttons centrally located above your encoders, you may choose which layers you are working on.

The Value layers consist of 3 layers

Values
this is the normal static value of the parameter
Fade
This is an optional fadetime for the value. if no fadetime is given, the parameter will follow cuetiming
Delay
This is an optional delaytime for the value. if no delaytime is given, the parameter will foolow cue-timing

The Effect layers consist of 11 layers

These layers define a dynamic value for the parameter. Learn more about what each layer does via the concept and tutorial pages for Effects

Concept: Selection

To be able to adjust and manipulate fixtures, they need to be selected

Selecting via commandline

Selecting may be done with the commandline by i.e. pressing Fixture 5 Please . Multiple fixtures may be selected in one go by using the helping keywords +, - and Thru, e.g. Channel 2 Thru 10 - 4

To see your current selection onscreen, you need a Channel Sheet and/or Fixture Sheet window. Selected fixtures will have their name and number (ID) displayed with yellow text.

If your sheets are not large enough to display all fixtures, enable Fixture Sort in the top right corner, to move the selected fixtures to the top of the list

Selecting via GUI

With a Channel Sheet or Fixture Sheet window visible, you may select fixtures merely by touching their name or ID-number. Selecting a range is done with a "lasso": press on first fixture, move finger/mouse to last fixture, then release. To deselect via the GUI, press the - (minus) key first, then the name/ID in the sheet.

Cancel current selection

To de-select all selected fixtures press the Clear key once.

Concept: Touchscreens / GUI

The 9" and 15.4" touchscreens of grandMA2 forms a powerful userdefined GUI (Graphical User Interface)

The multiple screens on the grandMA are used both to display informational data to the user and also via their touch functionally, to produce input to the console.

The grey areas with light grey dots are the areas where user-definded windows may be arranged

Commandscreen

The bottom section of this screen contains label and softbuttons for the X-keys. The X-keys can control Button Executors, (List) or Views/Macros (User1 + 2). Additionally these act as hardkeys for options in pop-ups, menus and dialogs.

Right Screen

The bottom section of this screen contains the Encoder Toolbar which gives access to fixture attributes and object properties. In the bottom left corner is the Executor-label for the currently selected (Main) executor. Along the right hand side is 10 View-buttons for easy recall of different userdefined Window-arrangements

Left/Middle Screen (fullsize and light)

The bottom section of this screen contains the labels for the Fader and Button Executors. Along the right hand side is 10 View-buttons for easy recall of different userdefined Window-combinations

Concept: Tracking

Tracking is the principle to just memorize the changes from one cue to the next..

Rather than taking a complete snapshot from stage for each cue, a tracking console will put just the values into a cue which differ from the previous look. This follows the way a designer would think about his cues as well as it saves console's processing power and memory.

Quite simply, tracking is the idea that once a parameter is set to a level, it stays there until it is told to go somewhere else.

e.g.

The actual content of Cue 2 is just to turn on the frontlight, - Cue 2 does not contain any data for the backdrop. However, when playing back Cue 2, the blue backdrop will stay on, and the result, the state of Cue 2, becomes guitarplayer with a blue background. The blue background is tracking to the next cue.

Concept: Views and Windows

What you see is what you want....

To get started, you may load a Demoshow with a simple set of Views with window arrangements , however to work efficiently with the console you should create your own views, optimized for your type of show, amount of fixtures, and your personal preferences regarding data-presentation

Window arrangements

Windows are created by pressing an empty space on your screen, and choosing type of window, from the Create Window dialog.

Windows may be moved by dragging the headline, and resized by dragging the lower right corner. After filling your screen with multiple windows, it could look something like this:

Window options

Every window has a yellow ball in the upper left corner, which may be used to access the Window Option dialog. Within the options dialog, you may select how the data is presented, fontsize, readout, special filters, toolbars etc.

Here is two examples of the same Window, Fixture Sheet , but with different options:

Views

Window arrangements and options, are stored in as Views. By pressing Store, and an empty Viewbutton on the right part of the screen, the console will create a new View, and assign the View to the button, for easy recall of the current arrangement.

Concept: System Setup

Click on the sub topic for more info about the System Setup topics.

Concept: Fixture Schedule

In Fixture Schedule you define the types and number of fixtures used in your show.

The process of building your fixture schedule consist of importing FixtureTypes from the Library, and adding quantities of these types into your showfile.

The Fixture Schedule may be segmented into multiple Layers, to simplify navigation within setups with large amount of fixtures and or different fixture-types.

Fixture-types Library

The grandMA2 comes with an extensive library of fixture-types from known (and unknown) manufacturers.

Generic fixture-types like ordinary dimmer channels, simple RGB LEDs, scrollers etc may be found via the manufacturer "Generic"

Altering fixture types must be done in the Fixture Schedule, and any changes first takes place when you exit. If in a session, the new schedule will be uploaded to all other stations

Fixture & Channel ID

To be able to program the fixtures defined in the Fixture Schedule they need to given either a Channel ID a Fixture ID - or both. Without any ID's you will not be able to program the fixtures, but as opposed to deleting the fixtures, removing ID's we keep existing data in your showfile.

Altering ID's must be done in the Fixture Schedule, and any changes first takes place when you exit. If in a session, the new schedule will be uploaded to all other stations

DMX Patch

To be able to control (and visualize) the fixtures they need to be patched to a given DMX address and Universe.

The grandMA2 supports patching to 256 different universes, and address & universe are given in the format universe.start_address e.g. 1.1 = first address of first universe, 256.512 = last address of last universe

The DMX-patch does not have to be edited within the Fixture Schedule. The patch may be altered at any-time via the Fixture Sheet or Commandline.

Fixture Positions

By placing each fixture with XYZ in a three-dimensional environment, the fixtures may be visualized in the Stage Window (wire-frame) and via a connected PC running grandMA3D (realistic).

Fixture Positions does not have to be edited within the Fixture Schedule. the positions may be altered at any-time via the Stage Window

Concept: Extended Operation

Click on any of the sub topics for more info about the Extended Operations.

Concept: Agenda

The agenda is a calendar system, that allows you to run a user-defined command at a certain time. This can be a specific time (e.g. at 5 o'clock) or a more variable time (e.g. at sunset).

The Agenda is primary intended for architectual installation, however you can also use it to remind you to take coffee breaks or other reminders.

Concept: Bitmaps

Bitmaps, or Bitmap effects, are threedimensional pixelmapping used to generate dynamic effects from animating image-files.

Oridinary pixelmapping has been limited to overlay a twodimentional image, with a twodimentional representation of your fixures, and map corresponding pixels to fixtures. However, in real life your fixtures are not neccessarily located in one flat plane, and your audience does not neccessarily have a direct 90 degrees viewing angle of your "plane" with fixtures.

grandMA series2 has taken pixelmapping to the next level:

Every fixture's position in 3D space may be considerd a pixel of a virtual 3-dimensional canvas/screen.

Onto this screen (or a selection of it) you can from any angle/position virtually "project" an image, and animate its position rotation and size.

Concept: Chaser

Chaser are used when you need more than an loop with more two step. If you only need two steps then you might want to use an effect.

A Chaser is a sequence that run in a loop. It disregards the timing in the sequence and uses the speed setting to run through all the cues. Cue cues are referred to as steps. Each cue is a step in the chaser.

As mentioned above all timing information in the sequence is ignored and all loop information is also not used. Commands are executed and the Command Delay is the one timing from the sequence that's actually used.

You can set a direction in a chase. There are four different directions. "Forward" and "Backward" is self explanatory. A different option is "Bounce". With this it will run through the steps to the end and then run backwards to the first step then change direction again and run forward to the last step and continue bouncing between the first and last step. The last option is "Random". This will run the steps in a random pattern.

But a chase can also run backwards using the GoBack command or GO-. So if you have a chaser that uses the direction "Backward" and you start it using GoBack it will actually run forward. You can change this in the Edit Chase pop-up.

The speed controls the how fast the chaser loops. There are two other important time settings. The two other are called "Fade" and "MFade".

The Fade is used to set how much the chaser should fade between the steps. This is set as a percentage. If the percent is 0, then the chaser will snap between the steps. If it’s all the way up to 100%, then it will use all the time it can (restricted by the speed) to fade between the steps. The MFade is used when you want to fade in the first step and fade out when you stop the chase. This is set as a time value.

On the Chaser Encoder Toolbar you have four encoders. The first encoder (from the left) is the "Master" for the intensity. The second encoder is the "Speed". The next encoder is the "Fade". The last encoder is the "Off-Time".

Using the Chaser encoder toolbar is the best way to change these settings unless you have expanded your chaser to several faders and can assign the function to faders. You can also select the chaser executor and use the Special Masters to change the settings.

Concept: Colordim

The colordim system is for LED fixtures.

The Colordim parameters are used for LED fixtures. This allows you to create and use LED fixtures with many different colored LEDs.

If the fixture also have a dimmer attribute, then the colordim attributes can use and follow MIB.

If you use the Special Color Dialog with the Colordims it will only affect Red (Colordim 1), Green (Colordim 2) and Blue (Colordim 3).

List of Colordims

This is the list of Colordim colors.

  • Colordim 1 = Red
  • Colordim 2 = Green
  • Colordim 3 = Blue
  • Colordim 4 = Amber
  • Colordim 5 = White
  • Colordim 6 = Warm White
  • Colordim 7 = Cool White
  • Colordim 8 = Orange
  • Colordim 9 = Red Orange
  • Colordim 10 = Purple
  • Colordim 11 = Indigo
  • Colordim 12 = Cyan
  • Colordim 13 = Magenta
  • Colordim 14 = Yellow
  • Colordim 15 = UV
  • Colordim 16 = Green Cyan
  • Colordim 17 = Medium White

Concept: Telnet & Commandline browsing

Editing show-data solely via commandline entries

Whatever you do with the command line, you are accessing a database that represents your current show file. The structure of that database is a tree. By default when using the commandline, you are at the root of the tree, and you commands will be directed to the correct branch, by the content of your command. In some situations it may be convenient to direct your commands to a specific part of the tree.

This may be achieved with the command CD (Change Destination).

If your destination is not the root, the Commandline input field will display the destination as a prefix of the commandline. Press the yellow ball to open the Commandline Response window

Edit Setup/FixtureTypes>

In the situation above, Store 1 will create FixtureType 1, rather than the usual Cue 1.

When your commandline is directed to a specific destination, you can still do normal operations, however shorthand entry no longer work, you need to enter the full syntax Store Cue 1 to create Cue 1

Keywords

Store
Create new data/object at the current destination
Delete
Destroy/remove data/object at the current destination
List
Display data at the current destination
CD
Change Destination
Assign
Set values to object properties and create cross-references between objects

Concept: DMX channels vs. Parameters

What's the difference between DMX channels and Parameter counting?

So why is MA talking about parameters and you are still thinking in universes?

Well, I can tell you the difference between the two, but to make MA or you change your ways, is a bit out of the scope if this manual. The physical DMX512 output on all grandMA2 products is a 5 pin XLR connector. A connector like that will output one universe equal to 512 DMX channels. Okay, that’s pretty standard knowledge.

So why are MA talking about parameters?

Well, let’s have a look at the DMX history. Some years back the only thing controlled by DMX was dimmers. The standard was designed to make a smooth transition from 0 to 100% Because of the way the protocol works it was decided that 256 steps would do the trick.

A lot of water passed under the bridge and now DMX controls everything (well almost everything). Some things were just not happy with 256 steps (also known as 8-bit). Like Panning from 0 to 460 degrees in 256 steps gives you something close to 1,8 degrees per step. That really wasn’t good enough. So someone thought of adding the values of one DMX channel to another. And then we had 16-bit equals 65.536 steps! That's much better for panning. But some products still needed more than that. And we have 24-bit and that’s a stacking 16.777.216 steps!

MA is only thinking in parameters. If you think of a fixture with a 16-bit Pan, 16-bit Tilt and an 8-bit Dimmer. This is 5 DMX channels, but MA is only calculating this as three parameters (Pan, Tilt & Dim). The internal calculations of the parameters are higher than 8/16/24-bit (more like 32-bit), and they are then converted down to the amount of DMX channels a parameter uses.

Now how does this affect you and why should you care?

Let’s imagine that you have bought a grandMA 2Port Node onPC. This acts like a hardware dongle for 512 parameters. This means that you can with an onPC control 512 parameters. Let’s imagine that you only control dimmers. But you have 512 of them. When MA is only counting parameters, it doesn’t matter if they are 8-bit, 16-bit or 24-bit dimmers.

If MA was counting in DMX channels, you could control 512 8-bit dimmers or 256 16-bit dimmers or 170 24-bit dimmers.

Is that fair? MA doesn’t think so. That’s why they think in parameters and you should be a happy customer :-)

If you want to know more about parameter count and expansion, follow the link below.

Concept: Hardkey keyword overview

Hardkey keyword overview text

Hard Key Combinations Command Description
<<< <<< Go fast Backward and ignore the cue timing
<<< <<< Black Blackout an executor without timing
>>> >>> Go fast Forward and ignore the cue timing
>>> >>> Flash Flash an executor without timing
Align Align "<" Fan from first selected to…
Align Align Align ">" Fan from last selected to…
Align Align Align Align "><" Fan from the center of the selection
Align Align Align Align Align "<>" Fan between first and last selected
Align Align Align Align Align Align Off switch off the Fan function
Assign Assign e.g.: Assign Executor or Assign Flash Executor 1
Assign Assign Label Label the object
AT AT channel 1 at 100 or fixture 1 at fixture 2
AT AT Normal set the selection to the AT Normal Value
AT (long press) -- AT Filter temporay View
Blind Blind switch on/off the Live programmer to black
Blind (long press) BlindEdit switch on/off the second blind programmer
Bt Pg - ButtonPage - go to the previous Button Page
Bt Pg - (long press) ButtonPage 1 go to the first Button Page
Bt Pg + ButtonPage + go to the next Button Page
Ch Pg - ChannelPage - go to the previous Channel Page
Ch Pg - (long press) ChannelPage 1 go to the first Channel Page
Ch Pg + ChannelPage + go to the next Channel Page
Channel Channel Channel object
Channel Channel Dmx Dmx object
Channel Channel Channel DmxUniverse Dmx Universe object
Clear ClearSelection, deselect all fixtures or channels in the programmer
Clear (long press) ClearAll release everything and clear the programmer
Clear Clear ClearActive deactivate all values in the programmer
Clear Clear Clear ClearAll release everything and clear the programmer
Copy Copy Copy source object at destination object
Copy Copy Clone Clone source object at destination object
Cue Cue Cue object
Cue Cue Part Part Cue object
Delete Delete e.g.: Delete Sequence or Delete Executor
Delete Delete Remove load a Remove in the programmer
Delete Delete Delete Release load a Release in the programmer
dot dot e.g.: Move Cue 1.1 AT 1.999
dot dot Zero set the selection at dimmer value zero
Down -- Page down in the window with the last focus
Edit Edit load a cue in the programmer, e.g.: Edit Cue x Please
Edit + Next/Previous -- load the next/previous cue in the programmer
Effect Effect Effect object
Effect (long press) -- Running Effects temporary View
Effect Effect Bitmap Bitmap object
Effect Effect Effect Form Form object
Executor Executor Executor object, e.g.: Executor 1 AT 100 Fade 5
Executor Executor SpecialMaster Special Master object
Fd Pg - FaderPage - go to the previous Fader Page
Fd Pg - (long press) FaderPage 1 go to the first Fader Page
Fd Pg + FaderPage + go to the next Fader Page
Fix Fix Fix an executor for all pages
Fixture Fixture Fixture object
Fixture Fixture Selection the actual programmer selection, e.g.: Park Selection Please
Full Full set selection to dimmer value 100%
Full Full -- loads the highlight values in the programmer
Go - Go - e.g.: Go to the previous cue in the Sequence
Go + Go + a Go to next cue in the Sequence with cue timing
Go + Go + Unpark e.g.: Unpark Selection Please
Go+ Prvw PreviewExecutor step through a cuelist in preview mode
Goto Goto e.g.: Goto Executor Please or Goto Cue x Please
Goto Goto Load e.g.: Load Executor Please or Load Cue x Please
Group Group Group object
Group (long press) -- Groupmaster temporary View
Group Group World World Object, e.g.: World 1 Please selects the Full World
Help + Object e.g.: Help Fixture Please opens the temporary Help View for the Fixture Keyword
Help Please Help opens the temporary Help View
Help Help CmdHelp displays all Shortcuts in the command window
Highlight Highlight set the selection to the highlight values
Highlight (long press) -- the highlight values of the selection is flashing
IF IfOutput select fixtures with dimmer value higher than 0%
IF IF IfActive select fixtures with active values in the programmer
IF IF IF IfProg select fixtures with active or deactive values in the programmer
IF IF IF IF If for example Group x If Group y selects fixtures which exists in both groups
Learn Learn a Learn Speed for an Chaser or Effect
Learn Learn Rate1 e.g.: Rate1 Executor 1 set the Rate back to 1:1 of an executor
List -- switch the x-keys to button executors
MA (long press) -- a temporary View of View Page 1 thru 10 at the V1 thru V10 hard keys
MA + 1 Presettype "Dimmer" select Presettype 1 also connect through the Attributes 1.1, 1.2,…
MA + 1 + +/- -- Intensity Littlights
MA + 2 Presettype "Position" select Presettype 2 also connect through the Attributes 2.1, 2.2,…
MA + 2 + +/- -- Intensity 15 inch displays
MA + 3 Presettype "Gobo" select Presettype 3 also connect through the Attributes 3.1, 3.2,…
MA + 3 + +/- -- Intensity 9 inch display
MA + 4 Presettype "Color" select Presettype 4 also connect through the Attributes 4.1, 4.2,…
MA + 4 + +/- -- Intensity button backlight
MA + 5 Presettype "Beam" select Presettype 5 also connect through the Attributes 5.1, 5.2,…
MA + 6 Presettype "Focus" select Presettype 6 also connect through the Attributes 6.1, 6.2,…
MA + 7 Presettype "Control" select Presettype 7 also connect through the Attributes 7.1, 7.2,…
MA + 8 Presettype "Shapers" select Presettype 8 also connect through the Attributes 8.1, 8.2,…
MA + 8 -- displays the battery charge level on the X1 thru X10 key for 10 seconds
MA + 9 Presettype "Video" select Presettype 9 also connect through the Attributes 9.1, 9.2,…
MA + dot Default set the selection to default values of the Fixture
MA + dot Default set the value of any object or the current selection at the default value
MA + Down -- Monitorwing Steppermotor moves down
MA + Effect SyncEffects sync all effects in the programmer
MA + Group Layout Layout object
MA + List List list objects in the command line window, e.g.: List Fixture thru
MA + Move Replace (no function) .
MA + Next NextRow selects the next row
MA + Please -- force the focus to the command line
MA + Previous PreviousRow selects the previous row
MA + Previous + Next AllRows selects all rows
MA + Previous + Set + Next MAtricksBlocks Off Blocks Off
MA + Set -- Unlock Monitorwing Steppermotor
MA + Set + Next MAtricksBlocks + Blocks +1
MA + Set + Previous MAtricksBlocks - Blocks -1
MA + Store Record e.g.: Record Timecode 1 Please
MA + Time Time Time… -- connect through the Effects Form, Speed,… Layers
MA + UP -- Monitorwing Steppermotor moves up
MA + Update ListUpdate shows you all possible objects for the update in the Command View
MA + View Screen Screen object, e.g.: Delete Screen 2 Please
MA + AT Stomp Stomp is a function to stop running effects
MA + AT + AT Extract Extract will break any referenced links and apply the hardvalues instead
Macro Macro Macro object
Macro Macro Timecode Timecode object
Macro Macro Macro Agenda Agenda object
minus - Group 5 - fixture 10
minus minus minus … At - 10 dimmer goes down in steps of 10 percent
Move Move Move source object at destination object
Move Move Insert (no function) .
Next Next select the next fixture or fixture of a selection
Off Off Knockout values or release executors
Off Off -- Off Menu temporary View
On On e.g.: On Selection or On Cue
On On Call e.g.: Call Cue Thru x Please will call the status of the cue in the programmer
Oops Oops 100 x Undo
Oops (long press) -- Oops History temporary View
Page Page Page object
Page Page ChannelPage Channel Page object
Page Page Page FaderPage Fader Executor Page object
Page Page Page Page ButtonPage Button Executor Page object
Pause Pause Pause the actual cue fade
Pause Pause Park e.g.: Park Channel x Please
Please Please execute the command
Please Please -- activate all attributes for the selection
plus + fixture 1 + fixture 2
plus plus plus … At + 10 dimmer goes up in steps of 10 percent
Preset Preset Preset object
Preset Preset Attribute Attribute object, e.g.: Attribute 2.1.2 AT 50 sets the Tilt At 50
Preset Preset Preset Gel (no function) .
Previous Previous select the previous fixture or fixture of a selection
Previous + Next All leaves the Next/Previous selection and selects all (old grandMA1 SET hard key)
Previous + Set + Next MAtricksInterleave Off Interleave Off
Prvw Preview e.g.: Preview Cue x Please
Prvw Prvw PreviewEdit switch the preview mode on/off
Select Select e.g.: Select Executor 1
Select Select Selfix e.g.: Selfix Executor 1 will select all used fixtures of this executor
Sequence Sequence Sequence object
Set MAtricks Toggle toggles between the all and actual selection from Next/Previous
Set + Next MAtricksInterleave + Interleave +1
Set + Previous MAtricksInterleave - Interleave -1
Store Store Store an object
Store (long press) -- Store Options temporary View
Temp Temp Flash an executor with timing
Temp Temp Toggle switch an executor on and off
Thru Thru fixture 1 thru 10 please or fixture 1 thru 10 at 0 thru 100
Time Value switch to Layer Value
Time Time Fade switch to Layer Fade
Time Time Time Delay switch to Layer Delay
Top Top jump to the first cue of a sequence
Top Top Kill release all executors on all pages excluding this executor
Up -- Page up in the window with the last focus
Update Update Update temporary View
View View View object
View View ViewButton View Button object, e.g.: ViewButton 11.1 is the User1 first x-key
View View View ViewPage View Pages 1 thru 10

Concept: Layouts

Topographical layouts - magic sheet

Layouts are interactive 2 dimensional drawings where you may freely arrange channels fixtures, draw shapes and write text, add macros presets or other objects.

Via the Layout Pool, you may create multiple layouts for each part of your stage. Use the Layout View to edit content of layouts and to display layouts.

Concept: Macros

A Macro is a userdefined list of commandline entries, used for automation of complex and/or repetitive tasks.

In addition to the traditional macros of series1, grandMA2 macros may be used as a scripting language, with possebilities to create dialogs for user-input, conditional execution of macrolines, - interacting with the users current commandline, or as parallell execution, not interfering with the commandline.

Macros may be executed directly from the Macro-pool, or be assigned to any Executor, View or X-key User button, for direct hardkey access.

When CLI is disabled for a macro, the actual press of the Macro will no longer interact with your commandline, but directly execute its content. This means that i.e to edit or delete this object you cannot just press the command and then the button, you will need to type the actual keyword and ID. e.g. Edit Macro 5 to edit macro 5 or Delete ViewButton 11.5 to remove the macro from the User1 X5-button). By disabling the CommandLineInteraction of the actual buttonpress, you can make the content of the macrolines interact, by the use of the @-sign.

Example:

SetVar $answer= ("your flash buttons to be 1 -above- or 2 -below- the faders?")

SetVar $button = [$answer==1] ExecButton2 [answer==2] ExecButton1

Assign Flash at $button 1 Thru 30

Concept: MIDI Show Control (MSC)

MIDI Show Control (MSC) are MIDI commands automatically sent from the console when executing cues and moving faders. You can also remote control a console by sending MSC messages to it.

MIDI Show Control (MSC) is used to send and receive show control data.

Show control data is used to control other devices or to be controlled by other devices. This can be used to sync several elements in your show.

MSC is a standard used by many manufacturers. This allows you sync your show across light, sound, stage, etc.

It can also be used to remote control the console from any equipment that can send Midi.

The console will automatically send MSC messages when MSC Out is turned on.

When MSC In is turned on, the console will listen to MSC messages and act accordingly.

The console will ignore the message if it isn'’t recognized as a valid MSC massage.

MIDI is usually transmitted in hex numbers. They are organized in groups of 2 numbers.

You might be using a MSC software that offers you a more comfortable way to work with MSC, but to understand the basic MSC message the following is only concerned with the raw MSC hex data.

This is the format of a MSC message:

F0 7F [Device ID] 02 [Command Format] [Command] [Data] F7

In the following we'll have a look at the different elements in the square brackets.

Device ID:

Let’s first have a look at “Device ID”. This is used to limit the receivers of the MSC message. There are three categories. “Individual device” number, “group” number and “All” devices.

The device ID is a 2 digit hex number. And the three categories are divided like this:

00 - 6F
112 individual device numbers.
70 - 7E
15 group numbers.
7F
All Call = broadcast to all receivers.

Command Format:

Command format is used to indicate the type of equipment that’s intended to receive the MSC message.

The list of different equipment is long, but the console only responds to and transmit three different command formats. They are:

01
General Light
02
Moving Light
7F
All

Commands:

The console supports five different commands.

There's a small risk of crashing the console if you transmit MSC messages that isn't supported.

The commands are:

01 (GO)
This is a GOTO command. It needs to be followed by a cue number.
02 (STOP)
This is like hitting the Pause key. This can be followed by a cue number.
03 (RESUME)
This is the only way to "un-pause" and continue a paused fade. If you have paused a specific cue, you'll need to un-pause that specific cue.
04 (TIMED_GO)
This will perform a goto command with a specified fade time. The format is: 04 [time] [cue]. Read more about how to write the time in hex below.
06 (SET)
This is used to move faders. This is followed by four bytes (8 hex numbers). The first two hex numbers are the executor number. The next two are the executor page number. The last two groups of Hex numbers are the fader position. Least significant first, most significant last.

Read more about the different commands below.

01 (GO)

This is the same as a GOTO command. After the “01” command you’ll need to specify a cue number (the "Data" part of the massage). Cue numbers need to be transmitted in ASCII format using hex. This means that if you need to transmit the cue number 4 you’ll need to use the hex number “34”. All number can be transmitted by placing a “3” in front of it. A dot is “2E” in hex. So to transmit the cue number “309.45” you’ll need to transmit “33 30 39 2E 34 35”.

You may also specify an executor and executor page number. This is controlled by the MSC options in Setup. You’ll need to separate the cue number and the executor by a “00”.

An executor and page can be separated by a space (00) or a dot (2E). So if you need to trigger cue 5 on executor 4 on page 3 and the separation is a dot, you’ll need to transmit the following data: “35 00 34 2E 33”. If the separator between the executor and page is a space then the same command would be “35 00 34 00 33”.

The grandMA2 always transmit full cue numbers with three decimals. This means that the cue number 2 is transmitted as “2.000” (“32 2E 30 30 30”) and cue number 2.5 is transmitted as “2.500” ("32 2E 35 30 30") but it doesn’t need to receive full cue numbers.

The full MSC message for a GOTO cue 4.5 on executor 12 on page 1 (dot separator) to all devices and all types of equipment is: F0 7F 7F 02 7F 01 34 2E 35 00 31 32 2E 31 F7 .

02 (STOP)

This is like hitting the pause button. Please read the section above for a better understanding of the hex cue numbering system.

How much you need to transmit is dependent of the MSC options in Setup. If the “MSC In Exec” option is “Default Only” they only the default executor will respond and you don’t need to send any “Data” values. So you’ll only need to send “F0 7F [Device ID] 02 [Command Format] 02 F7”.

The console will transmit “F0 7F [Device ID] 02 [Command Format] 02 30 2E 30 30 30 F7”. This is like sending a “pause running cue” command.

If you have specified in the Setup that you need to specify an executor and a page, then you’ll also have to specify this for the Stop command. And then you’ll have to transmit the “running cue” number. The full MSC message for stopping a running cue on executor 12 on page 1 (dot separator) to all devices and all types of equipment is: F0 7F 7F 02 7F 02 30 00 31 32 2E 31 F7 . This is the shortest possible format for that MSC message. The console would transmit the full message: F0 7F 7F 02 7F 02 30 2E 30 30 30 00 31 32 2E 31 F7 .

03 (RESUME)

This is the only way to continue a paused cue. The only difference between the Stop and Resume commands are the “02” and “03”. So continuing the cue we just paused in the example above would be:F0 7F 7F 02 7F 03 30 00 31 32 2E 31 F7 .

Again if the MSC options in Setup is set to “Default Only”. You can just transmit F0 7F 7F 02 7F 03 F7 to continue the fade.

04 (TIMED_GO)

This is the same as the 01 (Go) command but with a specified time. So, if you haven’t already, please read (and understand) the 01 (GO) section above. Just to make this a bit simpler we are going to pretend that the “Default Only” option is turned on in the MSC options in Setup.

To transmit a timed GOTO you need to specify the time first and then the cue number. The time is specified by five 2-digit hex numbers. They represent (in order) Hour Minute Second Frame and Fraction.

The hour, minute and second sections are very strait forward. You’ll need to transmit the value in hex number but you can transmit a value above the normal limit i.e. you can transmit 64 seconds (“40” in hex). The console will transmit this as 1 minute and 4 seconds.

Right now the console will not accept any time specified in the Frame and Fraction sections. But it transmit values below a second in the Frame section. The console divides the second into 24 frames. So 0.5 seconds is 12 Frames and the received hex number is “0C”.

Follow the link below to a table that compares decimal and hex numbers.

06 (SET)

The set command is used to move a fader to specific position. The “06” is followed by two 2-digit hex numbers that indicate the fader and then two more 2-digit hex numbers that dictates the position.

The first of the two numbers for the fader is the fader number (on a page). The first fader are hex number “00”, the second “01” and so on. Remember that this is a hex number so fader 16 have hex number “0F” and 17 is “10”.

The second of the two numbers for the faders are the page number. This is 1 to 1 - although also in hex. But page 1 is “01” in hex and page 2 is “02” etc.

So, how to calculate the position in hex numbers? For this we need to do some math. The faders’ position is defined by a coarse and fine value. The scale for both values is 128 steps. The “Fine” value is transmitted first followed by the “Coarse” value. So you need to multiply the desired fader position (in percent) by 1.28. The resulting integer is the “Coarse” value. The rest of the number (everything on the right side of the separator) should be multiplied with 128 to get the “Fine” value. The two decimal numbers should be converted to hex. You can use the link below to a table that allows you to convert up to decimal number 128.

Let’s try to do an example. Let’s say you want to move a fader to 45%. Multiply 45 with 1.28 (45*1.28) this gives you 57.6. So our Coarse value is “57”. Now we need to multiply 0.6 with 128 (0.6*128). This gives us 76.8. So our Fine value is “76”. Decimal “57” is “39” in hex. Decimal “76” is “4C” in hex. Remember that we need to transmit the Fine value first. Our two hex numbers after “06” is “4C 39”. If we then need to move fader 3 on page 1, our complete MSC message would be: F0 7F 7F 02 7F 06 02 01 4C 39 (all devices and all command formats).

The console only transmit the position of some faders (executors and all the green colored special masters (for the selected executor)), but it accepts positions for all faders that have something assigned.

Hope you got a better understanding of MSC

As mentioned before, you might be using some software that makes this more user friendly, but you might need to know what's really happening down in the hex numbers.

The following are some more examples of MSC messages.

Example:

Console options: MSC In Exec: Exec.Page and MSC In Command: All.

Sending a GOTO cue 15 on executor 5 on page 1:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 01 31 35 00 35 2E 31 F7

Sending a GOTO cue 425.36 on executor 2 on page 3:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 01 34 32 35 2E 33 36 00 32 2E 33 F7

Stopping a running cue on executor 1 on page 1:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 02 30 00 31 2E 31 F7

Continue the cue on executor 1 on page 1:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 03 30 00 31 2E 31 F7

Sending a GOTO cue 25.5 in 30 seconds on executor 2 on page4:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 04 00 00 1E 00 00 32 35 2E 35 00 32 2E 34 F7

Sending a GOTO cue 4 in 5 seconds on executor 7 on page 1:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 04 00 00 04 00 00 34 00 37 2E 31 F7

Moving fader number 4 on page 1 to 75%:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 06 03 01 00 60 F7

Moving fader number 1 on page 1 to 32%:

F0 7F 7F 02 7F 06 00 01 7A 28 F7

Topic: Decimal ArtNet Hex ASCII - table

This is a table that compare decimal numbers, ArtNet, Hex and ASCII.

Concept: List of keywords from multiple key presses

This list displays the keyword given when you press some keys multiple times.

The text in square brackets are the text on the actual key. E.g. the Exec key gives you the Executor keyword first time you press it.

If you find something that isn't here please let us know using this contact form (only online manual).

Concept: Multi User

Multi users allows you to be several programmers (or users) working together on the same show.

By the use of user-login with userprofile, each operator may tailor the console to his/her needs, with individual Views, default settings and programmer. In a session with multiple stations/consoles, the operator may log into any console and be "home".

Concept: Networking

A network can be a simple thing as a computer with onPC and a 2Port Node, your console and some Artnet devices, or a massive network with several stations, Video servers, dimmers, 3D visualizers and nodes. A session has the following limits:32 stations class A (consols, NPU, onPC), 64 stations class B (VPU, 3d) 128 stations class C (2-port-Nodes, 4-port-Nodes).

The grandMA2 series is designed for networking. Beeing in a network is the normal situation. Even if the console is all alone on the network, it will run happily with all the network functionallity.

Every console has two Ethernet ports at the back:

Ethernet 1
Intended for MA-Net and other Multicast DMX protocols - e.g. sACN (this is the network interface card Eth0)
Ethernet 2
Intended for Broadcast protocols (currently used for ArtNet only)(this is the network interface card Eth1)

Networking is enabled by Starting (or joining) a Session via MA Network Control, under the Setup>Network tab.

A session is a group of stations, communicating and sharing data within a network. There may coexist 32 different Sessions within the same Network.

Additional members/stations in the session may be added and removed via the MA Network Configuration, under the same tab.

DMX Streaming over Ethernet is configured under the DMX-protocols menu

Concept: grandMA NPU - Network Processing Unit

The grandMA NPU works as a parameter expansion and DMX output unit.

The grandMA NPU can be connected to a series 1 or series 2 network.

The NPU helps the consoles with the output calculations, and it provides 8 DMX ports that can be configured as input or output. The output follows the USITT DMX512-A protocol.

One of the main thoughs behind the NPU, is a central DMX output/iinput device, that's shared by all the stations in the MA-Net. It supports the system with real time calculations and parameter expansion (4,096 parameters).

It's very important to know that, if a NPU is set to be a member of several sessions in a network, It will connect to the session that reaches the NPU first!! If that session is then closed - Then the NPU will connect to the next session it finds on the network, possibly creating a very different DMX output!

grandMA2 NPU Hardware

The grandMA2 NPU is a 3 unit 19" rack mount device with an 7" internal touchscreen. It has 8 DMX ports (5-pin female XLR) and 3 USB plugs.

Series 2 Mode

When you use the grandMA NPU in Series 2 mode, it provides parameters to the network. It can be used with a grandMA2 console or with grandMA2 onPC.

In this mode you can use the touch screen to change some of the setting. DMX port settings needs to be changed from a console or onPC.

Series 1 Mode

You can also use the grandMA NPU in Series 1 mode. When connected to a console or onPC it also provides parameters.

When in series 1 mode, you can only make change to the NPU using a USB keyboard.

If you need to read more

There's a manual guide directing you to all the pages in the manual that has anything to do with the grandMA NPU: Manual Guide - NPU

Concept: Parameter expansion

Here we have a look at how you can expand your parameter count.

This page is a closer look at how many parameters you can control and how you can expand that number. At the bottom of this page there's a link to a page that explains the difference between "Parameter" and "DMX universe". If you have any doubt in this area you should take the time to read it.

Parameter count

There are a fewer parameter numbers to remember in grandMA2.

This section is about the parameter count for single units

If we begin at the top end and work our way down the ranks:

Full-Size:
8192 parameters.
Light:
4096 parameters.
Ultra-Light:
4096 parameters.
Replay-Unit:
4096 parameters.
NPU:
4096 parameters (also with onPC).
onPC Command Wing:
2048 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
onPC Fader Wing:
2048 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
8Port Node onPC:
2048 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
4Port Node onPC:
2048 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
NSP (in grandMA2 4Port Node mode):
2048 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
2Port Node onPC Pro:
1024 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
2Port Node onPC:
512 parameters (only when connected with onPC).
8Port Node (not onPC version):
Doesn't provide parameter expansion.
4Port Node (not onPC version):
Doesn't provide parameter expansion.
2Port Node Flush mount version:
Doesn't provide parameter expansion.

Parameter expansion

The NPU is the only unit that expands your parameter count when you use a grandMA2 console. Every NPU you add to your network, also adds 4096 parameters!

You can add a maximum of 16 NPUs regardless of your console. There's a maximum limit of 65.536 parameters in a grandMA2 session.

The NPUs help with parameter calculations.

Using an onPC with wings, nodes and NPU

When you use a grandMA2 onPC you need some MA hardware to unlock parameters. The maximum allowed parameters for a onPC system is 4096 parameters!

You can combine any number of onPC hardware with your computer. Every piece of hardware will add it's parameters until you reach the limit of 4096 parameters.

This is the only two rules for parameters with grandMA2 onPC.

Remember you can always add more units to get more DMX connectors.

Here are some examples:

onPC + Command Wing = 2048 parameters.

onPC + Command Wing + 2Port Node onPC Pro = 3072 parameters.

onPC + Command Wing + Fader Wing = 4096 parameters.

onPC + 2Port Node onPC + 2Port Node onPC = 1024 parameters.

onPC + Command Wing + Fader Wing + 8Port node onPC = 4096 parameters (you have reached the limit).

onPC + Command Wing + NPU = 4096 (you have reached the limit).

MA VPU and onPC

If you are using a MA VPU it supplies it's own parameters and doesn't affect the limit. You can control several VPU's using an onPC. If you however are using a mix of VPU and other fixtures you need some MA hardware to give you the parameters for the fixtures.

Even though the VPU doesn't count in your parameter limit, you should patch your VPU on a higher universe than your other fixtures. There's a risk that it will steal the parameters from the other fixtures, if you have it on a lower universe than the fixtures.

Concept: grandMA2 replay unit

The grandMA2 replay unit works as a rack mount console.

A grandMA2 replay unit is a basically a grandMA2 light compacted into a rack unit but without the user interface. There's a small 7" internal touch screen that allows you to do everything you can on the small screen.

The screen works as a combination of screen 1 and 2. It's devided into two areas as the multitouch on a console, but the lower part is mostly displaying the encoder toolbars. Se below for example screenshots.

The grandMA2 replay unit can be connected to a series 2 network and can only boot in series 2 mode.

grandMA2 replay unit Hardware

The grandMA2 replay unit is a 3 unit 19" rack mount device with an 7" internal touchscreen.

  • 6 female DMX ports and 1 male DMX port (5-pin XLR).
  • 2 Ethercon connectors for Ethernet.
  • 2 DVI-I connector for external screens.(also specified touch screens)
  • MA-Link.
  • Sub-D 25 connector for remote control.
  • MIDI in and out.
  • Sound and LTC input (3-pin female XLR).
  • 3 USB plugs.
  • 1 reset button.

Some example screenshots

Topic: grandMA Show Converter

The grandMA Show Converter converts grandMA1 shows stored with version 6.6 into grandMA2 shows Version 2.5.

The following elements of the grandMA1 show will be converted into a grandMA2 show.

Be aware all other elements of the grandMA1 show will not be converted into the grandMA2 show. E.g.
  • User profiles
  • Effects, bitmap effects, layouts and modulators
  • Fixture Schedule function invert per fixture
  • MATricks
  • Timecode and Agenda

Main Menu

The show source can be specified at the upper part of the screen. Select will open the Source popup

The destination of the converted show has to be specified at the lower part of the screen. Select will open the Destination popup.

Start will start the showfile conversion and open the log view.

Help will open this helpfile.

Source Popup

grandMA OnPC1 Folder: Select this source to convert all shows currently stored at your grandMA1 onPC.

grandMA USB Folder:Select this source to convert all shows currently stored at the plugged in USB device.

Showfile (*.tar.gz): Opens a file browser to select a single show (only *.tar.gz) currently stored at your grandMA1 onPC or at the GMASHOWS folder of your usb stick.

Show Folder: Opens a file browser popup to select any other folder containing grandMA1 shows as source.

Destination Popup

grandMA onPC2 Folder: The converted files will be stored at the current onPC2 shows folder at your computer.

grandMA USB Folder: The converted files will be stored at the (USBDRIVE)\gma2\shows folder.

grandMA2 Show Folder: Opens a file browser popup to select any other folder as target to store the converted shows to.

Log View

This view displays all log messages during the show convertion. When the convertion is finished, Done! will be displayed at the upper left corner of this view.

CopyLog: will copy the logfile to the clipboard.

close:will close the Log View to return to the main screen.

cancel will stop the showfile convertion and will return to main screen.

Please also have a look at the grandMA ShowConverter Tutorial.

Concept: Stage Window and grandMA 3D

inbuilt and external visualizers

By entering 3-dimensional data of your fixtures location, their operation may visualized internally via the stage-window (wire-frame), and externally via a networked computer running grandMA 3D (realistic)

Learn more about the inbuilt Stage-View by following the related links at the bottom, and check out the manual of grandMA 3D here

Concept: Timecode

synchronisation with external sources

There are different types of timecodes. The grandMA2 accepts LTC (Linear TimeCode) also known as SMPTE and MTC (MIDI TimeCode). The purpose of timecode is to synchronize the light with other type of medias (e.g. sound and/or video).

Concept: What's the difference between Worlds, Filters and Masks.

From version 2.5 there's a new Filter and Mask system. In this text we'll have a look some of the differences and how to use them.

Worlds are used to restrict access to Fixtures, Channels and Attributes. The elements not in the applied World are not displayed in sheets and cannot be accessed by the programmer. Values store in a sequence will still be played back.

Filters are used to limit what to store and playback from an executor. Applying a Filter will not hide elements in sheets, but will only store/copy/retreat(at) attributes in that filter.

Masks can be used to hide Fixture/Channels and Attributes in sheets. There's a lot of criteria that can be used to display only the desired Fixtures/Channels and Attributes.

World

Worlds are used to limit what you can access and what is displayed in sheets.

The first world in the pool is locked. It contains everything and is used when you don't want to exclude anything.

You can select a new world by simply pressing the pool element.

Worlds can be used as Input filters. This will limit what can be stored. Worlds can also work as Playback Filters for a sequence. This will limit what is executed by a sequence. Let's say you have a sequence that have Dimmer, Pan/Tilt and Color - If you apply a world that only allows dimmer values and some fixtures, then the sequence will only output dimmer values for those fixtures. If you also uses the "Dimmer only" world as a Input filter, then you can only store dimmer values for those fixtures in the sequence. This is all done in the Assign Menu.

Playback filters only works by attributes not by layers (Value, Value Times and Effects). E.g. if you have applied a world that only contains the Effect layers, then everything will still playback - but if you have a world that have only fixture 1, then only fixture 1 will be played back.

Filter

In previous versions there where a lot of different filters. They are now all combined and can be stored and recalled from the Filter pool. That means that the Store Filter and the At Filter are now combined into one filter.

The filter contains a selection of Attributes. A filter is always active, but the first filter contains all attributes and therefor doesn't filter anything out. The first filter is also locked and cannot be edited.

A Filter can be applied(called) and/or permanent selected. An applied filter have a green bar in the middle. A selected filter have a green color in the name area. You can select a different filter by pressing Select followed by a different filter button. You can call a different filter temporarily by just pressing one of the filters.

A called filter overwrites the selected filter. If you press and hold the At key or the Store key you'll get the a filter pop-up. Here you can create a temporary filter. This can be store to the first available pool button using the Store Filter and Select. Here you'll also find a Reset Filter on Clear button. This will keep a temporary (called) filter active until the programmer have been cleared.

Filters can be used as Input filters. This will limit what can be stored. Filters can also work as Playback Filters for a sequence. This will limit what is executed by a sequence. Let's say you have a sequence that have Dimmer, Pan/Tilt and Color - If you apply a filter that only allows dimmer values then the sequence will only output dimmer values. If you also uses the "Dimmer only" filter as a Input filter, then you can only store dimmer values in the sequence. This is all done in the Assign Menu.

Playback filters only works by attributes not by layers (Value, Value Times and Effects). E.g. if you have applied a filter that only contains the Effect layers, then everything will still playback.

When it's not the first filter that's active, then the At key will flash.

The filter pool is a global pool that's shared by all users.

Mask

Masks are used for hiding fixtures and attributes in sheets. There can be a set of criteria that define the mask.

Some sheets allow you to have up to 10 mask buttons in the title bar of sheets (except DMX sheet). This allows you to apply a mask to only that sheet.

You can set the sheet to follow the selected mask. This will allow you to use the Mask pool to mask all sheets (following selected) at the same time.

A mask pool button can be selected by simply pressing the pool element.

The first 6 masks are locked. The very first mask doesn't mask anything.

Concept: Worlds

Worlds are used to limit the number of parameters you have access to. This is essential in a multi-user session but may also be useful for a single operator. Worlds only have an effect on selection and sheets. They have no effect on playback of stored sequences.

Worlds are created in the programmer, and stored in the World Pool. Worlds may be thought of as matrix with rows (fixtures) and columns (attributes), and you may eliminate rows and/or columns

The created world will contain the rows of the current selection, and the columns of any active attribute. If no attributes were active, all columns will be included in the created World.

Example:

Select Fixture 1 Thru 5 , Store World 3, call World 3 .

You will now only have programming access to fixture 1 thru 5, (which is reflected by the Fixture Sheet Window)

If you now with World 3 active, i.e Delete Cue 3 , you would only delete fixture 1 thru 5 from Cue 3. - if Cue 3 contains more fixtures than 1-5, the cue will not be deleted as a whole.

World 1 contains all parameters of the show, and cannot be altered or deleted

Concept: Tutorials

This is the tutorial section.

The tutorials here are designed to help you understand how the console works.

They start with the Basic tutorials and then moves into more specific areas (still work in progress).

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1

A short tutorial about creating a new show, patching dimmers, changing their values, making groups and creating simple cues in a sequence.

Welcome to this first Tutorial

This will give you a short tour through all the most basic things you need to know for creating a show, turn on channels, make groups, store cues and make your screens display the relevant data.

On a grandMA there are many different ways to get from A to B. But to get the best result with this tutorial, it’s important that you follow the steps fairly precise. You can always experiment on your own afterwards.

Mark-up in the tutorial.

I have chosen to use different markings when I want you to do different things.

If I need you to press a hard key (a key that is physically on the desk) it looks like this: Setup. If I’m just referring to the button I will put it in single quotation marks e.g.: 'Setup'.

If you are supposed to press a button on the screen or a area on the screens I will write it like this >>Macro 1<<.

If you are supposed to write text on the keyboard I will write it like this: Moving light. I will often tell you to end a command with 'Please'. This referrers to any of the two Please keys on the console (only one on the UltraLight).

When referring to a window on a screen you have created, I will mark it like this: CommandLine Feedback.

onPC vs. Console.

If you are doing this on an onPC , you need to imagine all the physical buttons, and use the relevant buttons in the program. I will write this as if you where at a real console (a FullSize).

A real FullSize console can have up to 6 screens (incl. 2 external). I will refer to them as "Screen 1", "Screen 2", etc.

Screen 1 is the 9" Multi Touch Screen. Screen 2 to 4 is the 15.4" touch screens on a FullSize (from right to left). 5 and 6 are the external screens.

If you are at a desk that only got one 15.4" touch screen, just ignore everything with screen 3 and 4. You will learn to store and recall screen views on the one screen you have. The same thing applies for the external screens. If you don’t have any, just use the one screen you do have.

Version

This tutorial is made on version 1.3. So it should be working on every version from and above this.

Happy Programming.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Create a New Show

Now we are going to create a new empty show.

The first this you need to do is the press the Backup key. Then make sure the >>Internal<< tab is selected.

Now press the >>New Show<< button.

This gives you the "New Show" pop-up. Here you can write the name of the show and change some options.

In the name box, write this: Tutorial_Basic_1

Make sure you check all the boxes in the pop-up. This ensures that we create a new empty show with all default options.

Your pop-up should look something like this:

Then you can press the >>Please<< button and close the "Backup" menu by pressing the yellow X in the upper right corner (this is how you always closes temporary windows.

You have how created a new empty show.

Go to the next page to learn to patch dimmers.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Patching Dimmers

Now we are going to add and patch 40 dimmer channels.

Do you want a show without lights? No, not really! I’ve made a simple design with some general stage wash.

This gives us a total of 40 dimmer channels. Press the Setup key and make sure the >>Show<< tab is selected. The press the >>Patch & Fixture Schedule<< button.

This gives you a pop-up is called "Layer Name". Here you write: Dimmers followed by a 'Please'.

Then a part of your screen should look like this:

Now you should press the button called >>Please select fixturetype<<.

Now we are going to import a fixture type from the library on the desk to the show.

Press the >>Add Fixturetypes from Library<<.

This is a list of all the fixture types in the library. We are going to use the manufacture filter to limit the list.

At the bottom of the page you'll find a box named "Manufacturer Filter". Here you write: generic.

Now you can only see the generic fixture types. At the bottom you'll also see a box called "Fixture filter", here you write dim.

The list is now limited to only display generic fixtures that has "dim" in its name.

Select the one called "generic@dimmer@00.xmlp".

The bottom of your screen should now look like this:

Press the >>Ok<< button and then the >> 'Dimmer'1 << button.

Now you'll get a series of pop-ups that help you adding new fixtures.

The first one asks for the quantity of fixtures. Write: 40 followed by a 'Please'.

Now it asks for the Channel ID. Write: 1 followed by a 'Please'. This gives the first dimmer an ID number of 1, the second one an ID of 2, etc.

Then you need to give your first dimmer a Fixture ID. We don't want a fixture ID so write 0 followed by a 'Please'.

Now we need to give the first dimmer a patch. Write: 1.1 followed by a 'Please'. This places the first fixture in universe 1 and DMX channel 1.

Now you are almost ready to add the fixtures. We just need to edit the name. Just press where it says >>Dimmer<< in the box called "Name".

Then you write: Dim 1 followed by a 'Please'. This names your dimmers "Dim 1", "Dim 2", etc.

Now it should look like this:

Press the >>Apply<< button. You have now added 40 dimmer channels.

Close the two setup screens using the yellow X.

On the next page we are going to look at controlling those channels.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Using Windows and Screens

Now we are going to have a look at windows.

Commandline Feedback Window

Often it can be a advantage to see how the console reacts to your commands. This is done on the Commandline Feedback window.

We are going to create this window at the bottom of screen 2 (the 15,4" touchscreen on the right side).

Press anywhere in the upper left corner on the empty screen. This gives you the "Create Basic Window" pop-up. Here you need to press the >>Other<< tab. Here you'll find a >>Command line<< button. Press it.

Now you have created a Commandline Feedback window.

It continually gives you a lot of information. Don't be confused about all the information, I'll tell you about it when you need it.

You can resize the window by pressing the area in the lower right side of the window (where there are a lot of yellow dots).

The window can be moved by pressing and holding the headline of the window (where it has a yellow ball and the "Commandline Feedback" text).

Now you should size and move your window so it takes up three whole lines at the bottom of the screen.

Channel Sheet

To view your 40 channels you need a Channel Sheet window.

Press the upper left corner on screen 2. Then select the >>Sheets<< tab in the "Create Basic Window" and then the >>Channel<< button.

You have now created a Channel Sheet. Here you can see your channels and the values they have.

Your screen should now look something like this:

Storing View

You can store your view on any of the view buttons in the side of your screen.

Now we are going to store our view on the top button just right to screen 2.

Press Store key followed by the V1 key.

This gives you a pop-up. It asks which screens you want to store. Without changing anything press the >>Please<< button.

You have now created a view. Let's give it a name.

Press Assign key twice followed by the V1. This gives you a pop-up. Here you write: Channel followed by a 'Please'.

You can see in your Commandline Feedback window writes this:

:Processed:Label ViewButton 1.1

This tells you that you have given your view a new label.

On the next page we are going to learn about controlling the values of the channels.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Controlling Channels

We are now going to take a look at controlling dimmer channels.

Turning on the channels.

There are many ways to turn on your channels on a grandMA. Let's begin with one of the simple ones. Press thise hardkeys: 1 At 1 0 0 Please. You have now turned on channel 1 at 100%. Let's look at what else happened. The channel ID "1" has changed to a yellow color and the background behind the value has changed to a red color. Also the value (in this case the intensity) is now in a red color. The yellow color means that the channel is selected and you can change the value. Press At 5 0 Please. Since the channel is already selected you can just give it a new value and it is now at 50%. Now press Clear once. Channel 1 is no longer selected and you can't just change the intensity again. The red background color indicates that the value will be saved if you press 'Store' (don't do it now). Instead press once more on Clear. The only thing left is the value in the red color. This means that it's still in the temporary memory (called the programmer), but it will not be saved if you store. Press Clear once more. Now channel 1 is turned off and it's not in the programmer anymore. Instead of pressing the 'Clear' button 3 times you can keep it pressed for about 1 second and you have cleared the programmer.

There are other ways to turn a channel at 100%. Here's another example: 1 At At. This is a shortcut to give the channel a value of 100%. Press . twice. This gives channel 1 a value of 0%. You can of course also use "At 0 Please". The value is in the programmer and will be stored (if you save a cue). Press Clear until the programmer is cleared. If you have several channels in the programmer and just what to "release" one, you can use the 'Off' button in combination with the 'Channel' button. Turn on channel 1 at 100%. Now press Off Channel 1 Please. The final way (I will introduce to you) is the "Level" wheel. With this you can change the value fast and simple. Turn it away from you and the value of the selected channels goes up. Turn it towards yourself and it goes down.

If you want to turn on several channels at the same time you need the buttons '+' and/or 'Thru'. They are pretty self-explanatory. Guess what you need to press to turn on channel 1 to 10 plus 20 at 20%. This is the fast way: 1 Thru 1 0 + 2 0 At 2 0 Please. If you want to exclude channels you can use '-' (minus). So if you want to give channel 1 to 10 plus 20 but minus 5 a value of 0%, this is the fastest way: 1 Thru 1 0 + 2 0 - 5 . . .

You can also use '+' and '-' to change the value. 5 At + 3 0 Please. This brings channel five up to 50%. 5 At - 5 0 Please. Brings the channel down to 0%.

Now you know how to assign values to channels. End this section by clearing your programmer.

On the next page we are going to look at Groups.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Group

Now it's time to have a look at groups.

Groups Pool

Since we are going to make some groups it would be practical to be able to see them.

I find it nice to have it at the same screen (since there's room). So I suggest making the Channel Sheet one line smaller and then press the empty space on the left side.

Again we are presented with the "Create Basic Window" pop-up. This time you need to access the >>Pools<< tab. Here we find the >>Groups<< button. Now you got some empty group buttons right at your fingertips. You could store this as a new view (or store your existing view again).

The first group

All the odd numbers in our light plot have a warm color and all the even ones have a cold color. We are going to make some groups with those colors. The first one is all the warm colors from front of house. Press: 5 + 7 + 9 + 1 1 Please . Now you have selected channel 5, 7, 9 and 11. Then press Store followed by the first available group button. Groups cannot contain any value so we don't need to assign any.

Before you do anything else, use your keyboard to write: FOH Warm. Should you have touched anything else (buttons, screens, anything) before typing, you can use a different method to name things (e.g. groups). The function is called "Label" and you access it by pressing the 'Assign' key twice. Do that and then press the first group button again. Now you have the option to change the name, delete it, or type it for the first time. When you are happy press Please”.

Look at your Channel Sheet. Here you can see that the numbers 5, 7, 9 and 11 have the yellow color, meaning that they are still selected. We are done with those four channels, so press the 'Clear' key once.

11 more groups

All right, now I have told you everything you need to know about making groups. In all we need 12 groups. I have gathered all the information you need for making the groups in a table. You have already made group 1, but the rest is a nice little exercise.

Group number: Channels: Name:
1 5 + 7 + 9 + 11 FOH Warm
2 17 + 19 + 21 + 23 LX1 Warm
3 25 + 27 + 29 + 31 LX2 Warm
4 33 + 35 + 37 + 39 LX4 Warm
5 1 + 3 + 13 + 15 Box Warm
6 All uneven numbers All Warm
7 6 + 8 + 10 + 12 FOH Cold
8 18 + 20 + 22 + 24 LX1 Cold
9 26 + 28 + 30 + 32 LX2 Cold
10 34 + 36 + 38 + 40 LX4 Cold
11 2 + 4 + 14 + 16 Box Cold
12 All even numbers All Cold

When you are done, your group pool should look something like this:

On the next page we will make the first cue.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Storing the First Cue

It's time to make the first cue.

A light cue is saved in a sequence. The grandMA can handle an almost unlimited number of sequence.

We only need one for this tutorial. All cue numbers are in numeric order i.e. cue number 4 cannot be before cue number 3. But the cue can have any name.

First of all we need a window where we can see our sequence. Click on the top left cell on one of your empty screens. If you only have one screen you need to clear it first (by deleting the windows already there) and then press the cell.

The window we need is called Sequence Executor, so in the "Create Basic Window" pop-up, select the >>Sheets<< tab and press the button called >>Sequence Executor<<. You could save this as a (new) view.

The first thing you should do is to select the first executor. Press:Select Exec 1 . You can always locate your selected fader by its green background color where it says "Seq". And to indicate that there is a sequence assigned to that fader the number underneath the fader is brighter. The green LED is on when the executor is on.

Let’s make our first cue. Press: 2 0 At 4 0 Please. Then Store Please. That was it! You have now saved channel 20 at 40% in cue 1 in sequence 1 at executor fader 1.

If you don’t specify anything else the console assumes you are referring to your selected executor and the sequence assigned to that executor. You can always locate your selected excutor by its green background color where it displays the sequence name (now it says "Seq 1").

You also got a line in your Sequence Executor window. Most of the columns are self-explanatory - but I will mention some of them. "Number" is of course the cue numbers. "Name" is the name. "Trig" describes what triggers the cue. If we look at our first cue, the trigger is "Go". This means that to execute the cue you need to press a Go key. "Delay", "Fade", "Out Delay" and "Out Fade" shows you the respective times.

Before we make any more cues, let’s change the cue name. If you don’t specify anything the desk names it "Cue". Press Assign Assign Cue 1 Please. Use the keyboard to write Behind Curtain followed by a 'Please'. A different way to change the cue name is to right click on the name with the mouse. No matter what way you choose - your first cue should now have the name "Behind Curtain".

If you can't see the entire name you can expand the column width by placing the mouse curser on the line that divides "Name" and "Trig". When you are at the right place, your curser changes so it now also has a little horizontal double ended arrow. Click and hold the left mouse button while you drag the mouse to your right. Then release the mouse button again. Now your Sequence Executor window should look something like this:

On the next page we are going to create more cues.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Creating More Cues

Now we are gonna make more cues.

Making more cues.

Let’s make some more cues. Press: 2 0 + 2 8 At 8 0 Store Cue 2 Time 1 5 Please . That created cue 2 with a fade time on 15 seconds. Let’s continue with cue 3. Now we’re going to use the groups and the command line.

You need to locate the Command Line. It looks like this:

[Channel]>

This is the CommandLine. It can be a fast way to get around the console and the commands. But sometime the keys are fastest. In the CommandLine type this:

[Channel]> g 1 + 2 at 75

followed by Please . Then type:

[Channel]> g 3 t 5 at 60

followed by Please . Now let's have a look at the commandline feedback and how the console has responded (please don't press any buttons).

What does all this mean? "g" is a short cut to "Group". That means the respond to the first line is:

:Processed:Group 1+2 at 75

The "t" in the second line as a short for "thru". The console respond to the second line is:

:Processed:Group 3 thru 5 at 60

We are gonna store the cue using the hardkeys: Store Time 2 0 Time 2 5 Please. This is the response from the console:

:Processed:Store BasicFade 20 BasicOutFade 25

Now why is this? We typed "Time 20 Time 25". The desk interprets this as 20 seconds (Basic)Fade and 25 seconds (Basic)OutFade. Pretty clever, huh?

Notice that after the second cue we don't need to specify the cue number. The desk automatically uses the next available number.

In cue 4 we need to take 30% of everything that is on. We do this in a fast and easy way: If Please At - 3 0 Store Time 1 0 Please .

That was fast! By using "If Please" you get the command "IfOutput", this selects everything that has output. Then using "At - 30" you subtract 30% from whatever value the channels had before (of course nothing less than 0%).

Now we're going to make a lot of changes: Group 6 . . Group 9 Thru 1 1 At 6 0 Please Group 7 + 8 At 7 5 Store Time 1 5 Time Time 5 Please .

What is "Time 15 Time Time 5"? If you have a look at your Command Line Feedback” it reads: "BasicFade 15 BasicDelay 5". This means that you told the desk to delay the execution of the cue with 5 seconds after you've pressed the "Go" button (and then fade at 15 seconds - but you probably guessed that).

With the "Time" command we can assign many different times. A command like: "Time 20 Time 15 Time 10 Time 5" the desk translates to: "BasicFade 20 BasicDownFade 15 BasicDelay 10 BasicDownDelay 5"!

The last cue we are going to make is a blackout. And we do that with only six button presses: If Please . . Store Please . That was our 6 cues. It was hopefully fast and painless.

The next page we are going to make some changes to the sequence.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 1 - Editing the Sequence

Now we are going to make some changes to the sequence.

Making a "Follow"

We would like to change cue 3 to automatically activate when cue 2 is done. You do this by right-clicking with the mouse (or pressing Edit and then) on the screen where it says "Go" in "Trig" column in the Sequence Executor sheet in cue 3.

This gives you a drop down box with the following choices: Go, Time, Follow, Sound & BPM. Select >>Follow<< by clicking or pressing it.

Then when cue 2 is done the desk automatically activates the fade to cue 3.

Changing the cue names.

Let's change the cue names. You know how to do this, so I just made a table:

Cue Number: Name:
1 Behind Curtain
2 With Curtain Up
3 Build
4 Darker
5 Cold
6 B.O.

If you need to, then expand the "name" column in your Sequence ExecutorSheet, so you can see the entire names.

Updating a cue.

Let's imagine that we’'ve got a lighting designer who has changed his mind. He wants 5% more on the group called "LX 1 Warm" in cue 3. Let’'s load cue 3: Goto 3 Time 0 Please .

What happened? We loaded a cue and activated the executor. And we now have a yellow frame on cue 3 in the Sequence Executor Sheet. To load cue 3 you only need to write "Goto 3 Please". We added "Time 0". This overwrites the fade times stored in the cue and we didn't have to wait for the cue to fade in.

Let’s move on: Group 2 At + 5 Please . Now the 'Update' button lights up. This means you can update the activated cue. Press Update and without worrying about anything press the U3 key (or where it says: "Tracking Update") so the button changes to "Update Cue Only". Now press the X6 key (or where it says "Update Cue") to update the cue. To exit the cue and deactivate the sequence you need to press the top button above executor fader 1.

Editing the times.

Let's change some of the times in the cue list. This is how your times should end up:

Delay Fade Out Delay Out Fade
. 0 . .
3 15 . .
. 20 . 25
. 10 . .
. 15 5 10
. 0 . .

Look at the Sequence Executor Sheet. Right click on the cells and type in the new value ether on "the calculator" on the screen, the buttons on your desk or using the keyboard. The final result should look like this:

Try pressing the big 'Go+' ”button to see how your channels react to the different times.

Press: Backup Backup (as double-clicking a mouse button). This is a fast way to store your show.

That was it! Now you know the most elementary things. You have leaned to create a show, make a simple patch, create views, turn on channels, save and use groups and finally creating a sequence with cues with different times.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2

This tutorial will introduce you to the skills you need for editing the patch, using fixtures, presets and worlds.

Welcome to the second basic Tutorial

This will give you a short tour through all the most basic things you need to know for adding fixtures to the patch, controlling fixtures, creating presets, adding a sequence and using worlds.

This tutorial builds on the first tutorial. I strongly recommend making that one first: Tutorial Basic 1.

On a grandMA there are many different ways to get from A to B. But to get the best result with this tutorial, it’s important that you follow the steps fairly precise. You can always experiment on your own afterwards.

Mark-up in the tutorial.

I have chosen to use different markings when I want you to do different things.

If I need you to press a hard key (a key that is physically on the desk) it looks like this: Setup. If I’m just referring to the button I will put it in single quotation marks e.g.: 'Setup'.

If you are supposed to press a button on the screen or a area on the screens I will write it like this >>Macro 1<<.

If you are supposed to write text on the keyboard I will write it like this: Moving light. I will often tell you to end a command with 'Please'. This referrers to any of the two Please keys on the console (only one on the UltraLight).

When referring to a window on a screen you have created, I will mark it like this: CommandLine Feedback.

onPC vs. Console.

If you are doing this on an onPC , you need to imagine all the physical buttons, and use the relevant buttons in the program. I will write this as if you where at a real console (a FullSize).

A real FullSize console can have up to 6 screens (incl. 2 external). I will refer to them as "Screen 1", "Screen 2", etc.

Screen 1 is the 9" Multi Touch Screen. Screen 2 to 4 is the 15.4" touch screens on a FullSize (from right to left). 5 and 6 are the external screens.

If you are at a desk that only got one 15.4" touch screen, just ignore everything with screen 3 and 4. You will learn to store and recall screen views on the one screen you have. The same thing applies for the external screens. If you don’t have any, just use the one screen you do have.

Version

This tutorial is made on version 1.3. So it should be working on every version from and above this.

Happy Programming.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - Adding Moving Lights

We are gonna store the show with a new name and add some moving lights to the patch.

Storing the show

Before we are doing anything else, we need to store the show with a new name.

But maybe you need to load the show from "Tutorial Basic 1" first.

Press the Backup key and then make sure you have chosen the "Internal" tab. Now press the >>Load Show<< button.

Locate your saved show from tutorial basic 1 in the list of shows. Make sure all the boxes on the right side is checked and then press the >>Ok<< button.

Now we have loaded the show (again).

Still in the Backup Menu, press the >>Save Show As<< button and in the pop-up write your name followed by this: _Tutorial_Basic2.

I use the name "John Doe" so I would write: JohnDoe_Tutorial_Basic2.

Now we have saved our show with a new name and we can close the Backup Menu using the yellow cross in the upper right corner.

Add new fixtures

We just got 9 Mac 700 Profiles from Martin Professional. And we want to add them to the patch. This is what the new light plot looks like:

All right, let's go. Press the Setup key then the >>Show<< tab and the >>Patch & Fixture Schedule<< button.

We want to add the fixtures in a new layer. So that's the first thing we are gonna add.

Make sure the "Layer" part (the left half) of the screen is selected (the headline has a bright blue background), and then press the 'Add' key (it's the X1 key)

In the pop-up write: Mac700.

Now press the 'Add' key again. And the press >>Please select fixturetype<<. Now press >>Add Fixturetypes from Library<< to import a new fixture type into the show.

The manufacturer is "Martin" and we need the "Mac 700 Profile" in extended mode:

When you have selected the correct fixture type press the >>Ok<< button. Back in the Select Fixture Type pop-up press the >>'Mac 700 Profile' 2<<.

The quantaty is "9".

For the Channel and Fixture ID we need them to start at "111". And the patch to begin at the second universe with DMX channel 1 (that makes the first fixtures patch number "2.1"). Change the name to "Mac700 1". And now press the >>Apply<< button.

But we are not quite done. We need to change some of the Channel and Fixture ID's to match the light plot. When you are done your fixture list should look like this:

And now we can exit both the Edit Setup pop-up and the Setup menu. This also saves your new fixtures.

Go to the next page to learn about the Fixture Sheet.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - Fixture Sheet

The Fixture Sheet is used for displaying all the attributes of the fixtures.

Now that we have fixtures it would be nice to see what they are doing. For this we are going to need the Fixture Sheet window.

I like the fixture sheet on screen 2. That way it's directy above the four encoders. But it's all up to you where you put it on the screens.

When you have room for it, press the empty space where you want your Fixture Sheet. In the Create Basic Windows pop-up you need to select the "Sheets" tab and then press the >>Fixtures<< button.

Now you have a Fixture Sheet. Here your fixtures are (as a default) represented as a list. Your fixture are in rows and the different attributes (like Dimmers, Pan/Tilt, Gobos, etc.) are sorted in columns.

When you press the yellow ball in the upper left corner of the sheet you get the sheet options (it's also here you can delete a window - if you haven't noticed).

You can follow the link below to read details about the Fixture Sheet. This is how my fixture sheet looks:

This is my sheet options:

Tools:

  • Preset Control - Off
  • Layer Control - On
  • Filter Control - Off
  • Multi Control - Off
  • ScrollBar Horizontal - Off
  • Scrollbar Vertical - Off

Layer Filter:

  • Layer - Preset Values
  • Filter - None
  • Feature Mask - Off

Display:

  • Sheet Style - Horizontal
  • Font - DejaVu 10
  • Readout - Percent
  • Symbol Output - On
  • Symbol Features - On
  • Cue Colors - On
  • Channel ID - On
  • Columns - 10
  • Feature Sort - On
  • Fixture Sort - Off

Feature Mask:

  • We are not gonna use Feature Mask, so they can just keep there default options.

On the next page we are going to have a look at how to control fixtures.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - Controlling Fixtures

Being able to control your fixtures is one of the most important things using a grandMA.

The Preset (type) Control Bar.

The key to control fixtures is this bar:

It's the "Preset Control" bar. With this you can control what preset type you have assigned to your encoders.

The bar will only display the preset types you have access to. you might have noticed that before we added the Mac 700's there was only the "Dimmer" button in the bar.

The bar might disappear when you move focus to something else. Like working in the Sequence Executor Sheet. But you can always bring it back by pressing somewhere in your Fixture Sheet or Channel Sheet.

Playing with the movers.

To control fixtures you need to select them. Let's try with fixture 111. Press: 1 1 1 Please.

This selects the fixture, and you can assign a dimmer value using the methods you learned in Tutorial basic 1. Or you can select the "Dimmer" preset type using the bar and turn the first encoder to turn up the lights.

Select "Position" by pressing it. Notice how your encoder changes function according to what preset type you have selected. With the "Position" your encoders look like this:

Turning the encoders changes the values. Turning them with the encoder pressed changes the value faster. if you want to make smaller movement with a turn (incresing the resolution) you can press the "Normal / Fine / Ultra" button next to the value.

Notice how some of the buttons in the Preset Control Bar have a red square and some a grey one. The red one indicates that you have changed values in that preset type. This will be saved if you press the 'Store' key (don’t do it).

Press the >>Gobo<< button. Now instead of turning the first encoder, just press it shortly. This is where the "calculator" proves its power. The "calculator" is the pop-up that allows you to input values to attributes using a graphic interface. This is what it looks like with "Gobo 1" selected:

Next to the usual buttons with numbers etc. there is a lot of buttons that changes according to your selections. When gobo is selected you have easy access to all the different gobos. Select the one called "Water" and confirm you choice by pressing 'Please'.

When our fixture has more than one gobo wheel you can choose the others by using the "Feature Select" button:

You can press the text (Gobo1) to scroll thru the possible features or the "up arrow" to se a small list of the possible choices:

The last thing I will introduce you to is how to control colors.

Press the Preset Type button "Color". The first thing you see is the attribute "Color Wheel 1". This works as all the other attributes.

Now try to select "ColorMix" using the "Feature Select" button. This assigns Cyan, Magenta and Yellow to the first three encoders (in that order). Then you can control these three attributes manually.

What it also does is gives you the possibility to press the "Show Specialized Dialog" button - press it now. It should brig you this window on screen 1 (the 9" multi touch screen):

It's three different ways to assign a color to your fixture. What you are currently looking at is the "Fader" window. Here you can control the gradiant color wheels using HSB (Hue, Saturation & Brightness), CMY (Cyan, Magenta & yellow) and/or RGB (Red, Green & Blue). They are all connected, so other faders will move when you are moving one.

Try to press the U2 key (or where it says "HSB"). This gives you this window:

This is much like the "ColorPicker" from grandMA series 1. You can choose a color by pressing anywhere in the colored area. You can also see how this affects your HSB, CMY and RGB values.

Try to press the U3 key (Swatch Book). The window changes to this:

This can be used to choose a color much like the ones in the books of the leading gel manufacturers.

Notice how your Fixture Sheet changes and always shows you what your fixture is outputting.

Take some time experiment with the fixture controls. When you’re done clear your programmer and move on to the next page.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - Preset Pool

A preset is a way to store a set of values. There a 10 different groups of presets. They are named "All", "Dimmer", "Position", "Gobo", "Color", "Beam", "Focus", "Control", "Shapers" & "Video". Basically the preset groups can only store their own kind of info i.e. the "Position" preset group can only store info about Position values.

The exception to this is the "All" presets. They can store info about all the types of values. The Preset Pool windows are a lot like the Group Pool window except if you have nothing selected the first time you press a preset button, the desk selects the fixtures/channels that can use that preset. If you press a second time the desk assigns the values (stored in the preset) to the fixtures/channels.

In this tutorial we are gonna use "All", "Position", "Gobo" and "Color" presets. How you arrange them is all up to you. You know how to create and store views.

But one thing that is good to know is that you can dicide what color the frame around the different preset pools should have.

You enter the Pool Options by pressing the yellow ball above the pool headline:

Here you'll find a something called "Frame Color". Pressing here followed by a press on any color in the options, changes the color on you pool frames.

When you are done, your view could look something like this:

On the next page we are gonna look at creating presets.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - Making Presets

Next we are going to make some presets.

Some preparations

In just a few seconds we are going to store a preset. But to make sure we save them correctly we need to examine the "Store options". Press and hold the Store key. After approx. 1 second the Store Options pop-up appears. The only thing we are interested in is the "Preset Options" they look like this:

Press the buttons until it looks like the buttons above. When you are happy press >>Save as Default<< next to the yellow X.

Finish by pressing the Esc key twice (we are not storing anything right now).

Creating presets (finally)

All right, try placing all your moving lights in different positions.

When you are happy, make sure you can se the preset group called "Position". Press Store and the first (Position) preset button.

Now instead of values our fixture sheet shows "P 2.1". This refers to Preset Pool 2, Pool Button 1. If you have given the preset a name, then this name will appear instead.

Move your lights to different position. Now press StorePreset 2 . 2 Please. This creates a second position preset. The "2 ." is a reference to the position presets (you may recall the window you created was called "2:Position").

Move your light and make one more position preset. Clear your programmer.

Select the first Mac 700 (Fixture 111). Change the color to a blue one using the Specialized Color Dialog. Press and hold the Store key. In the "Store Options" press the button "Selective" until it is changed to "Global". Now store it to the first color preset.

So what's the difference to the 2 different store options? All the Position presets we made with the "Selective" option. This means that the presets only applies to the fixtures that actually had values when you stored the preset. The "Global" means that this preset applies to all fixtures of the same fixture types even though you have only created it with some of them.

The last option "Universal" may be used to make presets that applies also to other fixturetypes than the one(s) used for creation. this functionallity applies only to the generic attributes dimmer, pan, tilt and colormix.

Make 2 more color presets. Make 3 different gobo presets. Clear your programmer.

Press: 1 1 1 Thru 1 3 3 PleasePleasePleaseStorePreset 0 . 1 Please. Now you have made an "All" preset that contains all the default values of the fixtures (The "Please Please Please" activates all parameters of the fixtures).

Pressing Please multiple times without entering any commands, will activate/deactivate all parameters of the current selection.

You should have presets that look something like this (I have rearranged the view so all the created presets are visible):

This is what we need for making our new second sequence. Go to the next page to do that.

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - A Second Sequence

We are gonna create a second sequence and link the two sequences.

Making the second sequence.

Clear your programmer. Press the first Position preset twice. Now press Store and one of the buttons labelled "3" around executor fader 3.

Now we got our second sequence. Let’s build some more into it. Select executor fader 3 by pressing Select followed by one of the executor buttons around the executor fader. Press the first Gobo and Color presets followed by Store Please. Then we got the Save pop-up:

Here you choose how you want to store things. Press >>Merge<<.

That was our first cue. Clear the programmer. Press the second Position twice followed by the second Gobo and Color presets and then Store Please. This time choose >>Create second Cue<< in the Save pop-up.

Make a third cue with the third Position, Gobo and Color presets.

The last cue I need you to make is a cue containing the "All" preset and all the cue times need to be 0 seconds! Clear your programmer.

Setting up the sequences (Assign Menu).

Select your first sequence. Now press the green name field above the executor fader (where it says "Sequ."):

On screen 1 you see some of the options for that executor fader. This window can be a bit confusing the first you see it, but right now we are only interested in is the size of the executor. Change that to 2 by pressing the X2 key (or where it says "Width 2").

Now we need to change the button assignment. The buttons and fader can have a lot of different functions (explaining those goes beyond the scope of this tutorial). Press where it says "XF" and in the small pop-up select >>Speed<<.

Press where it says >>GoBack<< and choose the option called >>Rate 1<<. Change the rest of the buttons so they end up looking like this:

Close the Assign Menu by using the yellow X. What is a Speed rate fader? Well, the speed fader is used for changing the overall speed of the fade. You can speed it up or slow it down to a complete stop. The times are not changes in the sequence permanently, just adapted to the faders position.

The button called "Rate1" resets the fader to the mid position, where all the times are back at their saved times.

The '<<<' and '>>>' steps one cue back and forward accordingly without time.

Linking and editing the 2 sequences.

Have you noticed that we didn’t save any dimmer values to the fixtures in the second sequence? We are going to put those in our first sequence. And we are going to do some sequence linking.

In your Sequence Executor window make sure you can see the "Cmd" (command) column.

Right-click in the "Cmd" cell for cue 1 and in the pop-up write: Goto cue 1 exec 1.3 followed by a 'Please'. In the "Cmd" cell for cue 3 right-click and write: Goto cue 2 exec 1.3also followed by a 'Please'. In cue 4 the command is for cue 3 on executor 1.3. And in cue 6 we need a command to cue 4. When you’re done it should look like this:

Now press the big Go+ key. Notice that booth sequences go to cue number 1. That’s the command doing its trick.

Press the >>> executor button. Turn on your moving light at full. Press Update. Press the U1 key (or where it says "Original Content Only") followed by the X10 key (or where it says: "Save as Default").

Now there are two possible sequences to update. Make sure you update the one called "1.1 sequ.". You can do this by pressing the correct line.

Go to cue 6. Notice that the moving light gets the dimmer value "p 0.1". This is actually the value 0%. But to make sure that no matter what, they go to 0, let’s store this value in the first sequence also. Press: 1 1 1 Thru 1 3 3 . . Update. Now you can see that you also have the option to update the preset. Don’t do that; just update the cue in sequence 1.

Clear your programmer and try moving back and forward in your sequence to see how the link works.

On the next page we are going to have a look at "Worlds".

Topic: Tutorial Basic 2 - Using Worlds

Working With Worlds and last thoughts.

One last little treat for you is the worlds. You can use the worlds to limit your own (and others) access to channels or fixtures. Find a empty space on your screens and create a new window called Worlds(it's in the "pools" section).

Press: 1 Thru 4 0 Please Store followed by the second world button. Name it "Dimmers".

Clear your programmer. Now press: 1 1 1 Thru 1 3 3 Please Store followed by world button number three. Name this "Moving Lights".When you are done it should look something like this (remember you can change the frame color):

Now you actually got three worlds! The two you created and then there is a default world called "Full". This one can't be changed. It will always give you the full world.

Select >>Dimmers<<. Now try to press: 1 1 1 Please. It doesn’t work and they have disappeared from the fixture sheet.

If you select >>Moving Lights<< you can’t control the dimmers.

You can still run sequences and the cues will load all their content (Dimmers and Moving Light) as if you were in the "Full" world. The only effect the worlds have is what you can select, manipulate and store.

Last Thoughts

You should save your show. you can do this in the command line:

[Channel]>saveshow

That was it! You have leaned to make changes to the patch, controlling fixtures, creating and use presets, linking sequence and creating and use worlds.

Topic: Macros Introduction

This tutorial indends to give some insight to the possibilities of grandMA2 Macros

Macros are basically lines of text, which are executed as command-line for processing. The power of macros is based on the power of the command-line.

To learn macros, you need to learn the grandMA2's commandline-syntax.

The first step to learn grandMA2 commandline-syntax is to always have a Commandline Response Window visible on one of your screens:

Most of your action on the console will result in an entry in this window, and will be listed as Done , Realtime or Macro:

:Done:Channel 1 At 50
:Realtime: Go Executor 1.1.201
:Macro:Off Executor 1 Thru 10

You do not have to worry about these 3 different classifications for now. This indicates the source of the processed command, Realtime means that the command originated from your pushing executorbuttons and has been processed with a high priority, while Macro means that the command is originating from a direct hardkey, macro or cue-link etc and not via the normal user-input commandline, - which is indicated with Done.

Example:

Let's press the onscreen button above the encoders labeled "Position", to change the encoder to Pan/Tilt.

The encoders change to pan & tilt, and we see that the console has processed the following command:

:Done:PresetType "Position"

So lets create a macro that does exactly this.

  • type Edit Macro 1 followed by Please to open the Macro Editor and create a new macro, Macro 1
  • press Add (X1) to add a new line for our macro
  • click on the empty field in the text-column, and with your keyboard type the command we saw the desk had processed:
  • PresetType "Position" and press Please

  • Close the Editor with the "X" in the upper right corner
  • Open a Macro Pool Window, and you should see our Macro 1 as the first item
  • Label the macro by pressing 2 times on the Assign key, to get the Label keyword, the press on the Macro 1 button in the pool.
  • Enter "Position" in the popup, and press Please

We now have a Macro called "Position", that will call the Pan&Tilt Encoders, and we may assign it to an Executor, view or User-keys for easy hardkey access:

  • Switch to userkeys by pressing User 1, then type Assign Macro 1X1

You have now created your first basic macro. The following pages will learn you more about how to create complex macros.

Topic: Macro CommandLineInteraction

How your macro interact with your command-line

CommandLine Interaction (CLI)

A macro-button has several ways to interact with your command-line.

Lets say we have a Macro 5, with the command-line text "Highlight". Pressing this Macro, the following are processed by the console:

:Done:Macro 5
:Macro:Highlight

- the result is that Highlight is enabled/disabled, as expected.

But opposed to the normal Highlight Hardkey, you cannot operate this button without destroying what you currently are entering in the command-line. This is because the press of the Macro-button is interacting with your command-line - the macro is called via your normal command-line-input.

Open the Macro Editor, and disable the CLI option (X6) for Macro 5, close editor. Then try to press the macro-button again:

:Macro:Macro 5
:Macro:Highlight

The push of your macro-button is now processed directly. You can operate it and turn Highlight on and off at any time, even if you are in the middle of entering some other commands.

So let us try to Edit the macro again by pressing Edit and the macro-button.

It is not possible anymore! Even if we have Edit in the commandline, pressing the macro just turns Highlight On and Off.

When we disabled CLI, we told the console that this macro-button should not interact with our commandline, so it does not react to our Edit Command either.

Don't' worry, the disabled CLI only applies to buttons in the pool, and when the Macro is assigned to an Executor or View-button. By using the commanline we can still tell the console that we want to edit this macro, via the Macro keyword, and the ID of the Macro.

Enter Edit Macro 5 in the command-line, followed by Please, to open the Editor when CLI is disabled.

Appending text (@-sign)

Lets say we have a Macro 3, with the commandline text "Fixture 15". Pressing this Macro, the following are processed by the console:

:Done:Macro 3
:Macro:Fixture 15

- the result is that Fixture 15 gets selected, as expected.

What if we want to do something else with Fixture 15, than selecting it? can the Macro we made be used for this as well?

e.g. The syntax Edit Fixture 15 usually gives the dialog for changing patch and default-values for Fixture 15, so as our macro basically does "Fixture 15", how can we use the macro to get the dialog to patch Fixture 15?

Pressing Edit, then the Macro button, we are editing Macro 5, not editing Fixture 15.

To be able to interact with the content of the macro, we need first to disable the macro-button's own CommmandLine Interaction (CLI), as in previous example, then we need to make sure that the macro-text "Fixture 15" is appended to whatever is in the Command-line. Appending a macro-line to the users existing commandline is done by starting the macroline with the @-sign:

You may also use the @-sign at the end of the macro-line, to indicates that the macro shall wait for the user to append some more text, before the line is processed.

By adding the @-sign both in the beginning and at the end, a singleline macro is effectively just putting text into the commandline.

Topic: Using Variables

Variables are containers of text that may be reused

Variables may be used to store phrases of text, for later reuse by commandline and macros, similar to what Presets are for Attributes.

Variables are defined via the SetVar keyword and the dollar-sign:

SetVar $nameofvariable="content of variable"

Whenever the variable is later referenced in the commandline, the variable is replaced by its content.

Example:

A common way to program lighting for a song, is to create a sequence of cues holding the base-looks and major changes for each verse and chorus, and additionally trigger diffferent chasers on and off via command-links in the main sequence:
  • ...
  • Cue 5:"Chorus":Cmd:Go Executor 201
  • Cue 6:"Verse 2":Cmd: Off Executor 202
  • etc.

If only one chaser needs to be triggered, this simple syntax usually does the job.

By using variables, triggering of multiple chaser may be easily managed:

  • Cue 1:"Intro":Cmd:SetVar $chorusChasers="Executor 201 + 204 + 205"
  • ...
  • Cue 5:"Chorus":Cmd:Go $chorusChasers
  • Cue 6:"Verse2":Cmd:Off $chorusChasers
  • etc
[Channel]>SetVar $chorusChasers="Executor 201 + 204 + 205"
:Done:SetVar $chorusChasers="Executor 201 + 204 + 205"
[Channel]>Go $chorusChasers
:Done:Go Executor 201 + 204 + 205
Your console will only process valid commands. If none of the Executors exist, the console will not bother to process the command, and you will not see this last line

Similar to the SetVar keyword is the SetUserVar keyword. The only difference is that a variable defined with the SetVar is global for all users, while variables defined with SetUserVar applies to the current user only.

With the keyword ListVar and ListUserVar, the Commandline Response Window will list current variables and their content.

[Channel]> ListVar
:Global: $CHORUSCHASERS = Executor 201 + 204 + 205

Topic: Creating popup dialogs in macros

How to use dialogs to prompt for user-input to a macro

Sometimes you may want to create a macro that collects data from the user while running.

As we learned in the CLI part of this tutorial, you may use the @-sign to combine macro-lines with user-interaction. The @ approach is convenient when the user knows how the macro works and don't want to be bothered by popups, but if one were to create a more wizzard-like macro, using popup-dialogs enables guided interaction.

Popups are created by the use of parantheses - round brackets :

The text inside the parantheses are used as text prompted to the user, while the response entered by the user will replace the parantheses and the prompting text.

Example:

SetVar $universe=("Which Universe?")

SetVar $address=("Which Address?")

Assign Dmx $universe .$address At Selection

In the third line, please notice the space after $universe, and no space between dot and $address

Running this macro the console first promts for universe:

then for Address:

Processed, our macro looks like this:

:Macro:SetVar $universe="1"
:Macro:SetVar $address="401"
:Macro:Assign Dmx1 .401 At Selection

DMX channel 401 of Universe 1 is added to the patch of the currently selected fixture.

When you are using popups to assign text to variables, you should use qoutes inside the parantheses: ("What is your name?") but when using popups for commands and numbers, do not use quotes inside the parantheses: Goto Cue (where should i go)

Topic: Conditional Expressions

Conditional execution of macro-lines

In some situation you may want to only process a command, if the user has answered something specific in a popup, or if a variable is set to a specific value.

The grandMA2 supports simple conditional expressions, which must resolve to "True" for the following commandline to be executed.

SetVar $answer=("really delete all groups? yes/no")

[$answer=="yes"] Delete Group Thru

Conditional expressions are recognized by Square Brackets, and accept the following logical operators:

a == b
a equals b
a > b
a greater than b
a < b
a less than b
a <= b
a less than or equal b
a >= b
a greater than or equal b

The two arguments a and b are not compared as numbers, but as text-strings, character by character, e.g. "61" is considered to be greater than "599", as 6 is larger than 5.

Topic: Timing of Macros

As you may have noticed within the Macro-editor, in addition to the command-text field, there is also a time-field for each macro line.

By default the macro will proceed immediately and start processing the next line, however this "Follow" may be changed to either a Wait-time in seconds, or a trigger to pause and wait for next Go, before the macro proceeds with next line.

Wrong timing is the major pitfall when creating complex macros. The console is multi-tasking so when a command immediately follows another, the second command will start processing, even if the previous has not yet finished processing.

If a macro-line depends on an earlier line, to be processed correctly, you may need to add a wait-time, to prevent the next command to follow immediately and be processed too early.

Example:

Let's create a Macro that Parks Channel 10 at 50%:

Channel 10 At 50

Park Channel 10

With the default "Follow" trigger, this macro does not work. Setting channel 10 to 50% takes some time, and our macro Parks the channel before the first line has been fully processed.

Giving the first line 50 millisecond to be processed, before proceeding to the next line, solves the problem in this case:

When creating complex macros it is wise to start with a timing of i.e. 100 milliseconds per line, unless you are sure that the lines that do not rely on previous lines to be fully processed.

Necessary processing-time is not fixed. You may experience that a timing that worked when in Standalone is not enough in a session with multiple stations and NPU's

Topic: Automate Settings

Macros are useful if you easy want to change specific setting of your showfile, without the need to navigate thru multiple windows every time.

Lets try to make a Macro that toggles ETC Net2 on/off.

This setting is usually found under Setup > Network > Dmx Protocols > ETC Net2.

First we need to find this object in the Showfile object tree:

[Channel]> List

Index number 4 "DMX_Protocols", which have (6) childs/subobjects looks promising, lets examine it by enter this destination with the CD keyword, and do List a second time:

[Channel]>CD 4

DMX_protocols> List

Index number 2, "ETC Net2" seems to do what we need. It as a green (editable) property "Active" with no value, lets try to change this value to "on" via normal Assign syntax:

DMX_protocols> Assign 2 /Active=on

and List again to check if it worked:

DMX_protocols> List 2

Now that we know where the object is in the showfile, (from Root, then index 4 then index 2), and we know how to change it (/Active=on ) we may exit to Root destination, and create our macro

DMX_protocols> CD /

[Channel] Edit Macro 1

And enter what we have learned

Notice the Go trigger in the time Column, to have the next line wait for the next macropress, to make this a toggling two state button.

Finally you could add some sugar and change the Macro label to indicate the status of this macro (has it just switch on or off the ETCNet)

Topic: Macro Import and Export

If you have created a nice macro you would probably want to use it in other showfiles.

The current solution for this is to Export the Macro, then Import the Macro after loading the other showfile.

[Channel]>Export Macro 3 "Nice_macro.xml"

will create an xml-file labeled "Nice_macro" containing your macro, in the Macro-directory of your console.

to Import macros you need to change your commandline destination to macros:

[Channel]>CD Macro

then import the file with the following syntax

Macros/Global >Import "Nice_macro"

Macro(s) in the file "Nice_macro" will be imported and added after the last of your exising macros.

To list the files in your Macro-library, the current keyword is ListMacroLibrary

Macros/Global >ListMacroLibrary
: nice_macro 1234 Bytes
: predefined 5678 Bytes

Export and Import applies to the currently Selected Drive. To i.e. Export to USB-stick, enter SelectDrive to find the drive-ID of your Stick, then select the drive with the syntax SelectDrive [ID].

Remember to change destination to root with CD / when you are finished

You can also Export multiple macros in one xml-file, by exporting a range of macros to one file.
Import/Export currently do not support preservation of Macro ID. macros are imported after your last used Macro ID, in other words if you last current macro is Macro 245, the imported macros will become Macro 246 and upwards

Topic: Tutorial FixtureTypes

FixtureTypes are definitions used by the console to generate Fixtures in Patch & Fixture Schedule. Even though the grandMA2 comes with an extensive FixtureType Library, you might want to create your own or edit an existing type.

Topic: Create a new FixtureType

In this tutorial we are going to make a FixtureType for the Clay Paky Golden Scan 4.

The first thing to do, is to get hold of the manual with DMX-specifications of this fixture from the manufacturer

golden_scan4_manual_Rv1.pdf

Then we enter Setup Show Patch & FixtureSchedule

If your showfile is empty, you will be prompted with two popups, - cancel these by pressing the "X" in the upper right corner.

Continue by pressing the softkeys FixtureTypes , then Add , to create a new one.

The next to do is to populate the empty fields, and describe our fixture (longName, ShortName etc)

We leave ModelScale at 1, and ModelKey empty, and press the softkey Edit, to open the FixtureType Editor.

Our next task is to examine the spec of the GoldenScans functions:

Press Add , and press Edit and then the "none" (or right-click the "none") in the Attrib column. In the popup-dialog select Beam Beam1 Iris .

Your editor should now look like this:

Repeat Add & edit of Attributecolumn with the following attributes:

Do not add the two last Functions listed by Clay Paky, Pan Fine and Tilt fine.

Our next task is to Edit the Coarse and Fine column, and enter the DMX-channel for each function according to the first column in the Clay Paky List. When finished, your editor should look like this:

The next step is to add default-values for each function. By default, the range of each function is 0 - 100%, so we enter the defaults as a percentage value.

Examining the manual, I find that I should change the default from zero for the following functions

At the same go, we also adjust the Highlight-values. Highlight values is personal preferences, basically I want the fixture to be Open White, but don't affect i.e gobo so I choose my Highlight values to be:

We have now created a very basic GoldenScan4, with the minimum data needed, to control this fixture, so we should now close the editor, connect the fixture to the console, patch and test that the each function work.

If you do not have the fixture available, you may patch and look at the DMX Sheet window to check that your encoders controls the correct DMX-channels.

Topic: Tutorial Fixtures

Topic: Fixture Position Calibration Dialogue Tutorial

There are three different modes for this dialogue: Absolute mode, relative mode and free mode. These modes only differ in the way the parameters of your physical points A,B,C and D are entered.

Calibration Workflow

  1. Mark 4 physical points A to D on your stage. The 4 points have to span a rectangle.

  2. Enter the physics of point A to D depending on the mode:
    • Absolute mode: Select all fixtures and enter the coordinates of point A (X,Y,Z) and the correct distances to the points B and D.
    • Relative mode: Select all fixtures and enter the correct distances between Point A and the right and front edge of stage and the correct distances to the points B and D.
    • Free mode: Select all fixtures and enter the correct coordinates of point A (X,Y,Z), B (X,Y,Z), C (X,Y,Z)

  3. Focus each fixture to position A using pan and tilt attributes.

  4. Select all fixtures again and press the Store button followed by the soft button A. The position of the current selection will be stored for point A.

  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for points B, C and D.

  6. Select all fixtures again and press the soft button Calibrate. The physical positions of all selected fixtures are calibrated now.

It is possible that each individual fixture can be calibrated within a separate physical rectangle. An asterisk '(*)' means that the parameters of the rectangles are not equal across current selection.

Topic: Effects Tutorials.

On the following pages we are going to explore some of the ways you can use effects.

We will go through steps that introduce you to the most common effect functions.

Effect Theory

But before doing a lot of programming, we need to have a look at the theory behind the effects.

Effects run in an loop between two values. This uses a 'Form' to change between the values over a period of time.

A form could be a sine curve:

In the effect editors we have two options to look at values. One is 'low' / 'high' the other is 'Center' / 'Size'. In the following tutorials we are going to look at both methods.

When using 'Low' / 'High' mode, then bottom part of the form is 'Low' and the top part is 'High'. When using the other method, the 'Center' value will define a value to move over and under. It's the horizontal center line in the picture above. The 'Size' value will make the form bigger or smaller.

In cues and in the programmer, the speed of the effect is often controlled by the 'Speed' value. This can be modified with a 'Rate' or 'Speed' master.

If you need to spread out a group of fixtures to begin different places in the effect loop you need to use 'Phase'. Phase is often described as a number between 0 and 360. Think of the loop as a circle, and the numbers as a number of degrees on that circle.

And this is basically what you need for an effect.

Some forms can also use parameters like 'Width', 'Attack' and 'Decay'.

'Width' controls how much the form should occupy the cycle. A 'Width' of 100% makes the form take up all the time in the cycle. If the 'Width' is only 50% then the form only occupies the first half of the cycle.

'Attack' And 'Decay' is used to 'fade' values in forms that doesn't normally fade (Random, PWM (Pulse Width Modulator) and Chase).

The effect tutorials.

In the following tutorials we will look at:

  • Creating an effect in the programmer.
  • Creating a template effect.
  • Making effects using presets.
  • Using effects in cues.
  • Editing effects using the command line.
  • Changing an effect with a macro.
  • Different ways to run and use effects.

You will get the best result if you follow the steps precisely. You can always save your show, play around, and then return to your saved show.

Go to the next page for setting up a new show with some fixtures.

Topic: Setting up the show.

We are going to setup a new show with usable fixtures.

For the different effect tutorials we need a new empty show, that doesn't have any leftovers (no default setting and user settings) from previous shows.

Setting up the show.

I will not go into details of how to do this (it's outside the scope if this tutorial).

Create a completely empty new show.

Name it "Tutorial Effects" followed by your name.

Create 10 "Mac 700 Profile Extended" from Martin Lighting.

Place then in one line, 5 meters above the floor facing down. They need to have approx. 1 meter between them. Ca. in the middle of the room. They need to be hanged so fixture 1 is at the stage right and they all follow in number, ending with fixture 10 at the stage left.

Create views that gives you a fixture sheet (with the Layer Control Bar turned on), color presets and an Effect pool.

And it might be nice with a view with the "Stage" window.

What's next

That's it. Now you are ready to go to the next tutorial page.

Topic: Make an effect in the programmer.

In this tutorial we are going to create an effect in the programmer and store it as an Effect Preset in the Effect Pool.

You should have a new show for this tutorial. On the previous page we went through the setup we need for these tutorials.

When working with effects in the programmer there are some elements that are vital for controlling what's going on.

In the fixture sheet you need to turn on the 'Layer Control bar'. In this bar you'll find some buttons. Press the magenta 'Effect Layers' button so the bar looks like this:

These buttons allows you to control what part of the effect you are controlling with your encoders.

We are also going to use the 'Encoder Effect Toolbar'. It's the one above the encoders (bottom of screen two). This is what it looks like when you are in the Effects Layers:

This is used to control what parameters we are working on and assign values to the parameters.

On the Encoder bar you'll see the 'Special Dialog' button. Pressing it opens (and closes) the Effect Editor on screen 1. It could look like this:

Here we can work with effects in a more dynamic way. We are going to use this editor when creating our effect.

Building the effect

We are going to build an effect that moves the fixtures in a circle. This looks like a figure of 8 when the heads pointing strait down. But when moved off center it becomes a circle.

It's going to be a nice slow movement.

Select all your fixtures by any means you like. I prefer using the keys (Fixture Thru Please). It's important for this tutorial that you select them in the correct order, starting with 1 and finishing with 10.

Make sure you select the 'Position' button in the Encoder Toolbar. And open the Special Effect Dialog.

On the right side of the editor you'll see a 'Pan' and a 'Tilt' button. They have an on or off status. When they are on they have yellow text and a dark yellow background color.

We are going to add some value for both Pan and Tilt. So go ahead and select both of them.

Now press right under where it says 'Speed'.

This opens the calculator. Here we can type the desired speed. You also have the possibilities to select some predefined values. We are going to make an effect with a 4 seconds cycle. That means we need to select the '15 BPM' option.

We also need to spread the fixtures across the effect cycle (Phase). This means that the fixtures will do the same movement, but will be spread out over the entire loop cycle.

Press right under where it says 'Phase'. This again opens the calculator. Here you need to select the '0 THRU -360' option. This takes the amount of fixtures and spread them evenly across the cycle. Because of the way the mathematics work If you want a movement from left to right (looking at the stage) you need to choose the negative (minus) 360 option, not the '0 THRU 360' (positive 360).

At the lower part of the editor you'll see different buttons.

There are two buttons we need to look at.

The one in the lower right corner should say 'Val. Readout Center/Size'. If it doesn't then press it until it does.

The other button is also in the lower row (number four from the right). It can say 'Relative' or 'Absolute'. We need it to say 'Relative'

'Relative' refers to how the values are applied. This key toggles between 2 modes, 'Absolute' and 'Relative'. When it's 'Absolute', the values we use are absolute values. The effect will use those values only. If you change to 'Relative', it will use those values as a reference according to its current location. E.g. if a 'Dim' attribute has a 'Low' value of '10' and a 'High' of '50' and mode is 'Absolute'. Then the effect will cycle between 10% and 50% no matter what dimmer value the fixtures was assigned. If mode is 'Relative', then the cycle between 10% and 50% will use the actual value in the Value layer as a base, and Low and High will be put on top of it. E.g. setting the value of the dimmer to 25%, the cycle of 10% to 50% will result in an output of 35% to 75%.

Now we need to make some changes to the Pan parameter only. So press the 'Tilt' button, to deselect it. Make sure that you only have selected the Pan parameter.

Now press where it says 'Form'. In the pop-up you need to select the one called 'Circle'. In the next small pop-up, select the second line called '18.2 Circle'.

Then we need to change the size value. Press where it says 'Size'. Change the value to '60'.

Now we need to make some changes to the tilt parameter only. Make sure you have selected the 'Tilt' button only.

Press the 'Form' again. Here you also need to select the 'Circle' form. But in the small select pop-up you need to select the top line ('18.1 Circle').

We need to change the size to '40'.

Now the fixtures are moving. But for us to see that in the Stage window, you need to turn them on. Do this by pressing the At key twice. Remember that when the fixtures are pointed strait down, then move in a figure of 8 (it's how the mechanics work).

This dimmer value won't be stored when we store the effect. This is because it isn't an effect value.

Now you can see all the light move.

This is basically all we need for our effect.

Let's store what we got. Write this in the command line:

[Channel]>Store Effect 1 "Move Effect"

Followed by a Please.

Now let's check that it worked.

Clear you programmer. Press the effect pool button twice and the turn the fixture on.

Now everything should be moving as before.

Try to tilt your fixtures forward to something like a tilt value of "25" and you will see that it changes from a figure of 8 to a circle.

The effect we have just created is a "Selected" effect. This means that it will only work on the fixtures we had selected when we created the effect.

What's next?

On the next page we are going to create a template effect using the Effect Editor pop-up.

Topic: Make a template effect using the Effect Editor.

This tutorial makes a template effect using the effect editor pop-up.

The effect we are going to make is a dimmer chase that snaps to 100% and then fades back to 0%.

If you haven't done the previous effects tutorial I'll strongly urge you to do so.

The Effect Editor pop-up.

Make sure your programmer is empty, by pressing the Clear button for more than 3 seconds.

Now press the Edit key followed by the second effect pool button.

This gives you the Effect Editor pop-up. This is currently empty:

To make an effect you need to add an effect line with the 'Dim' attribute.

Press the 'Add' button and in the 'Select Effect Attribute' you need to select 'Dim' and then 'Confirm'.

This gives us the effect line we need:

We can edit the value here, but the nice way to edit this is by pressing the 'Edit Effect Line'. This is what it looks like:

This looks very much like what we used in the first effects tutorial.

Now we need to make some changes to the effect.

You need to change the form. Press where it says form. In the pop-up we need to select the 'PWM' Form.

The standard default speed is a bit fast. Let's change it to 30 BPM.

Since we want the effect to go from 0% to 100%, that needs to be our two absolute values. This is done using the buttons in the lower part of the editor. Here you'll find a button called ether 'Line Relative' or 'Line Absolute'. This button need to say 'Line Absolute'. The other button will say 'Val.Readout Center/Size', 'Val.Readout Auto' or 'Val.Readout Low/High'. This need to be 'Val.Readout Low/High'.

Now we can make sure the 'Low' value is '0' and the 'High' value is '100'.

Instead of all the fixtures to do the same, we want to spread the values evenly across the fixtures. To do this we need the 'Phase From' to be '0' and the 'Phase To' to have a value of '360'.

The standard 'Width' is 100% but, we would like it to be more dark than bright. So moving the 'Width' fader down to '15%' gives us the desired look.

Now all we need is to make it fade out. This is done by turning the 'Decay' up to '100'.

That's it! we have now created a template effect using the Effects Editor.

And since we started by editing an (empty) effect all our changes are automatically stored (or actually updated) in the effect. So you can close all the editors (always a good idea when you are done).

But we should label it. Press the Assign button twice followed by effect pool button number 2. Label it "Dim Effect".

Now we can test it. Select all the fixtures and press the pool button. The effect should now be running.

What we have created is a template effect. Notice on the pictures above that the QTY (quantaty) column says "0". This means that there are no fixtures assigned. So all fixtures that have a 'Dim' parameter can use this template effect. When you choose some fixtures and then assign this effect, you copy the information in the effect pool to the selected fixtures. This information is now in your programmer and can be saved. If you store this in a cue and later change the template effect, these changes will not be used in the cue. This is only transferred to the cues (like presets) when the effect is "Selected" and not "Template".

What's next?

Next we are going to take a look at using presets in effects.

Topic: Make an effect using presets.

In this tutorial we are going to create a new color effect using color presets.

If you haven't done the previous effects tutorials I'll strongly urge you to do so.

Setting up for this tutorial.

Before we begin making this tutorial, you need to make two different color presets using the CMY attributes. It's very important that you make Color presets or All presets that uses only the CMY parameters (you can use other parameters- but that's not the point with this tutorial).

I made an Orange color presets and named it 'Orange', I know - it's the logic choice:-). And a blue preset - guess what I called that one (yes - 'Blue' is the correct answer).

Making the effect.

We have gone through many of the elements we need for making this effect. The new thing is that instead of using 'Low' / 'High' or 'Center' / 'Size' values, we are going to use references to color presets.

This means that to change colors, you don't need to change the effect - you can simply change the presets. Ergo: business as usual with presets.

Make sure your programmer is empty.

Select all your fixture and then make sure the 'Effect Layer' is selected. Then you need to select the 'Low' layer.

Then you can press the first (Orange) preset.

Now select the 'High' layer and then the other (Blue) preset.

Now all the fixture are at the same place in the effect cycle. We would like the fixture to be distributed out on the cycle.

Select the 'Phase' layer and the 'Color' Preset type and the 'ColorMix' feature. Next to this there's a 'Link' button - press this until it says 'Link Feature'.

Now press the first encoder under the 'CM1' attribute. In the calculator pop-up select '0.0 thru -360.0'. With 'Link Feature' this phase should also be applied to 'CM2' and 'CM3'.

Now press Store followed by the third effect pool button. And label the new effect 'Color Effect'.

And that's it! Test it by clearing your programmer. Then press the effect twice and turn on the lights:

The image above displays my result. There is a magenta color in the transition between the orange and blue. But that's what happens when you fade between the two colors.

If you now change the color in the presets, the effect will use the new color.

What's next?

In the next effect tutorial, we are going to have a closer look at running effects in a sequence.

Topic: Using effects in cues

In this tutorial we are going to have a closer look at how to use effects in cues.

If you haven't done the previous effects tutorials I'll strongly urge you to do so.

In this tutorial we are going to use the color effect we just created in the previous tutorial with the blue and orange colors.

There's not so much to program in this tutorial, but a lot to learn.

Starting and stopping effects in cues and one of the differences between Relative and Absolute effects

Let's try to make some cues.

Select all your lights and turn then on in a red color (please don't use any of the two color presets we used in effect number 3).

Store this as cue 1 on an executor.

Clear your programmer and run cue 1.

Now we want to use our orange/blue color effect. So press it twice to select the fixtures and apply the effect.

Now two things can happen.

If you actually see the orange/blue colors, then you haven't followed the steps precisely ;-) It's ok, keep reading and we'll go through what happens.

If you followed the steps and are on a 2.6 (or later) version, you are now looking at something that looks like a dimmer sine effect.

With this effect running store a new cue (2) with a fade time of 3 sec. Clear your programmer. You should now be back in cue 1.

The reason that your effect didn't look like the orange/blue effect we originally created is the Mode. We made a 'Relative' effect. This puts the effect values on top if the excisting values from the previous cue. So adding an orange/blue color on top of a red color will give you a red/black look. We need to change the effect. Press Edit followed by the 3rd effect - this opens the Effect Editor.

We need to change the mode for each line from 'Relative' (Rel) to 'Absolute' (Abs). Select all lines by pressing the top line holding and dragging down to the bottom line and then release the screen. You can do this in any column. Now you can press where it says 'Line Relative' in the bottom line until it says 'Line Absolute'. Now each line in the 'Mode' column should say "Abs".

Close the Effect Editor and press Go. Now you should experience an nice fade from the red color to the color effect fading in the effect in 3 seconds.

That's nice - but let's try to make a cue 3 where we return to same look as cue 1.

To stop an effect in a cue, we need to "stomp" the effect.

Press MA and At at the same time. This gives you the "Stomp" keyword in the commandline. Next press the MA and 4 at the same time. Now you fixtures should be white!

Let's just go through what have happened. MA and At gives the the "Stomp" keyword, this is used when you want to stop effects.

Then we presses MA and 4 at the same time. This selects the preset type "Color". So what we have done is taken the effect out of the color preset type.

'Ok, but why is the fixtures white and not red?' - you ask. Well this is because it's an 'Absolute' effect. When you take the stomp value in your programmer from an absolute effect, then it displays the default values (white).

Now store cue 3 with a fade time of 3 seconds. Clear your programmer. You should now look at cue 2 with the effect running.

Press Go.

Now you should see a nice fade from the effect back to the tracked red color from cue.

This is an example of how fixtures can get values from different layers (value layers and effect layers). Let's have a look in the tracking sheet:

The picture above display three different layers, but it's the same sequence and it's the values stored for fixture number 1.

The tracking sheet on the left is the 'Values' layer. Here you can see that the fixture gets a dimmer value and a color (red) in cue 1. These values are tracked through cue 2 and 3.

The tracking sheet on the right is the 'EffectID' layer. Here we can see that the fixtures colors are referencing an effect (number 3 called "Color Effect"). The important part here is that we don't get the values from the effect in our cue, but we are calling the effect (preset) called "Color Effect". If you remember, we stored cue number 2 even though it was an relative effect - we then changed the effect to absolute, but did't change cue number 2 - we didn't need to.

The middle tracking sheet displays the 'Form' layer. You can see that the color attributes uses the 'sin' form in cue 2. There are two things to notice here.

  1. The color of the text is darker then the text in cue 3. This is because the values isn't stored like this - it's a value from the "Color Effect". It just show you what the output form is.
  2. There's an "A" in front of the form number and name. This tells you that this is an absolute value.

In cue 3 we have stored a relative (there's an "R" in front of the Form number and name) stomp form. This returns the color to the tracked (red) color from the value layer. So we are actually stomping the Form effect layer.

It's also worth noticing how the colored bars in the tracking sheet helps you to see where the colors gets their values.

A new sequence with a Relative effect

Let's try to make a new sequence where we use the relative position effect we made in the previous tutorial (Move Effect).

We need three position presets for this tutorial. Create one with all the fixtures in their home position; one where they all point on stage left and one where they alle point stage right.

Create a new sequence with cue 1 that turns on all the fixtures and uses the Stage Left position. Clear your programmer and run cue 1.

Now press the "Move Effect" twice (once to select the fixture, and once more to apply the effect). Store this as cue 2 with a fade time of 3 seconds. Clear your programmer and run the cue.

What you should experience is the effect fading in the size of the circle. all circling around the Stage Left position. So this is a movement (Center/Size values) around the positions from the Value layer (Stage Left).

Now press the Stage Right position twice. Store this as cue 3 with a fade time of 3 seconds. Clear your programmer and run the cue.

What should happen is the fixtures continuing the circle effect but moving the fixture so the circle effect is now circling the Stage Right position.

Now press MA and At followed by the Home preset. Store this as cue 4 with a fade time of 3. Clear your programmer and run the cue.

What hopefully happens is your fixtures fadeing out the circle effect (because we used stomp) and moving to the Home position (because we stomped in the Home preset).

Let's have a look at the tracking sheets:

The same sheet display the same layers as the previous picture above.

Let's talk about what happens in the cues.

Cue 1: In the Value layer we can see that the fixtures get a position from a preset and they are turned to full (called "open").

Cue 2: The dimmer and position preset are tracked. In the EffectID layer we can see that the positions get the effect called "Move Effect". I the Form layer we can see that its a relative (because of the "R" in front of the number and name).

Cue 3: In this cue we can see that the position in the Value layer is changed to a different preset. The effect is tracked, so the circle movement continues.

Cue 4: In this cue you can see that the fixture gets a new position (Home) in Value layer. In the Effect Form layer we can see that the effect is stopped using the Stomp in the Form layer.

Again I suggest keeping an eye on the colored bars in the tracking sheet. They actually tell the whole story :-)

A short note on using speed in effects

Controlling the speed can quickly become very complicated. It's important to know that many factors can have an impact on your effects speed.

If you don't have any intention of changing your effect using a speed master or rate master, you should just use the speed column in the Effect Editor to change the speed.

But if you would like to use the effect with a master you need to know a few things.

The default speed for effects is 60 bpm = 1 hz. All new speed masters also use this as a default.

If you need to use a speed master I suggest you change the speed in the effect to 60bpm. That way your effect will run the speed displayed at the master.

The speed master is a multiplier with a base value of 60 bpm. The best way to know whats going on is to do the following.

Make a Speed master 1 on executor 6.

Edit the Move Effect. Change the speed on both Pan and Tilt to 60 bpm and in the Speed Group column select Speed 1.

Now run cue number 2 in the last sequence we made.

Have a look in the Fixture sheet in the Effect Speed layer. The effect should say 60 bpm.

When you move the speed fader up and down the effect speed will follow this speed.

Reset the speed master to 60 bpm by typing the following in the commandline.

[Channel]>Fader 6 At 26.65

Edit the effect so it says 30 bpm in the speed column.

Notice that the Speed Group Master still says 60 bpm, but in the fixture sheet we can see that the resulting speed output is 30 bpm.

If you now move the Speed Group Master up to 120 bpm (fader 6 at 53.3) the resulting speed is 60 bpm.

If you move the Speed Group Master up and down with the Effect Editor open, you can see that this changes the value in the speed column.

If your effect uses a Speed Group Master then the Executor Speed Master for the sequence don't have any effect on the speed. If you haven't assigned any Speed Group Master then the Executor Speed Master, with the execption that it doesn't change the set speed in the Effect Editor.

Bottom line is this: There's a ton of ways to modify the speed used by effects. They are all tailored to different ways to use the console. There's no right or wrong way. Keep it simple and remember that the Fixture Sheet Effect Speed Layer displays the resulting speed. The Effect Speed Group Layer can help identifying any Speed Group Masters.

What's next

In the next effect tutorial, we are going to edit an effect using the command line.

Topic: Edit an effect using the command line.

The effects can be edited using the command line.

Now we are going to change the speed of the color effect using the command line.

If you haven't done the previous effects tutorials, I'll strongly urge you to do so - since we are going to edit one of the effects.

Setting up for this tutorial.

You need to have a Command Line window so you can see what you are going.

The two main keywords for this tutorial is 'List' and 'CD'.

'List' is used to display show data. 'CD' is "Change Directory" - it's used to navigate the layers or folders of the console.

Please follow the links at the bottom for more details about these commands.

Every input line displayed in the following tutorial is followed by a Please to execute the command.

Let's make some changes.

We need to navigate to the effects. We do that using the 'CD' keyword

[Channel]>CD Effect

This will take us directly to the effect part of the console.

Now we should use the 'List' to see what options we have:

Effects/1 'Global' >list

Now we get a list of your three effects. The number in the parentheses are the number of lines each effect uses:

Effect 1 : 1 Move Effect (2)
Effect 2 : 2 Dim Effect (1)
Effect 3 : 3 Color Effect (3)

Our goal is to change the speed of the color effect. So we need to go into the third effect:

Effects/'Global' 1>cd 3

A new 'list' revials a lot more:

Effects/'Global' 1/'Color Effect' 3>list

What you now see is all the lines in the effect (in each row) and all the elements in the lines (the columns). Those with a green headline (like 'Speed') can be changed using commands like assign 1 /dir=. Those with a yellow color are references to other elements. They can be changed using commands like assign form "Cos" at 1. The red color indicates elements that cannot be changed.

Now let's change the 'Speed' in the first line:

Effects/'Global' 1/'Color Effect' 3>assign 1 /speed=30

You can do another 'list' to check that it changed the rate. Now do the two other lines:

Effects/'Global' 1/'Color Effect' 3>assign 2+3 /speed=30

That's it. Now all three line have a speed of 30 BPM.

Return to the "root" of the console by typing "cd /" in the command line.

What's next?

In the next tutorial we are going to have a look at using macros to edit our effects.

Topic: Change an effect using a Macro.

We are going to make a macro that asks what speed we want, and then applies it to our color effect.

It's important that you have followed all the previous steps in the previous effect tutorials. If you haven't done that, then I strongly urge you to do so.

We are going to use some command elements that's outside the scope of this tutorial. If you want to learn more about making macros, please complete the Macro tutorial.

Making the Rate macro.

We almost have all the windows we need. The one thing you should add is the macro pool.

Press Edit and then the first Macro pool button.

Press Add (the X1 key). We are going to create a variable called "newSpeed". This variable will hold the new speed time. The first thing our macro should do is to ask us what speed we want, and store it in the variable.

In the 'Text' cell of the macro write this:

SetVar $newSpeed = (What speed do you want?)

Add a new line to you macro. We are now going to navigate to the effect. We leant how to do this in the previous tutorial page. In the macro line type this:

cd Effect 3

That takes us directly to the color effect (effect number 3). Now we can use the variable to assign the new speed to the lines.

Add a new line in the macro and write this:

ass 1 t 3 /speed=$newSpeed

Now all we need is to return to the root. Add line to the macro, and type this:

cd /

Press the 'Label' button and label it "New Speed for Colors".

The macro is done. It should look like this:

Close the editor - again this is a good idea when you are done editing.

And we are done. Make your color effect run and then test your new macro.

What's next?

There's only one page left. Here we are going to take a look at different ways the effects can be run and controlled.

Topic: Different ways to use effects.

Effect can be used and controlled in many ways. This will explorer some of the most common.

In this last effect tutorial we will look at some of the ways to use effects. Not really a tutorial, but more a short explanation.

The Effect Pool

First we need to take a look at how the Effects Pool window work.

The pool have three different modes, that can all be changed using the pool options (press the yellow bale above where it says "Effect"):

Normal Call (color defined by the options):
If your programmer is empty and you press the Pool Button once, you'll select alle the fixtures that can use the effect. The second press will run the effect in your programmer.
Fast Call (buttons will have a dark red color):
Again beginning with an empty programmer. One press on a pool button will immediately run the effect for all possible fixtures. Still running in the programmer.
Pool Playback (the buttons will have purple colors) :
Now you can press the pool buttons and the effect will run in the pool as if it was running on an executor. You can't do this with "Template" effects.

Let's have a look at other ways to run effects.

In the programmer.

You can run effects directly in your programmer. This can be useful in one-offs or any situation where you can improvise and there's room to play.

You can build the effect directly or you can use the effect pool (in 'Normal Call' or 'Fast Call') to take the effects into your programmer.

Directly build in cue.

When we previously made an effect in the programmer, we stored it in an effect pool button - but we could have stored it directly in a cue (or updated an active cue).

Values will then fade using the fade times in the cue. You can also change any effect values from cue to cue.

Effect presets in cues.

Selected effects you have stored in the effect pool, work as effect "presets". You can call these effects and store them in cues. If you then change the effect your changes will be used in the cue.

On executors.

You can assign an effect to an executor. Simply by pressing Assign Effect 1 and then an executor button.

There are three special options for effects on executors: 'Off On Overwritten', 'Speed (factor)', 'Speed (master)' and (for sequences) 'Link Effect To Rate'.

You may change these options by opening the Assign-menu for the Executor, press Assign, then the Exec-button, and select Options on the right hand side.

'Off On Overwritten' turns the effect off if it's completely overwritten by new values.

'Speed (factor)' is used to multiply or divide the overall speed of the entire effect.

'Speed (master)' is 'individual' as a standard. This means that the speed stored in the effect is the ones used (plus the speed factor). You can use this button to assign the effect executor to an speed group master (there are 15 possible speed group masters). Try pressing here and select 'Speed 1'. Then assign a speed group master to an executor. Then run your effect and turn the speed master up and down.

'Link Effect To Rate' adds another element to your speed. You can add the rate master. This is like an extra speed factor, that you can use to change the speed of the effect. The more of these elements you use the more complicated it gets to set an actual speed - so keep it simple.

Running effects in the effects pool.

When you press Go+ followed by a pool button, you'll run the effect directly in the pool (only selected effects). You can also achieve this when your pool is in 'Pool Backback' mode. Then you just need to press the pool buttons.

To change the options in the 'Pool Playback'. Press the Assign followed by the pool button (only when in 'Pool Playback'). This gives you the assign menu and you can change the options described above.

Effects running on executors or in the pool have a higher priority than effects in from the sequences.

Finishing words

You can view all the running effect by pressing and holding the Effects key (or create a 'Running Effects' window). This allows you to get an overview of all the running effects. And turn them off.

The effect engine in the grandMA2 has introduced some big changes. The possibility to use presets directly in the effect is a major advantage. Coming from the grandMA series 1, you will notice that the modulators has disappeared. But the new changes to the effect generator allows you to make the same effects in a more streamlined method. But hopefully you'll have some idea of how they work after finishing these tutorials.

Topic: Tutorial Sequences

In this section you will learn how to work with sequences

Topic: Working with MIB

how to use MIB to mark/preposition attributes.

Introduction

MoveInBlack is a function which in a tracking sequence will look ahead and preposition attributes of fixtures that are fading in from zero, to automatically prevent "ugly" transitions where you would normally see the fixture move the attributes into position, while the fixture is fading in.

MIB is enabled on a cue-per-cue basis (actually per cue-part), by giving the MIB-property of the cue-part a value which tells the console when it should do the prepositioning.

  • a zero or positive MIB-value indicates an specific cue number from where MIB is allowed
  • a negative MIB-value indicates a relative cue number from where MIB is allowed

Example:

If Cue 91 is given a MIB-value of "80", the console will as soon as possible from Cue 80 and forward try to preposition fixtures for Cue 91.

If Cue 91 is given a MIB-value of "-5", the console will as soon as possible from Cue 86 and forward try to preposition fixtures for Cue 91. (91 minus 5 equals 86 -> Cue 86)

The actual prepositioning of each attribute will not necessarily take place in the cue indicated by the MIB-value. "as soon as possible" means that for each attribute, the prepositioning will be put "on hold" if any of the scenarios below is present.

  • dimmer-output is above zero
  • dimmer has a value above zero in any of the cues between the current cue and the cue to prepare for
  • the attribute is included in any of the cues between the current cue and the cue to prepare for

Valid MIB-values

Early / E
same as numeric value "0", preposition as early as possible
[x.xxx]
preposition from Cue number x.xxx
-[x.xxx]
preposition x.xxx Cue-numbers before
Late / L
same as numeric value "-1", preposition 1.000 Cue-numbers before
Off / O
same as no value, do not preposition

Sequence Executor Sheet

In the Sequence Executor Sheet you will find the MIB-column, where you may edit the MIB-value via normal right-click/encoder-click and enter the value.

An asterisk "*" indicates that a Cue is capable of MIB, but no MIB-value is given, while a MIB-value in red indicates that a MIB-value is given, but the cue is not capable to MIB.

- "MIB-capability" here defined as a cue with one or more fixtures with dimmer-value above zero, and previous state of dimmer-value not above zero (=fixture is fading up) - and one or more other additional attributes (= something to preposition)

Setting MIB via Commandline

MIB is a property of Cue Parts, and its value may be assigned with standard syntax:

[Channel]>Assign Cue / MIB=late
Assign MIB-value "Late" to current Cue and all its parts
[Channel]>Assign Cue 101 Part 3 / MIB=99
Assign Cue 99 as MIB-value for part 3 of Cue 101
[Channel]>Assign Cue 1 Thru 10 / MIB=Off
Removes MIB from Cue 1 thru 10

A useful MIB-macro could go something like this:

Assign Cue /mib=off

SetVar $mibvalue=("Please enter MIB")

AssignCue /mib=$mibvalue

Pressing the Macro and Please, will disable MIB for the current cue, while presing the Macro, then a number followed by Please, will set the MIB-value for current cue.

MIB timing

MIB uses two general time settings MIB-Delay and MIB-Fade

MIB Delay is the time to wait from a fixture have faded out until it starts to MIB, while MIB fade is the actual time used to prepositioning.

Increasing MIB Delay may be useful for fixtures with slow dimmer or afterglow. Increasing MIB Fade may be useful for noisy fixtures, or if the movement of the fixturebody is visually disturbing for the audience

In addition to the general MIB-timing found under Setup>Show>Playbacktiming, it is also possible via the fixturetype Editor to set individual MIB delay per Fixturetype, and individual MIB fade per attribute per Fixturetype.

MIB feedback

When MIB Delay is active, or MIB is "put on hold" the Executor Key backlight will blink fast.

When MIB Fade is active (fixtures are moving to preposition), the Executor key backlighting will blink slowly

Attributes which have MIB'ed will be displayed in the ExecutorID and SequenceID layer of the Fixture Sheet with a slightly paler shade of the usual backgroundcolor (green for selected Executor, yellow for others), to indicate that the source of the value is from a future cue.

Pitfalls

When using MIB, the desk is not only tracking values from earlier cues, it is also tracking forward and outputting values from future, non-executed cues. This is sort-of "Back to the Future", with dilemmas you find in time-travel-theory.

e.g

  • fixture one is on, and red in cue 1
  • turns off in cue 2
  • and comes on in blue in cue 10

As we don't want to see the scroll to blue in cue 10, we mark this cue as MIB early.

  • everything is fine, fixture one preposition after faded out in cue 2

now let's say we're in cue 5 and want to make some changes...

  • On with fixture one, - it's blue - looks good
  • update cue only

Next time we play back the sequence, cue 5 does not look the same ?

- last time we played back the sequence, fixture one was blue because it had prepositioned to cue 10, however as it is now used in cue 5 it cannot preposition until after cue 6, - and will stay red.

These issues may be minimized by not prepositioning too early, and by activating MIB Never in the Executor Assign-menu if you are to make major changes to your cues.

Topic: Working with tracking sequences and Cue-modes

How to assert values and prevent tracking in tracking sequence

Introduction

In a tracking sequence, the content of a cue represent the changes happening in that cue. Any unchanged values will track from earlier cues, and the state - the actual look - of the cue is a combination of what has happened earlier and what is happening in the cue. This tracking philosophy works similar to how the staging, set-design and any props may be handled.

Cue 1: Place sofa on stage left.

Cue 2: Actor1 enters from rear.

Cue 3: Actor2 enters from left and gets seated

Cue 4: Actor1 exits stage right

Even though Cue 3 only tells us that Actor2 will be in the sofa, when we are in Cue 3, we also have the sofa and Actor1 on stage. Unless we take out the sofa, it will stay on stage....

In some scenarios, you may want this tracking behaviour to stop. When starting the second act, you don't want any additional props added to first act to stay on the stage, just because you didn't tell the stage-crew to carry these out when you originally created the look of the first cue of second act. - You want this tracking behaviour to Break.

The Break mode of a cue will make sure that any later addition or changes in earlier cues is reverted back to its original state in the break-cue, similar to how a Cue-Only store would work for the next cue.

A Break is indicated in both Sequence Executor and Sequence Tracking sheet with a white line above the cue

By default when calling a cue with a normal "Go", only the content of the cue is called, not the tracking state. If you are only using one executor/playback this behaviour is irrelevant, however if you have other executors that have overwritten your state, you might in some scenarios want that calling the cue also calls the tracking state. this may be achieved with then cue-mode Assert. Assert will call the state of your sequence, by using the original timing, and not affect any ongoing fades, (e.g. a 30 minutes sunset still on it's way out).

In other scenarios you might want to re-establish state, and assert the sequence, but terminate any ongoing fades. The cue-mode X-Assert will crossfade to the current state - with the timing of the current cue. This may be used i.e. if you want to make sure that your zero second Blackout Cue is cutting to black, even if you have to run the cue earlier than usual and the sunset has not yet finished.

Possible cue-mode combinations

Normal
normal tracking mode
Assert
State is asserted with original timing
X-Assert
State is asserted with cuetiming of current cue
Break
Prevents tracking and performs an Assert
X-Break
Prevents tracking and performs an X-Assert

Commandline

The mode property of a cue may be accessed with normal syntax for changing object-properties:

Assign [cue] /mode=[mode]

Example:

AssignCue 3/mode=x-break

Topic: Layout Tutorial

Before you do this tutorial, you should have some basic knowledge about the console. If you don't feel you have this; you should do the Basic tutorials first.

In this tutorial, we are going to make a Layout view that uses a background picture of a theater. The goal is to make it look like this:

You will need a picture for the background. Here is a link. Right click on this and open it on a new tab. Right click the image on the page and save it on a USB stick - somewhere you can find it again.

This tutorial are made for version 2.9 and you'll only get the wanted result if you use version 2.9 or newer.

Topic: The Setup

We need a new empty show. I suggest you check all the boxes in the New Show pop-up. In addition, you might call the show something like “Layout Tutorial”.

Let´s begin by patching 30 x generic dimmers, 4 x pulsar ChromaBattern 200 (3 channel mode) and 12 x Martin Viper Profile.

Now let’s make some views. For this tutorial, we need a big Layout View and a small Layout Pool. You can arrange this as you like.

In a different view, we need an Image pool.

This is what my empty layout view looks like:

Topic: Storing the dimmers into a Layout

I suggest we begin with arranging the generic dimmers in your view.

Select the 30 dimmers. Then press Store followed by the first square in the Layout Pool. Then press the pool square again to select that layout.

This should display the 30 dimmers lined up in the Layout view with a grid underneath. Something like this:

Topic: Adding a background image

The first step to adding the background picture is to import the one we put on the stick.

Open your view with the Image pool. Press Edit and then (or right click with your mouse) on the first empty Image Pool button.

This should open the Image Viewer pop-up. Here you can press the Load Image button on the right side (or press the U2 key). This will give you the Open File pop-up (I know there's a lot of pop-ups). On the right side of this you can select your USB stick in the “Select Drive” drop-down (yes, there's both pop-ups and drop-downs). Select your USB Stick - find, and select the image you downloaded. When you click it or press Open then you are back in the Image Viewer. Here I suggest you press the Label button and name the Image “Theater” (if that isn't already the name). Finish by pressing the close button in the upper right corner.

Now we need to assign the new image in our layout.

What we are going to do is to draw a square and assign the Image to this square.

So let's begin by making by pressing the Setup button in the title bar of the layout view.

This should change the Encoder Toolbar to something like this:

Press the square in the toolbar and draw a square on the screen. The size isn't important right now.

Make sure you change from the square to “Select” in the toolbar. Now select the new square (the one you just draw) and right click it (or press it to select it and then press the screen encoder).

This opens an Editor like this:

In the lower left corner there's a box called Image/Icon where it says “None”. Press this. Now you'll see the Select an image pop-up. There's two taps at the top of this pop-up. Select the one called “Image”. This is all the Images in the Image pool. Select the one we imported.

Before we continue you should notice that there's a button called Load image. With this button we could have skipped the part about the Image pool (but then you wouldn't know it). When you are done thinking about all the unnecessary steps I'm going to take you through, we can continue by pressing the Please button in the “Select an image” pop-up.

Ok, back at the “Edit Layout Element” pop-up. We have now assigned the Image to the square. But we need to rotate it. Set the “Image/Icon Rotation” to 270 degrees. We should also turn off the “Group Select”. This will put the image as a background image that doesn't select all the elements inside the square and puts the image top of the elements, making it impossible to select the fixtures. We are done in the editor and can confirm our choices by pressing the Please button inside it.

But we are not really done with the new background image. Please make sure it's selected. And use the Encoder Toolbar to change the “Move X” to 0.00, the “Move Y” to 15.00, “Size X” to 64.50, “Size Y” to 137.80 and we should also change the border color to “0 0 0” (black).

This will change the image to a scale and size that makes sense.

Now my layout looks like this:

f

Topic: Setting up the Fixtures

Now we are going to have a look at one of the fixtures.

Select fixture number 1 and make sure you have activated Setup in the Layout View.

We are going to use the encoder bar again to get all the basics in order. For this example, I'm going to use these settings:

Move X
-18.25
Move Y
20.50
Size X
3.2
Size Y
3.2
Font Size
Small
Border Color
120 120 120
Image/Icon
Leko (Found in the image pool)

However, there are some things we need to change using the element editor. With the fixture selected press the screen encoder (or right click it with your mouse).

Here we need to change the settings so it looks like this:

This is all the knowledge you need to move your fixtures and make them look the way you like.

Please arrange the rest to something like this:

To make it more useful I'm going to add a gel in the fixtures. The easiest way to do this for many fixtures is in the console Setup. Navigate to the “Patch only (Live)” in the setup.

In the layer where you have the dimmers you'll need to scroll the right until you see the Color column.

I have selected all my odd numbered fixtures from 1 to 19 (using the ctrl + mouse click), then I right clicked and in the Color Editor I selected the “Swatch Book” in the title bar. Then I selected the Lee manufacturer and then the color number 161.

Then I selected all the even numbered fixtures and gave them color Lee 162.

You can exit the setup when you have done this.

Now try to turn on your lights. You'll see the intensity and color fill the inside of the images. This is because they are transparent inside the symbol.

Topic: The LEDs

When you need to add fixtures to your layout, then you need to store them into a layout pool button.

Clear your programmer and select the four LED bars.

Now press Store and press the existing Layout Pool Button. You'll now be asked if you want to Overwrite, Merge or Remove the new fixtures. You should merge.

I would prefer to keep these fixtures simple, just change the size and move them into position.

This is my result:

Topic: The Movers

Now we should add the Vipers. You should know how to merge new fixtures to your layout. If not then have a look at how we added the LEDs.

Now, we could use the existing images of moving lights that's in the image pool. However, I prefer to see more information, and use other methods for showing me that they are moving lights.

I make the border of the symbol a different color to indicate the fixture type. When the moving light is a profile I would like to see what gobo is in there and then it's better to have the “Visualization” as a Spot instead of Filled and not to use an image.

This is my setup in the Element Editor:

And this is my result:

Topic: Adding pool elements

Now we are going to have a look at adding some pool elements to our layout. More specific; we are going to add some groups.

First thing you need to do is to make some groups. Please make some that makes sense to you.

It's an advantage if you can fit the group pool on a different screen than your Layouts, but still have both visible.

When you want to add fixtures, you need to store them into your layout. However, when you want to add a pool element like groups or presets you need to assign them into your layout.

Let's do this. Press the Assign key and then press one of the groups in the group pool. Then press in your layout where you want to add the group.

Repeat this for all your groups. You might want to adjust the size of the group elements. As a default the pool elements are added with the same look as when it's in the pool. So we get the same look and feel as when it's in the pool.

This is my result (or just a section of the layout):

Topic: Final changes

As a last little thing I want to change is the removal of the visible grid.

Please press the yellow button in the upper left corner of the Layout view. This gives us the Layout options.

Here you can select the “Layout data” tab and change the “Grid X” to 0. This effectively removes the visible grid, for a nicer look.

This is the result:

Topic: Bitmap Effect Tutorial

This is a collection of Bitmap Effects tutorials.

The first (Setup Show) is a generic tutorial, setting up the basics show for all the other Bitmap Tutorials.

Topic: Bitmap Effect Tutorial - Setup Show

In this part we are going to set up the show with a big LED wall.

The first thing you need to do is to create a new show.

I made one called "BitmapEffectTutorial" and made sure all the boxes are checked.

Then you need to go to Setup Show Patch & Fixture Schedule .

Here you need to patch 300 "generic@led+virtual_dimmer@.xml". Give them channel and fixture ID "1". Patch them where you like.

Create a 'Stage Window'. Select all the LED fixtures and press the "Setup" button in the 'Stage Window'.

We need to rotate the LED's so they face the audience.

Press the 'Location 1 of 2' button until it changes to 'Rotation 2 of 2'. Now we can rotate the LED's.

Set the 'X' value to "-90". That rotates the LED's. Now would be a good time to turn the LED's dimmer value at full. Then there should be a white square facing the camera.

Next we are going to set them up in a matrix.

Begin by moving all the fixtures. Press the 'Rotation 2 of 2' button so it changes to 'Location 1 of 2'.

Then set your 'X' value to "-7", 'Y' value to "3" and the 'Z' value to "4.5".

Press the 'Wizard' button and in the Wizard pop-up select the 'Matrix2D' tab.

Make sure you set the options like this:

Every setting here is important. Make sure you have the exact setting as above.

Then press the 'Apply & Close' button.

This is actually all we need to setup the show.

Your stage view should look like this:

Turn of the 'Setup' button in the stage view, clear your programmer and move on to the next page.

Topic: Bitmap Effect Tutorial - Create a rainbow scrolling Bitmap Effect

Creating a scrolling bitmap effect.

We are going to create a color bitmap effect. This means that the effect is affecting the color attributes of the fixtures.

This also means that it doesn't affect the dimmer attribute. So we need to make some preparations.

Creating a sequence with dimmer value.

First we need to turn on the dimmer so we can see the color values change (when the bitmap effect is running).

Select all your LED's and turn them at full. 1 thru At At.

Store this in a new sequence on executor fader 1. Store Exec 1 Please.

Now make sure the fader is at 100 and the sequence is on.

Creating the Bitmap Effect.

Without clearing the programmer we need to create the basis of the bitmap effect. Press Store Effect Effect 1 Please. Pressing the 'Effect' key twice gives you the 'Bitmap' keyword.

When you create(store) a Bitmap Effect it's important to have a selection with the fixtures you want affected by the bitmap effect. This stores the fixtures in the Bitmap Effect.

To run the Bitmap Effect you need to assign it to an Executor: Assign Effect Effect 1 Exec 2 Please.

This also gives you access to the best Bitmap Effect Editor.

The Bitmap Effect Editor.

Now we are going to edit the Bitmap Effect so it looks like we want it. But first it might be a good idea to activate the Bitmap Effect so we immediately can see the changes we do. Make sure the fader is at full an press the "Go" executor button.

Nothing happens because the Bitmap Effect is almost empty.

We need the Bitmap Effect Editor. Press Edit Exec 2 Please. This gives us the editor on screen 1.

The Basics options.

The first thing we can edit here is the name of the Bitmap Effect. Press the green area next to 'Name'. Now enter: Rainbow Scroll.

Then we need a picture source. Press the empty green area next to 'File'. This opens the Browser pop-up. Press the 'Folder Up' icon and navigate through gobos carallon gobos apollo and select the file called "059900CS-0168".

The 'Mode' should be "Color". 'ScaleMode' doesn't matter in this tutorial since we are going to set the Size to the original picture.

The 'Size X' and 'Size Y' should both be "128". It doesn't matter for this tutorial if the 'Tile' is on or off.

In the small stage window on the right side you should zoom out and move the view so you just can see all the LED's. It should look like this:

Making it move.

Right now the bitmap effect is boring. It just displays a picture. Our goal here is to make something that works like an animation wheel in an normal fixture. Let's begin by making it rotate.

Press the 'Tools' tab followed by the 'Toggle Function' button and then the 'Rotate Right' button. Now we have a rotating effect. But we would like it to scroll, so we need to tweak the scale and offset the image.

Press the 'Modulator Fader' tab.

Here we can change a lot of values. Let's begin with the 'Scale'. This is the second set of faders in the top row. We want the scale to be smaller on both X and Y. This is easily achieved by pressing the second 'Single' button on the bottom until it says 'Both'. This will make both the X and Y value change together.

Move the 'Scale X' fader until it has a value close to "5". You might need to release the fader and move it again to reach "5".

Now we need to decide what direction we want it to move. It's all done by offsetting the rotating picture.

If you want it to scroll from left to right your need to set the 'Offset Y' to something like "1.75".

If you want it to scroll from right to left your need to set the 'Offset Y' to something like "-1.75".

If you want it to scroll from top to bottom your need to set the 'Offset X' to something like "-1.4".

If you want it to scroll from bottom to top your need to set the 'Offset X' to something like "1.4".

You can also combine any of the two making it in an angle.

It's all up to you. The result should look something like this:

This was the Rainbow Scroll Bitmap Effect tutorial.

Topic: Bitmap Effect Tutorial - Create a Rotating Bitmap Effect

Creating a rotating spiral bitmap effect.

We are going to create another color bitmap effect. If you haven't made the Rainbow Scrolling Bitmap Effect, I suggest you go back one page and make it.

Creating a sequence with dimmer value.

If you have done this already, just skip this step.

If this is the first Bitmap Effect tutorial you make, you need to turn on the dimmer so you can see the color values change (when the Bitmap Effect is running).

Select all your LED's and turn them at full. 1 thru At At.

Store this in a new sequence on executor fader 1. Store Exec 1 Please.

Now make sure the fader is at 100 and the sequence is on.

Creating the Bitmap Effect.

Make sure you have all the LED's selected. Press Store Effect Effect 2 Please. Pressing the 'Effect' key twice gives you the 'Bitmap' keyword.

When you create(store) a Bitmap Effect it's important to have a selection with the fixtures you want affected by the bitmap effect. This stores the fixtures in the Bitmap Effect.

To run the Bitmap Effect you need to assign it to an Executor: Assign Effect Effect 2 Exec 3 Please.

This also gives you access to the best Bitmap Effect Editor.

The Bitmap Effect Editor.

Now we are going to edit the Bitmap Effect so it looks like we want it. But first it might be a good idea to activate the Bitmap Effect so we immediately can see the changes we do. Make sure the fader is at full an press the "Go" executor button.

Nothing happens because the Bitmap Effect is almost empty.

We need the Bitmap Effect Editor. Press Edit Exec 2 Please. This gives us the editor on screen 1.

The Basics options.

The first thing we can edit here is the name of the Bitmap Effect. Press the green area next to 'Name'. Now enter: Rotating Spiral.

Then we need a picture source. Press the empty green area next to 'File'. This opens the Browser pop-up. Press the 'Folder Up' icon and navigate through gobos carallon gobos apollo and select the file called "059900CS-0163".

The 'Mode' should be "Color". 'ScaleMode' doesn't matter in this tutorial since we are going to set the Size to the original picture.

The 'Size X' and 'Size Y' should both be "128". It doesn't matter for this tutorial if the 'Tile' is on or off.

In the small stage window on the right side you should zoom out and move the view so you just can see all the LED's. It should look like this:

Making it move.

Right now the bitmap effect is boring. It just displays a picture. Our goal here is to make a rotating picture that full the entire LED "screen". Let's begin by making it rotate.

Press the 'Tools' tab followed by the 'Toggle Function' button and then the 'Rotate Left' button. Now we have a rotating effect. And all we need is to scale it.

Press the 'Modulator Fader' tab.

Here we can change a lot of values. We are just going to use the 'Scale'. This is the second set of faders in the top row.

We want the picture to fill all the LED's, so the picture needs to be bigger.

This is easily achieved by pressing the second 'Single' button on the bottom until it says 'Both'. This will make both the X and Y value change together.

Move the 'Scale X' fader until it has a value of "1.5". You might need to release the fader and move it again to reach "1.5".

The result should look something like this:

This was the Rotating Spiral Bitmap Effect tutorial.

Topic: MAtricks Tutorial - Intro

MAtricks is a collection of tools working on your current Selection. The most basic tricks are Next and Previous, which will step through your current selection one by one, in the order they were selected.

Channel1Thru12Please

Highlight

Next

Next

Next

Prev

You may temporary enable/disable the matrick with the Set key:

Set

Set

or reselect your original selection with the All keyword, accessible via hardkeys by pressing simultaneously Prev and Next

Prev&Next

Next

Topic: MAtricks Tutorial - Interleave

With a basic selection, all fixtures are in one row, based on the selection-order

With the function MatricksInterleave, the selection is wrapped onto a new row for every n'th fixture, creating a virtual array

[Channel]> MatricksInterleave 4

Next

Next

Prev&Next (reselect All columns)

With the use of the MA modifier key you may step through the array row by row rather than column by column

MA&Next

MA&Next

And reselect all rows with:

MA&Prev&Next (reselect All rows)

These tricks may also be combined:

NextNextNext (third column) MA&NextMA&Next (second row)

The Interleave value (array-width) may be modified with the Set key in conjunction with Next and Prev to increase, decrease or reset interleave:

Set&Next (MatricksInterleave +, increase array-width)

Set&Prev&Next (MatricksInterleave Off)

Topic: MAtricks Tutorial - Blocks

Stepping through a Selection with Next will normally give you single fixtures ( or columns of fixtures, if interleave is active):

Next

With the function MatricksBlocks, x adjecent fixtures/columns are treated as one block:

[Channel]>MatricksBlocks 3

Next

Next

You may adjust the block-size with MA&Set in conjunction with Prev or Next

MA&Set&Prev (MatricksBlocks -, decrease block-size)

The block-width may be reset to one/none by pressing both Prev & Next together with MA & Set

MA&Set&Prev&Next (MatricksBlocks Off, reset block-size)

With an Interleaved array the Blcok-size may be adjusted both in the x and y axis:

[Channel]>MatricksBlocks 3.2

Topic: MAtricks Tutorial - Wings

Stepping through a Selection with Next will normally give you single fixtures:

Next

With the function MatricksWings, the selection is splitted in x parts, and each part is mirroring the previous part:

[Channel]>MatricksWings 2

|

Next

|

[Channel]>MatricksWings 3

| |

Topic: MAtricks Tutorial - Groups

With MatricksGroups the distribution of aligned values may be limited to x fixtures, for then to be repeated:

[Channel]>At 0 Thru 100

[Channel]>MatricksGroups 4
[Channel]>At 0 Thru 100

If you are aligning without grouping on an an array created with MatricksInterleave

[Channel]> At 0 Thru 100

the values are distributed from upper-left to bottom right.

With an interleave array active, the grouping may be given with dot-separated digits to give different values for the x and y axis

[Channel]>MatricksGroups 4.1
[Channel]>At 0 Thru 100

[Channel]>MatricksGroups 1.3
[Channel]>At 0 Thru 100

Topic: DMX merge tutorial.

This tutorial shows you how to merge incoming DMX into your show.

Topic:

Why is this an interesting tutorial?

Well, there are two scenarios that are relevant for DMX input.

At the moment you can't load a grandMA 1 show (or a show from any other manufacturer) into a grandMA 2 console, but if you have two identical patches you can run cues at the "source" console and record them on your grandMA2. You can transfer several DMX universes at the same time.

The other scenario is when you need an input to merge with an existing signal from your grandMA2. This can for several reasons be a more or less permanent situation.

You should know how to do basic setup and programming. If you don't, you should complete the Basic Tutorials before this one (follow the link below).

To complete this tutorial you need a console or an onPC with some grandMA hardware. You'll also need a DMX source.

This page takes you through the steps for setting up a useful show.

The next pages look at DMX recording and merging DMX into a console and a grandMA 2Port Node.

Task: Create a new show.

We need a new empty show with a useful patch.
Steps
  1. Go to the command line and write:
    [Channel]>Loadshow dmx_merge_tutorial /full
    This loads a new completely empty show.
  2. Goto the Setup Show Patch & Fixture Schedule and create 512 single generic dimmer channels patch in the first universe.
  3. Create the views you need. I suggest a Channel Sheet and a Command Line Feedback window.
  4. Save your show.
Result
This is what we need for the patch.

Topic:

Now you can go on to the next pages.

Topic: DMX In Recording on a grandMA2.

This is useful when you need to transfere a show from a different console to your grandMA2.

Please go through the "DMX Input tutorial" for setting up for this tutorial.

Task: Setting up Remote DMX.

We need to set up the Remote DMX. This will take the incoming DMX directly to your programmer, allowing you to store it where you want.
Steps
  1. Go to the command line and write:
    [Channel]>cd Remote 3
    This takes you directly to the DMX remote type.
  2. Write:
    RemoteTypes/DMXRemotes 3>Store 1 t 512
    This creates 512 remote input "containers".
  3. Write:
    RemoteTypes/DMXRemotes 3>Ass 1 t 512 /type=Programmer
    This changes the remote type to "Programmer" sending all the incoming data directly to your programmer.
  4. Write:
    RemoteTypes/DMXRemotes 3>cd/
    This takes you back out of the Remote Input setup.
  5. Go to Setup Show Remote Input Setup DMXRemotes and select all the rows in the DMX column.
  6. Press the Edit hardkey and then inside the blue frame (you can also right-click if you have a mouse).
    This opens the calculator pop-up.
  7. In the pop-up you write "1.1" and press Please.
    This gives you a one-to-one patch of the 512 DMX inputs.
  8. Make sure the DMX Remote is enabled. The background and text of the "Enabled" button is yellow.
  9. Exit the setup.
Result
This is what we need to get the incoming DMX universe to the programmer.

Task: Turn off DMX Merge.

These steps take you through the task of turning off the DMX In Merge.
Context
When you want to record the incoming DMX to a cue, preset, etc., it might be a good idea to turn off DMX merge as it could interfere with your output.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Show Patch Only (Live) DMX List .
  2. Press the Edit hardkey followed by the "On" in the 'DMX In Merge' column and the row for the universe you want to turn off.
  3. Exit the Setup.
Result
You have now turned of the DMX In merge.

Topic:

OK, now it's time to plug in the DMX source, and make sure the grandMA2 is correctly set up for the signal.

Task: Setting up the DMX In port on a Console.

Now we need to configure the port for the DMX signal.
Context
If you use a node please skip this task, and go to the next one.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Network MA Network Configuration Consoles .
  2. You can set up any of the seven port as an Input. But for this tutorial we are going to use the female DMX In connector. Press Edit followed by the cell in the "XLR In" column in the row representing your console.
    This gives you the Cofigure DMX Port pop-up.
  3. In the pop-up you select the Port Mode to "In" using the drop down box.
  4. Set the universe to "1" using the "-" and "+" buttons, and press the Please button.
  5. Exit the Setup.
Result
Now we can move on to the actual business.

Task: Setting up the DMX In port on a grandMA 2Port Node.

Now we need to configure the grandMA 2Port node for the incoming DMX signal.
Context
If you use a grandMA2 Console or grandMA2 NPU please look at the previous task, and ignore this one.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Network MA Network Configuration 2Port .
  2. You can set up any of the ports as an Input. Press Editfollowed by one of the XLR cells in the row representing your 2Port Node.
    This gives you the Cofigure DMX Port pop-up.
  3. In the pop-up you select the Port Mode to "In" using the drop down box.
  4. Set the universe to "1" using the "-" and "+" buttons. You can completely ignore the "Merge Mode", finish by pressing the Please button.
  5. Exit the Setup.
Result
Now we can move on to the actual business.

Topic:

When you send any DMX values to the console, you can see the values go to your programmer, and you can store as you would normally do.

Be aware that when a value has been changed by an external DMX source and this source disappears the value in the programmer goes to the default value!

When you have stored what you need you should turn of the remote DMX to avoid any unwanted output or values in your programmer. There are predefined macros that turn "On" or "Off" the remote DMX, or you can go to the Setup and turn it of.

Topic: DMX Merge

In this tutorial we are going to take a look at merging incoming DMX with the grandMA2.

Topic:

You might have a system where you want to merge an incoming DMX signal into your grandMA. This can be a more permanent or a temporary situation.

Please make the DMX Input tutorial to prepare for this one.

Task: Turning off DMX Remote

If you have DMX Remote that is set up to go to your programmer you might want to turn that off.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Show Remote Input Setup DMX Remotes
  2. Delete the rows with DMX going to the programmer (this allows you to keep other DMX Remote) or just disable the remote function.
  3. Exit the setup.
Result
All right you are now ready to move on.

Task: Turn on merging for universe 1.

Context
As a default Merging is turned on for all universes, but we are going to use the setup menu to make sure it's turned on.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Show Patch only (live) DMX List
  2. There is a column called "DMX In Merge". If there's a "on" in the row for (universe) no. 1, the grandMA2 will merge incoming DMX. If it's empty, you need to press Edit followed by the empty cell.
    The incoming DMX will now merge.
  3. Exit the Setup.

Topic:

OK, now it's time to plug in the DMX source, and make sure the grandMA2 is correctly set up for the signal.

Task: Setting up the DMX In port on a Console.

Now we need to configure the port for the DMX signal.
Context
If you use a node please skip this task, and go to the next one.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Network MA Network Configuration Consoles .
  2. You can set up any of the seven port as an Input. But for this tutorial we are going to use the female DMX In connector. Press Edit followed by the cell in the "XLR In" column in the row representing your console.
    This gives you the Cofigure DMX Port pop-up.
  3. In the pop-up you select the Port Mode to "In" using the drop down box.
  4. Set the universe to "1" using the "-" and "+" buttons, and press the Please button.
  5. Exit the Setup.
Result
Now we can move on to the actual business. If you are not using a node please skip the next task.

Task: Setting up the DMX In port on a grandMA 2Port Node.

Now we need to configure the grandMA 2Port node for the incoming DMX signal.
Context
If you use a grandMA2 Console or grandMA2 NPU please look at the previous task, and ignore this one.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Network MA Network Configuration 2Port .
  2. You can set up any of the ports as an Input. Press Editfollowed by one of the XLR cells in the row representing your 2Port Node.
    This gives you the Cofigure DMX Port pop-up.
  3. In the pop-up you select the Port Mode to "In" using the drop down box.
  4. Set the universe to "1" using the "-" and "+" buttons. You can completely ignore the "Merge Mode", finish by pressing the Please button.
  5. Exit the Setup.
Result
Now we can move on to the actual merging business.

Topic:

When you send any DMX values to the console, it will merge with the DMX generated by the console. The merge will always be a HTP merge - there's currently no way to change this.

You can only see the incoming signal in a DMX Sheet window.

Topic: grandMA NPU tutorial

In this tutorial we will have a lock at some of the common actions on a grandMA NPU.

In this grandMA NPU tutorial we are going to pretend that we just got a NPU with the delivery, and need to have it connected with a grandMA2 console (or onPC 2) for the first time.

One thing we will skip in this tutorial is how to update the software. But when we reach a point where you might want to update the NPU, I’ll give you a link to a task showing you how.

You might need a USB keyboard to complete this tutorial.

The pictures used in this tutorial are pictures used throughout the manual, and they may not look exactly like the ones you see.

All right, let’s begin.

Getting the hardware ready.

You need to make a cable with a blue female PowerCon connector in the one end and a plug in the other end at is legal and useful in your region. On the back panel of the NPU you can see what power requirements the NPU have.

You also need an Ethernet Cat.5e cable (minimum) to connect the NPU to your switch. It’s recommended to always use a (1 Gbps) switch when connecting grandMA hardware.

Plug in the Ethernet cable and the PowerCon. If you need the NPU to output DMX, you can also connect those to the DMX ports on the back panel.

Turn on the power switch on the back panel.

If you need to update the NPU software, now could be a good time to do this. Read this task about software updating. When you have finished the update, you can continue with this tutorial.

Getting the NPU ready for the MA system.

On the front panel you should press the power button to boot the NPU. At some point in the boot process you can see a window displaying what mode the NPU was using last. It could look like this:

If you need to change the mode, you need to attach a USB keyboard and use the arrow keys to stop the automatic boot, and select the mode you need (series 1 or 2 mode). If you miss the window, you need to reboot the NPU and try again.

We need the NPU in series 2 mode. Make sure it boots in that mode by selecting to top row in the boot window.

When the boot is done, you will see a main screen like this:

You’ll probably need to change the IP address on the NPU. Press on the screen where it says “Setup”. This will give you a new window:

Here you can edit the IP address, the name and calibrate the touch screen. Our current quest is to change the IP address. Press where it says “Edit IP”. All right - you are now presented with a new window asking you to input the IP address:

To my switch I got a grandMA2 console with the IP address of 192.168.123.001 - So a good IP for the NPU could be 192.168.123.150 - Type this in the window and confirm it with “Please”. Now you get a pop-up asking you if you want to reboot:

We could reboot, but I think we should change the name of the NPU first. Press “No”.

We are now back at the NPU Setup window. Press where it says “Edit Host Name”. This presents us with a small “enter Name” pop-up.

Now if this isn’t the first time some has touched this, you might see the big pop-up already. If you don’t, we are going to pretend that we don’t have a keyboard attached (this might even be true). To expand the pop-up, you need to press the “+” in the upper left corner (if there’s a “-“ , then it can’t get any bigger!). Now the pop-up should look like this:

Type a new name using the onscreen keyboard and confirm it by pressing “Please”. And voilŕ we have a new pop-up! This is also asking if we want to reboot now. Let’s do that. Press “Yes”.

While it reboot, we can turn on the console (if you haven’t already).

Connecting to the console and the session.

When the console is ready, you should load the show you need. Then go into the SetupNetworkMA Network ConfigurationNPU Network Processing Unit Here we need to add the NPU in your system. Press the X1 key. This will open a pop-up that could look like this:

Select the NPU - if you cannot see it, then something is wrong with your network.

Now there should be a line in the NPU list.

For the NPU to connect to the session, it needs to be added as a “session member”. Press the empty cell in the “Session member” column and then press the screen encoder. This should give you a “yes” in the cell.

Now we need to start a session. Close the “MA Network Configuration” using the “X” in the upper left corner. Now go to “MA Network Control”. Here you should press the X1 key to create a new session.

The show should upload to the NPU and it should now be a part of the session. You’ll hopefully see a change on the NPU. The pulsing heart should change from this:

To this:

It's very important to know that, if a NPU is set to be a member of several sessions in a network, It will connect to the session that reaches the NPU first!! If that session is then closed - Then the NPU will connect to the next session it finds on the network, possibly creating a very different DMX output!

Setting the DMX ports on the NPU.

You might need to change the DMX ports on the NPU. Close the “MA Network Control” using the “X” in the upper right corner. Then go back into “MA Network Configuration” and press the “NPU” tab.

Now let’s change the output from the port marked “H” to input DMX to universe 1. In the configuration you should press in the cell below “XLR H” and then press the screen encoder. This opens a pop-up like this:

Here you need to change the mode to “In” and the universe to “2”. Confirm you selection by pressing “Please”. Now if you haven’t changed any of the merge settings in the SetupShowPatch Only (Live)DMX List, then the DMX input on port H will merge into the second universe. You can test this by patching some channels on universe 1 and the same on universe 2. Then connect a double male DMX cable between port A and H. On a DMX sheet you can now see that all the values on universe one are mimicked on universe 2.

Final words.

There are much more to say about the NPU. And things are different if you use it in Series 1 mode. This tutorial only covered the most common way to use the NPU. If you need to know more you should go to the NPU Manual Guide. This can point you in the right direction for more knowledge.

Topic: grandMA NDP Tutorial

In this tutorial we will take a look at the functions a NDP does offer when connected to the grandMA2 console and running in grandMA2 mode.

  • Addressing the NDP in grandMA2 mode is only possible, if the software 7.23 or onwards is installed on the NDP(s).
  • Furthermore the grandMA2 mode is streaming dependent.
  • Make sure, that all NPDs do have the same software installed. Mixed systems will cause malfunction

Software Update of the NDP

The software update of a NDP can be done with the NDP updater tool. The current version of it is not distributed via the MA Lighting webpage like all the other MA Lighting products. Contact MA Tech Support via Tel +49 5251 688865-30 (normal business hours, GMT+1) or via tech.support@malighting.com to get access to it.

Presumption: the NDP updater runs on any Windows XP / Vista / Windows 7 machine. You need to have a valid network connection to the NDPs within the same subnet and the subnet mask has to be set correctly, just as you would have to do e.g. for a grandMA series 1 onPC. There is no version available for Mac OS X or Linux stand December 2010.

What the options do:

Path to Updatefiles
if "ndp" is entered here, than the updater will use the files shipped in this particular version. As an additional feature you can also specify another path existing in your computer to use other versions stored in that path. This may be handy if you want to use the updater to upload different / other versions that you have already stored manually.
New Version
does show the version that is selected via the Path to Updatefiles option
Path to local Backup
this is the folder, where to NDP Updater tool will store the backup data of the yet to update NDP. A click on "Change Destination" will change that folder if needed. This backup can also be loaded onto the NDP again by choosing this path within the "Path to Updatefiles" field.
IP-Address
Enter the valid IP Address of the NDP you want to update. Whenever you change the value here, press the "Refresh" button next to the numerical field. When you have refreshed the IP Data field correctly, then the current version installed on the to be updated NDP is displayed here
Use only FTP for update
The option "Use only FTP for update" is very important: check this option if you experience problems using the updater in the regular mode. In this case, the backup of the NDP data to your computer will not be done and if the NDP looses power or the network connection is lost between your PC and the NDP during the update process, the flash card in the NDP will be broken. Further more the NDP will not restart automatically when the update is finished. You will have to do this manually by pressing the rest button in the frontpanel of the NDP or disconnecting AC powers to the NDP after the upload process is down. Do not interrupt the update process if "Use only FTP for update" is turned on!
Do
Press "Do" to start the process
Cancel
Press "Cancel" to interrupt running processes
  • When the "Use only FTP for update" is not checked, the NDP you are updating will do a manual reboot at the end. Afterwards you can select another NDP by entering the IP address and select "refresh".

Check the mode the NDPs are running in

To be able to connect to the NPDs, you have to change the mode the NDPs are in. To do so, use the frontpanel keys and the encoder of the NDP / keyboard and a monitor or a Telnet connection. Login as administrator in the NDP and in the NDP menu structure goto ConfigLocal Connection Interface . Change this value to GMA2. The interface can only be adjusted here and not from the console. The NDP will restart the software automatically to allow you control the NDP from a grandMA2 console.

Backup NDPs

In contrast to NDPs running in grandMA series 1 interface, there are some major differences regarding Backup NDPs. To make sure, that configuration matching and exchange between both units is working correct, both Master- and Backup NDP have to be in the same MA-Net2 session, even when running standalone without a console. The session spreads and checks configuration data of both units. In grandMA series 1 interface this was done via a configuration session ID, that was independent to a running grandMA series 1 session.

Connecting the NDPs

To be able to control and connect to NDPs you have to have a valid session started in the console and the NDPs have to be part of that session. The following lines will help you to achieve that.

  1. Goto Setup MA Network Control
  2. Check the Session ID, Session Name (Session Password) to be on the wanted settings (you cannot change these values, if you are already in a session)
  3. Click in the field Unconnected and press then press Start/Join Session to start the session.
  4. To make the NDPs join your session as well, you have to close the MA-Net control window by click the X in the upper right corner.
  5. Goto Setup MA Network Configuration NDP.
  6. Press Add Present to add all up and running NDPs available in the network. In the column Session you can see the session the NDPs are running in. Additional you can press Add to manually add the ndps you want to control here by each unit.
  7. Press EDIT and click in that field of the ndp you want to invite in the column Session Member to set it to yes.
  8. Proceed that with all the NPDs you want to take into your session
  9. Close this window by clicking the X in the upper right corner.

  • If the NDPs are already listed for a session, you cannot invite them into your session, since they are blocked. You have to get control over that session the NDPstrm are in first and then dismiss the NDPstrm to make them available for a new session.
  • Whenever you add single NDPs to your System by using the Add button, make sure that in case a Backup NDP exists to a already inserted NDP, that this one is also inserted to make the data exchange possible between both units.
  • If you want to make all NDPs to be part of you session or you want to take them out all at once, click on top of the "Session Member" column twice to mark the complete column blue and then press Edit and click in one of the Session Member fields on the screen.

Topic: grandMA Show Converter Tutorial

For this guide you will need to have the latest version of gMA 1 onPC v6.616 or above, gMA 2 onPC 2.5.3.4 or above and the conversion tool itself installed.

Please note that for the next section of this guide to work you will need to have “view hidden folders” enabled on Windows. You can gain access to this setting in Folder Options in the Control Panel.

Concept: Tasks

This section contains step-by-step instruction for common task.

For conceptual understanding of the console and property-description of each element of the console, please read the Concept and Reference sections.

Task: Hardware

This section contains all the hardware tasks.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals

This section is about the hardware connections on your console.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / Power

Before turning the console on, you need to connect the power cable.
Context
When you get a new console there's a PowerCon connector supplied with it. You need to have qualified personnel attached this connector to a suitable cable and plug that correspond with the laws in your country.

If you get a rental desk this should be supplied with it.

Steps
  1. Insert the blue PowerCon connector in the PowerCon plug and twist it 90 degrees clockwise to lock.
  2. Connect the other end of the cable to a suitable power source.
  3. You'll also need to turn on the Power switch on the back panel
Result
The power is connected.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / External Screens

You can expand the console with two external screens.
Context
On the back panel of the console you'll find two DVI-I connectors for external screens. If you only have screens with VGA connectors, you'll need a DVI to VGA adapter.
Steps
  1. Make sure the console is turned off.
  2. Connect the first screen to the top DVI-I connector marked 'Right'. Place the screen on the right side or above the internal screen 2. This will be screen number 5.
  3. Connect the second screen to the bottom DVI-I connector marked 'Left'. Place the screen on the left side of the first external screen. This will be screen number 6.
  4. Connect power to the external screens.
  5. Turn on the external screens.
  6. Turn on the console.
Result
The external screens are connected.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / Goose-neck Lamps

To get a better view of the console you can connect up to two goose-neck LED lights.
Context

The goose-neck lights can help illuminate the console in a dark environment.

Steps
  1. Connect the 4 pin XLR connector to the plug on the back panel of the console.
  2. Move and twist the lights so they feel comfortable to you and illuminate the areas you want.
Result
The lights are connected. See the link below for information on how to adjust the light output.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / USB Mouse and Keyboard

You might need to connect an external keyboard and mouse.
Context

It's recommended only to use wired keyboards and mouses. The console supports a keyboard with a US key layout.

Steps
  1. Connect the USB connector to any of the USB plugs on the console. There are up to 5 USB plugs on a console.
Result
The console should recognize the hardware you connected and after a few seconds you can use it.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / Ethernet (MA-Net)

You can connect the console to a network.
Context
The console has two Ethernet connectors. One of them is used to connect to a MA-Net network. This allows you to ad consoles (for backup or extra users), grandMA VPU, grandMA2 NPU, grandMA NDP, grandMA NSP, grandMA 2port Node and grandMA 3D.
Steps
  1. Connect one end of a Ethernet cable to the connector called 'Ethernet 1'.
  2. Connect the other end to a suitable switch.
  3. Connect other grandMA equiptment to the switch and turn on the power to the switch.
Result
The console is now connected to a network. You might need to set a IP address.

Task: Configure Airport Express

how to configure Apple Airport express as Accesspoint for MA remote
Pre-Requisite
To perform this task you need a computer with "Airport Utility" from apple.com downloaded and installed and an Apple Airport Express with default settings connected to the computer via LAN. Please refer to Apple's web-site for how to reset your Airport to factor defaults, (if you have already been fiddling around), and how to connect Airport and computer via LAN
Context
Most consumer wireless routers and access point are intended for connection to internet, and will require manual configuration to function properly on a closed local network (LAN) with no internet access (WAN).
Steps
  1. Start the Airport Utility application, locate the unconfigured Airport and press "Manual Setup"
  2. In the AirPort-menu, select the tab "Base Station"
    1. Enter a name for your Airport Express - this name is used for configuration, not for wireless access
    2. Enter (and repeat) a password for your Airport Express - this password is used for configuration, not for wireless access
    3. Disable connections time-server by unchecking "Set time automatically"
    4. Improve security by unticking "Allow setup over WAN"
  3. In the AirPort-menu, select the tab "Wireless"
    1. Enter a name (SSID) for your wireless network
    2. Select the desired security encryption (e.g. WPA2 Personal)
    3. Enter (and repeat) a password for your wireless network
  4. Select the Internet-menu, tab "Internet Connection"
    1. For the Ethernet WAN port, select "Ethernet Disabled"
  5. In the Internet-menu, select the tab "TCP/IP"
    1. As we are not connected to internet set Configure IPv4 to "Manually"
    2. Enter a dummy IP for Router Address (e.g. 192.168.99.1)
    3. Enter a dummy IP for DNS Address (e.g. 192.168.99.1)
  6. In the Internet-menu, select the tab "DHCP"
    1. For DHCP beginning address, select "192.168" and enter the third number to match you MA-net network (e.g. "192.168" . "1")
    2. For DHCP beginning/end address, enter the fourth numbers that determine the IP-range to give wireless clients (e.g. "201" to "210")
  7. Press the "Update" -button in the lower right corner
    1. confirm any dialogs to do update and reset the Airport
Result
Your Airport should now be functional to use as an Access point for MA remote and a console or onPC (remember to disable Firewalls). Please note that this is a basic setup for a standalone/small system. To set up wireless accesspoints in a comlex network, please consult a Network Systems Engineer for recommendation on proper hardware and configuration

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / ArtNet (Ethernet)

You can connect the console to ArtNet.
Context
The console has two Ethernet connectors. One of them is used to connect to a MA-Net network. The other is intended for ArtNet, and is by factory default set to an address in the 2.x.x.x range. You may check or change the IP-address of this second adapter via the SetIP keyword.

For ArtNet, the console will look for an Ethernet adapter with 2.x.x.x or 10.x.x.x address. - in other words, if you change the IP of the second Ethernetport to something other than 2.x.x.x / 10.x.x.x you will not be able to transmit or receive Artnet.

OnPC will look for the same IP-adresses. If not found, OnPC will try to create a 2.x.x.x address on the Network-adaptor chosen for MA-net

Steps
  1. Connect one end of a Ethernet cable to the connector called 'Ethernet 2'.
  2. Connect the other end to a suitable switch.
  3. Connect other ArtNet equipment to the switch and turn on the power to the switch.
Result
The console is now connected to a network.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / DMX

Connecting DMX to input or output DMX from the console.
Context
The console has six DMX Output plugs (marked A to F) and one Input (marked IN). These are used when you want the console to output DMX and you need to use DMX in. All connectors can be configured to meet your needs.
Steps
  1. Connect one end of a 5 pin XLR DMX cable to one of the XLR connectors.
  2. Connect the other end to a suitable DMX device.
Result
The console is now connected to a DMX device. Follow the link below to read more about setting up the DMX connectors.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / MIDI

Connecting MIDI to your console.
Context
The console have two MIDI connectors. One in and one out. They are used to send and receive MIDI signals.
Steps
  1. Connect one end of a MIDI cable to the Input or Output. Depending on you are sending or receiving.
  2. Connect the other end to a suitable MIDI device.
Result
The console is now connected to a MIDI device.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / SMPTE (LTC)

Connecting a SMPTE source to the console.
Context
The console have LTC In connector. This allow you to sync the console to a SMPTE timecode source.
Steps
  1. Connect the SMPTE source to the LTC IN connector in the console using a 3 pin XLR audio cable. The signal strength should be minimum 200 mili Volts. Pin1: ground; Pin2: - (minus); Pin3: + (plus)
Result
The console is now connected to a SMPTE source.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / Sound

Connecting a sound source to the console. Sound-in function is prepared in several menues, but still without function.
Context
The console have Audio In connector. This allow you to use the incoming audio to trigger lights.
Steps
  1. Connect the audio source to the Audio IN connector in the console using a 3 pin XLR audio cable. The signal strength should be minimum 20 mili Volts. Pin1: ground; Pin2 and 3: balanced input
Result
The console is now connected to a audio source.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / grandMA2 faderwing

Connecting a grandMA2 faderwing to the console.
Context
You can expand the number of executor faders and buttons with grandMA2
Steps
  1. Connect one end of a 15 pin D-Sub cable to the connector marked MA-LINK on the console.
  2. Connect the other end to the grandMA2 faderwing.
    You can connect up to four grandMA2 faderwings to one console. You can connect one grandMA2 faderwing to another and so forth.
  3. Connect power to the grandMA2 faderwing.
Result
You've added 15 motorized faders and 15 executor buttons.

Task: Hardware / Connecting peripherals / Contact Closure Switch (Analog Remote)

Connecting contact closure switches to the console / command wing.
Context
The console / command wing has a D-sub connector. This allow you to connect contact closure switches. You can map these switches to anything in your console.

You need to make a switch that sends between +5 and +15 volts to pin 1 for the console to react to analog input number 1.

The console has a 25 pin D-sub, enabling 16 remote inputs: pin 1-16 = input 1-16, pin 21-22 = +5V, pin 25 = common ground

The Command Wing has a 15 pin D-sub, enabling 12 remote inputs: pin 1-6, 9-14 = input, pin 7 = +5V, pin 8 = common ground

Steps
  1. Connect a D-sub plug to the DC Remote Control connector.
Result
The console now have a analog remote input. Follow the link below to read more about setting up the Remote Input.
Note: CAUTION: The DC REMOTE CONTROL connector of MA onPC command wing has different contact assignment.

Pin 1-6: channels 1,3,5,7,9,11

Pin 7: +5V

Pin8: ground

Pin 9-14: channels 2,4,6,8,10,12

Pin 15: not used

Connect channel with +5V (Pin 7) or connect channel with extern current 5 - 10V and ground (Pin8). Note: channels have switch function only!

Task: Hardware / Miscellaneous hardware tasks

This section contains hardware tasks

Task: Hardware / Misc. / Turn the Console On

You need to turn on the console before doing anything fun with it.
Context
You'll probably need to turn on the console before using it.
Steps
  1. Make sure the console is connected to a prober power source and the power switch on the back panel is turned on.
  2. Press the power key on the front panel. It looks like this:
Result
The console will boot up.

Task: Hardware / Misc. / Resetting the console using the reset button (hard reset)

ON the back panel of the console you'll find a reset button. This is used when there's no other option.
Context
Should you ever come in the situation that the console is totally non responsive and there's noting that reacts. You have the option to reboot the console.

Anything that has changes since the last save will be lost!

Steps
  1. Press the reset button on the back panel.
Result
This resets the console and it reboots. It will try to load the last saved version of your show.

Task: Hardware / Misc. / Turn the Console Off

Sometimes you need to turn off the console.
Context
At some point you'll probably need to turn off the console.
Steps
  1. Press the power key on the front panel. It looks like this:
    A warning pop-up appears.
  2. To turn off the console you need to confirm the pop-up by pressing 'Yes'.
Result
The console will save the show and boot down. NOTE: only with the power switch (on the back side) on "0" the console is power-off!

Task: Adjusting the angle of the Display Wing

Context
To improve the readability of the screens and the ergonomics of the touch-interface, you should raise the Display Wing to an appropriate angle
When lowering the wing, make sure nothing gets caught between the wing and the console, as this area has a potentional risk of hand or finger injurey.
Steps
  1. Press and hold the MA key
  2. Decide which direction to move:
    • To raise, press and hold the Up key
    • To lower, press and hold the Down key
    The motor slowly changes the angle
  3. Release both keys
    The motor will stop, and lock the wing in position
    Instead of using the motors, you may press and hold MA & Set to release the torque and then adjust the angle by hand
Result

Task: Adjusting the brightness of the Console

Adjusting brightness of console via hardkeys.
Context
LCD screens, Executor LEDs, Key Backlight and Gooseneck worklights all may have their brightness adjusted, to try to compensate for (or to blend into) the surronding environment.

You will normally do this adjustment via the Setup Console Desk Light menu, however some of these elements may be adjusted directly via special hardkey combinations, even while the console is Booting:

The following elements has its own shortcut via the numeric keypad:

  1. Gooseneck Worklights
  2. Wing Screen(s) (screen 2-5)
  3. Command Screen (screen 1)
  4. Key Backlighting

Steps
  1. Press and hold MA and the key for the desired element
    press and hold both MA & 4 to adjust the key backlighting
  2. Decide which direction to move:
    • To increase the brightness, press and hold the + key
    • To decrease the brightness, press and hold the - key
    The brightness of the element is changed.
  3. Release all keys
    The brightness-level is set, and stored in your UserProfile.

Task: Adjusting the volume of the internal speaker

Adjusting sound out via commandline.
Context
The console may provide aural feedback of your operation of the console, (keypress-clicks, warning sounds etc.) via the internal speaker. You may adjust the level of these sounds, via the Specialmaster "Snd Out"
Steps
  1. Enter SpecialMaster (or merely SM), then "Snd Out", followed by At, and the desired level
    [Channel]>SpecialMaster "Snd out" At 0
    You may also assign the Specialmaster to an executor, or the 100mm faders, for direct adjustment.
    The volume of the internal speaker (and thereby any sound-effects) is set to the given level

Topic: NPU Hardware tasks.

This is a small selection of hardware tasks for the NPU.

There are currently these three NPU hardware tasks.

Task: Hardware / NPU / Connecting a NPU to a network.

This explains how to connect the NPU hardware to a MA system.
Context
It's recommended to use a good 1Gbit network switch for you MA system. And you should minimum use cat. 5e cables.
Steps
  1. On the back panel for the grandMA NPU you'll find one Ethernet connector. Plug one end of a network cable in this port.
  2. Connect the other end to one of the ports in your network switch. Make sure you use a port that gives you full access to the MA-Net.
Result
You have connected the grandMA NPU to you MA system. The next task takes you through connecting the power. There's also a task for adding the grandMA NPU to you session.

Task: Hardware / NPU / Connecting power to a NPU.

This explains how to connect the power to the NPU hardware.
Context
It's important that you use an appropriate power source for your NPU. There's no UPS build into the NPU.
Steps
  1. On the back panel for the grandMA NPU you'll find one PowerCon connector. Plug a female (blue) connector to this plug.
  2. Connect the other end of the cable to an appropriate connector.
Result
You have connected power to the grandMA NPU.

Task: Hardware / NPU / Turning on the NPU.

This task will show you the simple task of turning on the NPU.
Context
When the power is connected, you can turn the NPU on.
Steps
  1. On the back panel of the grandMA NPU, you'll find a red power switch. Set this to "on".
    The light in the switch should turn on. If it doesn't then there's something wrong with the power source.
  2. On the front panel there's a small power button. Pressing this shortly will boot the grandMA NPU.
Result
The NPU boots up and you are shortly presented with a menu asking you if you'll change the mode. If you don't do anything, then the NPU will boot up in the last used mode.

Task: Software

This section contains all the software tasks.

Task: Install and update the software

This section contains all tasks about installing and updating the software.

Task: Updating console software

New software are released regularly with new features and bug-fixes. Depending on the loaded version two methods are possible. Modus 1: Update direct from Linux -formatted USB stick for devices up to software version 2.7. Modus 2: Update direct from Windows-formatted USB stick or via network. All devices must have software version 2.8 and higher.
Pre-Requisite

Modus 1: to perform this task you need to have a MAC or Windows PC (XP, Vista or Windows 7) with StickMAker installed, an empty USB-stick larger than 2Gb, and a keyboard connected to your console. Modus 2: to perform this task you need a Windows PC (XP, Vista or Windows 7) and an empty USB stick larger than 2Gb (Windows FAT 32 formatted).

StickMaker & Console image Download Page

Note: Follow steps 1 - 13 for update in modus 1.
Steps
  1. Download the most recent software-image (.imgz) from MA Lighting
  2. Insert USB stick into your computer
  3. Start the application StickMAker and select your USB stick from the pull-down curtain of the topmost green field.
  4. Select Write Image to disk and browse for the downloaded image by pressing [...]
  5. Press Start then confirm with Yes
    When progress-bar is full, you should get a pop-up with "Copy operation succeeded". StickMAker formatted the stick to Linux, all update files were installed.
  6. Press OK, remove stick from computer.
  7. Switch on Console and await for the boot menu.
    The Boot Menu is only displayed for a few seconds, - be ready to perform next step within that time.
  8. By using the arrow and Enter/Please keys of the keyboard, select Utility Menu (item 3)
    Console continues to boot and prepare Utility Menu
  9. Insert USB-stick with image into USB-port and await a few second for the USB to initialize
  10. When GMA2 UTILITY menu is displayed, select Import new Version by pressing the Enter/Please key
    If you get a message "Nothing to Import", the USB is not yet initialized, try again in 5 seconds
    Console displays "Importing files from USB-Devices, please wait" then returns to Utility menu
  11. By using the arrow and Enter/Please keys of the keyboard, select Choose Version
    Console list imported versions after a few seconds
  12. By using the arrow and Enter/Please keys of the keyboard, select the version you just imported
    Console installs imported version, then returns to Utility menu
  13. By using the arrow and Enter/Please keys of the keyboard, select Quit
    Console reboots and you may remove the USB-stick
Steps
  1. Follow steps 1-9 for update in modus 2. The deviced from which the update is startet (source device) must always connected with the USB stick. The target device must connected with the source device via network.
  2. Download update files (xyz.update) from MA homepage and store in main directory of the stick. Create no folders.
  3. Connect USb stick with device.
  4. Open menu SETUP / CONSOLE / SOFTWARE UPDATE and tab UPDATE.
  5. Select devices to update. Update is only possible with the appropriate device-dependent software.
  6. Press button UPDATE DEVICES. On the target device an Pop-Up opens for 10 Seconds. Within this time transmission of the software can be canceled. Without action transmission starts automatically. Do not switch off devices during transmission.
  7. After transmission a Pop-Up opens on the target device. Within 10 seconds a reboot of this target device can be canceled. Without action the reboot starts
  8. A reboot of the target device is absolutely necessary
  9. Remove USB stick.
Result
You console should now be updated with the latest software-version.

Task: Reinstall console software and OS via USB

How to get a clean install of software and OS
Pre-Requisite
To perform this task you need to have a Mac or Windows PC (XP, Win 7 or Vista) with StickMAker installed, an empty USB-stick larger than 2Gb, and a keyboard connected to your console.

Additionally you need in advance to backup any data you wish to keep, as this procedure totally overwrites the hard-drive of the console

StickMaker & Console image Download Page

Steps
  1. Download the most recent software-image (.imgz) from MA Lighting
  2. Insert USB stick into your computer
  3. Start the application StickMAker and select your USB stick from the pull-down curtain of the topmost green field.
  4. Select Write Image to disk and browse for the downloaded image by pressing [...]
  5. Press Start then confirm with Yes
    When progress-bar is full, you should get a pop-up with "Copy operation succeeded"
  6. Press OK, remove stick from computer, and insert stick into console
  7. With stick inserted, switch on console.
    If console starts normally you need to first enable USB-boot, see Related Links at bottom of page
    Console boots from the USB and gives you a menu with several choices
  8. By using the arrow up/down keys, highlight MA Installer
    BootOptions at bottom of screen displays: ....other=install,nox,usbboot,usbdata|
  9. Use left arrow key to move cursor between equal-sign and "install", then type "full"
    BootOptions at bottom of screen displays: ....other=fullinstall,nox,usbboot,usbdata
  10. Press Enter/Please to select MA Installer with the fullinstall option
    Console continues to boot and prepare installation
  11. When prompted, press Enter/Please to confirm formatting of the hard-drive
    Console formats hard-drive and prepare for installation
  12. When prompted, press Enter/Please to confirm installation of OS and Software
    New OS and software is installing
  13. When prompted, remove USB-stick and confirm with Enter/Please-key to reboot
  14. Let the console boot in grandMA2 mode.
  15. Calibrate touchscreens
Result
You console should now have a clean install. Please remember that all data has been erased, and the IP-adress of you console is now the default 192.168.0.4

Task: Boot from unknown USB stick

Pre-Requisite
To perform this task you need an external keyboard (with F11) connected and a bootable USB stick made with the StickMAker.
Context
If you have not dedicated a specific USB stick to use for software-updates, and enabled this stick in BIOS, you need an external keyboard with F11 for selection of boot-device, to do software-updates.
Steps
  1. Insert bootable USB stick made with Stickmaker, and switch on Console,
  2. During startup press F11 multiple times to get the Select Boot Device menu
    If you are not able to trigger this menu with F11, and console boots normally, you need to enter BIOS to enable boot from this USB stick. Please see Related Links at bottom of page.
  3. Navigate with arrowkeys to your USB stick, and press Enter/Please
    Console boots from USB, and gives you a menu with several choises
Result
You may now proceed with installation of software via USB

Task: Enable console to boot from a dedicated USB stick

Pre-Requisite
To perform this task you need a keyboard connected and a bootable USB stick made with the StickMAker.
Context
If you have a dedicated USB-stick to use for software-updates, you may perform this task once, to enable the console to prioritize boot from this specific USB-stick, eliminating the need for an external keyboard with F11 for selection of boot-device, to do software-updates.
Steps
  1. Insert bootable USB-stick made with StickMAker, and switch on Console,
  2. On the keyboard press Del to enter Bios setup
  3. If prompted for password, enter helpg2 and perform the following steps
    1. Navigate with arrow-keys to Bios Security Features
    2. Press Enter/Please 3 times to remove password
    3. Press Esc to return to main menu
  4. Navigate with arrow-keys to Boot Configuration Features, and press Enter/Please
  5. Navigate with arrow-keys to Hard Disk Drives, and press Enter/Please
  6. Press Enter/Please to change what is "1st drive", and select your USB-stick with arrow-keys and Enter/Please.
  7. Press Esc two times to exit to main menu
  8. Navigate with arrow-keys to Save changes and Exit, and press Enter/Please two times
Result
Your console should now boot from USB if it is switched on with this USB-stick inserted.

Task: Restart grandMA2 application after a crash

Pre-Requisite
To perform this task you need a keyboard connected to your console (only for GMA-Ultralight and GMA-Replay Unit)
Context
If you experience a software crash, the console will return to the Linux OS command-shell, recognized by a text-mode display on screen 1 with black background and system messages in white and yellow text, - and at the bottom in green "root@gma2 #". To restart the application without rebooting the console follow the steps below.
Steps
  1. Press arrow-up on your keyboard.
    Bottom line displays "root@gma2 # Autostart". If "Autostart" is not recorded, it must be typed in via keyboard.
  2. Press Enter/Please to execute the Autostart command
    The grandMA2 application starts and you should be up and running in seconds.
  3. If the application immediately crash again, your showfile may be corrupt and you need to proceed with the following
  4. Press arrow-up on your keyboard.
    Bottom line displays "root@gma2 # Autostart"
  5. Type noload on your keyboard.
    Bottom line displays "root@gma2 # Autostart noload"
  6. Press Enter/Please to execute the Autostart /noload command
    The grandMA2 application starts with an empty showfile
  7. Load a backupcopy of the file or a previous version of your show via the backup-menu

Task: Software / Setup

This contains all the Software Setup Tasks

Task: Software / Setup / Create New Show

This task will create a new show.
Context
This task will create a new show on the internal hard drive of the console.
Steps
  1. Press Backup.
    This will give you the Backup Menu. It looks something like this:

  2. Make sure the 'Internal' tap is selected.
  3. Press New Show.
    This gives you the New Show pop-up. It looks something like this:

  4. In the New Show pop-up, write a new name for the show.
  5. Select the options you want to clear.
    • Clear Show Data - This will erase all patch, sequences, presets, groups, macros, etc.
    • Clear Time Config - This will set all the fade, delay, OutFade, etc. back to the default timing options.
    • Clear Local Settings -This will set all the console options (intensity buttons, intensity screens..) back to the default options.
    • Clear Global Settings -This will set all settings (TELNET, Remotes, Login ...) to the default optinon.
    • Clear Network Protocols -This will erase all the settings for DMX out via Ethernet.
    • Clear Network Config -This will erase all the informations regarding grandMA2 NPU's, grandMA VPU's, other grandMA2 consoles, grandMA2 3D, etc.
    • Clear User Profiles -This will erase the users and the user profiles.
  6. Press the Please key.
    Alternative you can use the command line:
    [Channel]>Newshow "playground" /full
    This will create a new, completely empty show with the name "playground".
Result
You have created a new show.

Task: Software / Setup / Save a Show

This will save the current show with a new name.
Context
There are three ways to do this. The first is the fastest. The second is the slowest, but with more control. The third uses the command line.

It's almost never a bad idea to save your show. And with grandMA2, it's so fast that you are not spending time waiting for the console to save.

Steps
  1. Press the Backup key fast twice.
    You trigger a build in macro that saves your current show.
Steps
  1. Press the Backup key (once).
    This opens the Backup Menu.
  2. Select the drive (or tap) where you want the show saved.
    This is also the way to store the show on a USB memory stick.
  3. Press the Save Show button.
    You have saved your current show in the drive you selected.
Steps
  1. [Channel]>Saveshow
    You have stored the current show on the current selected drive.
Result
No matter what way you use, you save your show data.

Task: Software / Setup / Save a Show with a New Name

This will save the current show with a new name.
Context
There are two ways to do this. The first uses the GUI. The second uses the command line.
Steps
  1. Press the Backup key (once).
    This opens the Backup Menu.
  2. Select the drive (or tap) where you want the show saved.
    This is also the way to store the show with a new name on a USB memory stick.
  3. Press the Save Show As button.
    A pop-up appears prompting you to write a new name.
  4. Write the new name and finish with the Please key.
    Your show is saved with a new name.
Steps
  1. [Channel]>Saveshow "playground2"
    You have saved the current show with a new name on the current selected drive.
Result
No matter what way you used, you saved your show data.

Task: Software / Setup / Auto Save a Show

This will set a time interval at with the desk will store the show automatically.
Context
The grandMA2 has an Auto save feature. This will automatically store the show after a specified interval.
Steps
  1. Press the Backup key.
    This opens the Backup Menu.
  2. At the bottom of the window there's a the Auto Save options. Press the button under the text 'Auto Save' until you have the desired time interval.
Result
This will start a count down. When it reaches 0 the desk will store the show and restart the count down.

Task: Software / Setup / Load a Show

This will load a show.
Context
There are two ways to do this. The first uses the GUI. The second uses the command line.
Steps
  1. Press the Backup key.
    This opens the Backup Menu.
  2. Select the drive (or tap) where the show (you want to load) is saved.
    This is also the way to load a show from a USB memory stick.
  3. Press the Load Show button.
    This opens the Load Show pop-up.
  4. Select the show you want to load. On the right side of the pop-up you can select, what parts of the show you want to load.
  5. When you are happy with your selection you press the Ok button.
    The desk loads the new show.
Steps
  1. [Channel]>Loadshow "playground2"
    If you don't know the name of the show you can see a list of show on the current selected drive using the command Listshow.
    The desk loads the show.
Result
No matter what way you used, the new show is loaded.

Task: Software / Setup / Delete a Show

This will delete a show.
Context
There are two ways to do this. The first uses the GUI. The second uses the command line.
Steps
  1. Press the Backup key.
    This opens the Backup Menu.
  2. Select the drive (or tap) where the show you want to delete is saved.
    This is also the way to delete a show from a USB memory stick.
  3. Press the Delete Show button.
    This opens the Delete Show pop-up.
  4. Select the show you want to delete.
  5. When you are happy with your selection, you press the Ok button.
    If you changes your mind you can press the Cancel button or close the pop-up. This doesn't delete anything.
    The show is deleted.
Steps
  1. [Channel]>Deleteshow "playground2"
    If you don't know the name of the show you can see a list of show on the current selected drive using the command Listshow.
    The desk deletes the show from the drive.
Result
No matter what way you used, the new show is loaded.

Task: Software / Setup / Create New User and login

This task will create a new user and login as that user.
Context
This task will create a new show on the internal hard drive of the console.
Steps
  1. Press Setup.
    This gives you the 'Console section in the Setup Menu.
  2. Make sure the 'Console' tap is selected.
  3. Press 'User+Profiles Setup'.
    This gives you the User and User Profiles section. It looks something like this:

    In a new show there are only the grayed out Administrator and Guest users. These are defaults and can't be deleted or altered.

  4. Press the headline saying 'Showing 'Users''.
  5. Press the X1 key to add a new user (you might need to highlight the 'New' word).
    This creates a new user with the user name "user".
  6. Edit the name using the encoder to highlight the user name and then press the screen encode. Write your own name.
  7. Add a password if you like.
  8. If you want the user to have it own views and user setting, you need to create a new user profile:
    1. Highlight the 'New' cell in the 'UserProfiles' section.
    2. Press the screen encoder
      This creates a new User Profile.
    3. Give the User Profile a name that makes sense to you. There are many ways to organize the users and user profiles. So choose one that makes sense to you.
    This creates a new User profile.
  9. Select the new User Profile for your User.
  10. You can also change the user rights. This option allows you the set different levels of editing rights. Follow the link below to read more about the different rights.
  11. This is what you need to create a User and a User Profile. Exit the setup menu.
  12. To login as your new user you need to press the Tools key
  13. Then press the 'Login' button.
    This gives you the Login screen.
  14. Type the User name and the password (if any) followed by a Please.
    You can also login using the commandline:
    [Channel]>login username password
Result
You have created a new user and logged in as this user..

Task: Software / Setup / Patch Conventionals

In this task we will patch some generic dimmers.
Pre-Requisite
Before doing this task you should create a new empty show. If you don't want to do that, you should go to the next task "Patch Moving Lights".
Context
In this task we will patch some generic dimmers.
Steps
  1. Press Setup.
    This gives you the Setup Menu.
  2. Make sure the 'Show' tap is selected.
  3. Press 'Patch & Fixture Schedule'.
    Since this is the first time you enter the patch, it will guide you through the proper steps. The first step asks for a layer name. It looks something like this:

    In a new show there aren't any layers or fixtures and the console guide us through the steps the first time.

  4. Type "Dimmers" followed by a Please.
    This gives you the Fixture Wizard pop-up. It looks like this:

  5. On the right side of this window there's a list of the imported fixturetypes. Currently there aren't any, so press where it says 'From Library'.
    This gives you the Select a FixtureType pop-up.
  6. In the 'Manufacturer Filter' type "generic".
  7. Select 'generic@dimmer@oo.xmlp' and press the 'Ok' button.
  8. In the name area type "Dim 1"
    When you add a number behind some text (or another number) with a space between the console will automatically increase the number.
  9. The Quantity should be "40".
    This gives us 40 dimmers.
  10. Fixture ID should be "0".
    This will make sure the dimmers doesn't have a fixture ID.
  11. Channel ID should be "1".
    This gives the first dimmer a channel ID of "1", the second will have channel ID "2", etc.
  12. We are going to patch the 40 dimmers in the first universe beginning at DMX address 1. So in the Patch area type "1.1".
  13. Now press the 'Apply' button.
    This finishes the Fixture Wizard and patches the 40 dimmers. It should look something like this:

  14. Close the Edit Setup by pressing the yellow 'X' in the upper right corner.
    This gives you a warning pop-up.
  15. Confirm that you would like the save by pressing the 'Yes' button.
    You are back in the Setup Menu you could close this as well.
Result
You have patched 40 dimmer channels in your show.

Task: Software / Setup / Patch Moving Lights

In this task we will patch some moving lights.
Context
In this task we will patch 12 VL500 from Vari Lite.
Steps
  1. Press Setup.
    This gives you the Setup Menu.
  2. Make sure the 'Show' tap is selected.
  3. Press 'Patch & Fixture Schedule'.
  4. To organize the fixtures, we need a new Layer. Right click the 'New' under "Showing 'Layers'".
    You can also highlight the 'New' and press the screen encoder to create a new layer.
    This gives you a pop-up asking for a name of the new layer.
  5. In the pop-up type "VL500" followed by a Please.
  6. On the right side of the screen you can see the content of the layer. Right now it's empty. Right click the 'New'.
    This opens the Fixture Wizard pop-up.
  7. On the right side of this window there's a list of the imported fixturetypes. Currently there are only the dimmers, so press where it says 'From Library'.
    This gives you the Select a FixtureType pop-up.
  8. In the 'Manufacturer Filter' type "vari".
  9. Scroll down and select 'varilite@vl500@16-bit.xmlp' and press the 'Ok' button.
  10. In the name area type "VL500 1"
  11. The Quantity should be "15".
  12. Fixture ID should be "101".
    This will make sure the fixtures are visible (and controllable) in the fixture sheet.
  13. Channel ID should be "101".
    This will make sure the fixtures are also visible in a channel sheet.
  14. We are going to manually patch the VL 500's. So in the Patch area type "0".
    This will create the fixtures, but will not patch them.
  15. Now press the 'Apply' button.
  16. Now we are going to patch the VL500's. Click hold and drag with the mouse in the 'Patch' column of all the VL500's. Then right click.
    This opens the DMX Patch pop-up.
  17. Without doing any thing else right click next where it says "VL500 1"
    This opens the calculator where you can enter a new patch number.
  18. Type "1.51" followed by Please.
    This patches the dimmer channel of the VL500's. This fixture type uses an external dimmer for the intensity. And therefore needs two patch numbers for each fixture.
  19. Repeat step 16.
    This opens the DMX Patch again.
  20. Now you can see the patch numbers of the fixtures and on the right side you can see the patch in the DMX universe. On the left side below the fixture list you can see two options called "DIM" and "PAN". Press the one called "PAN" or the X2 key.
    This changes the patch focus to the second part of the fixture.
  21. Make sure there's a blue frame around the gray cells on the left side, and then right click the top cell.
  22. Type "2.1" followed by a Please.
    This patches the second part of all the VL500's to the first DMX address on the second universe.
  23. You have patched all the VL500's and can close the Patch & Fixture Schedule by pressing the yellow "X" in the upper right corner.
    This gives you a warning pop-up.
  24. Confirm that you would like the save by pressing the 'Yes' button.
    You are back in the Setup Menu you could close this as well.
Result
You have patched 15 Vari Lite VL500's in your show.

Task: Software / Setup / Create a View

Creating a channel windows.
Context
When you create a new show or a new user, your screens will (almost) be empty. We are going to have a look at creating a view.
Steps
  1. Choose an empty space on your screens, and press it.
    This gives you the Create Basic Window pop-up.
  2. Select the 'Sheets' tap.
    This allows you to choose one of the sheet windows.
  3. Press where it says 'Channel'.
    Some windows have a minimum space requirement. A channel sheet have a minimum of 3 x 2 tiles.
Result
This creates a channel sheet.

Task: Software / Setup / Clear a Screen

Lets' look at clearing a screen
Context
A clean screen can be a nice beginning for a new view. You can delete one or more of your windows and eventually end up with a clear screen, but there's another option.
Steps
  1. Press and hold the O (encoder) key
    A small pop-up appears in the lower right corner of each screen. It looks like this:

  2. Press 'Clear Screen' to empty the screen you are pressing or press 'Clear All Screens' to clear all the screens.
Result
You have cleared the screen(s).

Task: Software / Setup / Store a View on a ViewButton.

In this task we will store a view on a ViewButton.
Pre-Requisite
In this task we assume that there aren't any views stored on any ViewButtons.
Context
There are many ways to store a view, this task will introduce you to storing a view on a ViewButton.
Steps
  1. Create a view to your likings.
  2. Press Store followed by the V1 key.
    You can also press on the preview area next to the keys.
    This gives you a Store View Options pop-up.
  3. In the pop-up you can give the view a name.
    I made a channel window - so I call my view "Channel"
  4. Now you select the screens you want included in your view.
    I only want to store screen 2, and it's allready marked.
    If you only store one screen, the view isn't "locked" to that screen. Meaning if you recall that view in a screen of similar or higher resolution, the view will also appear on that screen.
  5. Press Please.
    We stored a view. Notice a small preview of your view appear on the ViewButton next to the V1 key. It could look like this:

    on the onPC it just looks like this:

Result
The view is stored on ViewButton 1

Task: Software / Setup / Store a View on a UserButton.

In this task we will store a view on a UserButton.
Context
There are many ways to store a view, this task will introduce you to storing a view on a UserButton.
Steps
  1. Create a view to your likings.
  2. Press the User 1 key
    This changes the buttons at the bottom of screen 1 to user buttons.
  3. Press Store followed by the X1 key.
    You can also press the area above the keys.
    This gives you a Store View Options pop-up.
  4. In the pop-up you can give the view a name.
    I made a Commandline Feedback window - so I call my view "Command Line"
  5. Now you select the screens you want included in your view.
    I only want to store screen 1, so I select screen 1 in the pop-up.
    If you only store one screen, the view isn't "locked" to that screen. Meaning if you recall that view in a screen of similar or higher resolution, the view will also appear on that screen.
  6. Press Please.
    We stored a view. The UserButton now looks like this:

Result
The view is stored on UserButton 1

Task: Sostware / Setup / Recall a View

A look at recalling views.
Context
There are two basic ways to recall a view.
Steps
  1. Press any of the stored view buttons or user buttons containing a view (or their on screen version).
Steps
  1. Using the hardkeys to recall view.
    View 1 Please - This recalls view number 1.
Result
What ever way you choose, you should have recalled your view.

Task: Software / Setup / Delete a View

A small look at deleting views.
Context
To have the complete overview of all your views, you should open a View Pool.
Steps
  1. Pressing delete followed by a ViewButton or a UserButton don't delete the view, it just empties the button. To delete a view you need to delete the view in a view pool or use the hardkeys.
    Del View 1 Please - deletes view 1.
Result
Deleting a view also removes it from any ViewButtons or UserButtons where it was assigned.

Task: Software / Setup / Calibrate the Touchscreens

This task will take you through the process of calibrating a touchscreen.
Context
After a full install or when the touchscreen isn't precise you need to calibrate your screen(s).
Steps
  1. Press the Setup key.
  2. Select the 'Console' tap.
  3. Press the 'Screen Options' Button
  4. Press the button corresponding to the screen you want to calibrate.
    This opens a blue calibration screen that looks like this:

  5. Follow the instructions on screen (Please Touch the Blinking Symbol until Beep or Stop Blinking)
  6. Repeat for all four points in the screen.
    When done you'll return to the 'Screen Options'. If needed you can repeat the process for the other screens.
Result
Your touchscreen has been calibrated.

Task: Software / Setup / Setting the IP address

Setting the IP address on the console can be necessary when connecting the console to other equipment.
Context
This task will take you through the steps of setting the IP address using the setup menu.
Steps
  1. Press the Setup key.
  2. Select the 'Network' tab.
  3. Press the 'MA Network Control' button.
  4. If there's a session running you need to stop it. Do this by pressing the 'Leave Session' button or the X2 key. If you are in any doubt, just press it.
  5. Press the current IP address (the default address is 192.168.0.4)
    When using the onPC you need to set the IP address in your computer.
    This will give you the calculator pop-up (on the onPC you get a selection of the available IP addresses)
  6. Type the new IP address (with the onPC you can select the desired address - make sure it's a wired connection)
  7. Reboot the console
Result
When the console is back from the reboot, you have a new IP address.

Topic: Import

This section is about importing Effects, Macros, Fixture Profiles, Colors, Gobos and Bitmaps using different methods.

There are currently three different importing methods described here: Command line, GUI and FTP connection.

Read the following pages for each method.

Topic: Import / Using Command Line

When using the Command line you can import a lot of things.

There are one window that makes sense when importing using the Command line. It's the Command Line Window. With this you can see how the console reacts to your input.

Read the following pages for details about each section.

Task: Import / Using Commandline / Effects from USB

We are going to import some effects using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and an effect XML file. You can download one by right-clicking (and select "saving as..") the following link: default effects (it's a link to a XML file with effects - this link doesn't work on the console). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "effects". It would also be a good idea to have a Commandline Feedback window, so you can see the respond from the console.
Context
This will take you through some of the commands used when importing effects.
Steps
  1. First we need to point the console in the right direction (the USB stick!). The command we need is called "SelectDrive" and it can be shortened to "SD". In the command line type:
    [Channel]>SD
    The commandline feedback displays a list of the available drives.
  2. We need to select the USB stick (it might be your drive number three). You do this with the "SD" command. For me the USB stick is drive number three. So I type:
    [Channel]>SD4
    This makes the USB stick the default drive (also for saving shows).
  3. We need to tell the console where we want the effect. so we need to change the directory to the effect folder. Type:
    [Channel]>cdeffect
    This will change the directory to the effect folder.
  4. If you want to check the stick for effect files you can use the command "ListEffectLibrary", it's shortened to "ListEf". In the commandline type:
    Effects/1 'Global' >ListEf
    This will display the effect xml files on the drive.
  5. Now you can also see the name of the file we need to import. The file on my drive is called "PredefinedEffects". And the command we need is called "Import". So I type:
    Effects/1 'Global' >Import PredefinedEffects
    This will import all the effects in the xml file, and place them after the last used effects ID. You can see the list of effects by typing "list".
Result
You have now imported effects from an xml file on an USB stick.
Post-Requisite
If you need to return to your default destination and drive you need to type:

Effects/1 'Global' >cd/

and

[Channel]>sd 1

Task: Import / Using Commandline / Macros from USB

We are going to import some macros using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a macro XML file. You can download one by right-clicking (and select "saving as..") the following link: predefined macros (it's a link to a XML file with macros - this link doesn't work on the console). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "macros". It would also be a good idea to have a Commandline Feedback window, so you can see the respond from the console.
Context
This will take you through some of the commands used when importing macros.
Steps
  1. First we need to point the console in the right direction (the USB stick!). The command we need is called "SelectDrive" and it can be shortened to "SD". In the command line type:
    [Channel]>SD
    The commandline feedback displays a list of the available drives.
  2. We need to select the USB stick (it might be your drive number three). You do this with the "SD" command. For me the USB stick is drive number three. So I type:
    [Channel]>SD4
    This makes the USB stick the default drive (also for saving shows).
  3. We need to tell the console where we want the macros. so we need to change the directory to the macro folder. Type:
    [Channel]> cd macro
    This will change the directory to the macro folder.
  4. If you want to check the stick for macro files you can use the command "ListMacroLibrary", it's shortened to "ListM". In the commandline type:
    Macros/1 'Global' >ListM
    This will display the macro xml files on the drive.
  5. Now you can also see the name of the file we need to import. The file on my drive is called "predefined". And the command we need is called "Import". So I type:
    Macros/1 'Global' >Import predefined
    This will import all the macros in the xml file, and place them after the last used macro ID. You can see the list of macros by typing "list".
Result
You have now imported macros from an xml file on an USB stick.
Post-Requisite
If you need to return to your default destination and drive you need to type:

Macros/1 'Global' >cd/

and

[Channel]>sd 1

Task: Import / Using Commandline / Fixture Type from USB

We are going to import a Fixture Type from a USB stick using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a Fixture Type XML or XMLP file. You can download one at the following link: Fixture Share (it's a link to the Fixture Share in ma-share.net). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "library". It would also be a good idea to have a Commandline Feedback window, so you can see the respond from the console.
Context
This will take you through some of the commands used when importing fixture types.
Steps
  1. First we need to point the console in the right direction (the USB stick!). The command we need is called "SelectDrive" and it can be shortened to "SD". In the command line type:
    [Channel]>SD
    The commandline feedback displays a list of the available drives.
  2. We need to select the USB stick (it might be your drive number three). You do this with the "SD" command. For me the USB stick is drive number four. So I type:
    [Channel]>SD 4
    This makes the USB stick the default drive (also for saving shows).
  3. We need to tell the console where we want the fixture type. So we need to enter "Edit Setup" mode and change the directory to the FixtureType (FT) folder. Type:
    [Channel]>cd "Edit Setup"
    and then
    Edit Setup >cd FT
    This will change the directory to the fixture type folder.
  4. If you want to check the stick for fixture type files you can use the command "ListLibrary", it's shortened to "ListL". In the commandline type:
    Edit Setup/FixtureTypes 3 >ListL
    This will display the fixture types xml files on the drive.
  5. The fixture type file on my drive is called "martin@mac_iii_profile@16_bit_extended". The command we need is called "Import". So I type:
    Edit Setup/FixtureTypes 3 >Import martin*
    This will import all the Martin fixture type files from the USB stick and place them in the current show (not the main library in the console). You can see the list of fixture types in the show by typing "list".
Result
You have now imported a fixture type from an xml file on an USB stick to the current show.
Post-Requisite
If you need to return to your default destination and drive you need to type:

Edit Setup/FixtureTypes 3 >cd/

and

[Channel]>sd 1

Task: Import / Using Commandline / Colors from USB

We are going to import colors from a USB stick using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a color XML file. You can download one at the following link: exported LEE colors (it's a link to the Color Share in ma-share.net). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "colors". It would also be a good idea to have a Commandline Feedback window, so you can see the respond from the console.
Context
This will take you through some of the commands used when importing colors.
Steps
  1. First we need to point the console in the right direction (the USB stick!). The command we need is called "SelectDrive" and it can be shortened to "SD". In the command line type:
    [Channel]>SD
    The commandline feedback displays a list of the available drives.
  2. We need to select the USB stick (it might be your drive number three). You do this with the "SD" command. For me the USB stick is drive number three. So I type:
    [Channel]>SD 4
    This makes the USB stick the default drive (also for saving shows).
  3. We need to tell the console where we want the colors. so we need to change the directory to the color folder. Type:
    [Channel]>cd 11
    This will change the directory to the colors folder.
  4. You need to know the name of the xml file you want to import. The file on my drive is called "Lee". And the command we need is called "Import". So I type:
    Colors >Import Lee
    This will import the colors in the xml file, and place them in a ColorPool called Lee after the last used ColorPool ID. You can see the list of ColorPools by typing "list".
Result
You have now imported colors from an xml file on an USB stick.
Post-Requisite
If you need to return to your default destination and drive you need to type:

Colors >cd/

and

[Channel]>sd 1

Topic: Import / Using Graphic User Interface (menus)

When using the GUI you can import Macros, Effects and Fixture Types.

All imports are done from the Setup menu.

Read the following pages for details about each section.

Task: Import / Using Graphic User Interface (menus) / Effects from USB

We are going to import some effects using the windows and menus.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and an effect XML file. You can download one by right-clicking (and select "saving as..") the following link: default effects (it's a link to a XML file with effects - this link doesn't work on the console). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "effects".
Context
This will take you through some of the actions used when importing effects.
Steps
  1. Go to the Setup Show Import/Export Import Effects
    This will open a window like this:

  2. Select the tab with the name of the USB stick (mine is called "NANO")
  3. On the left side you can select the source xml file.
    This will give you the list of effect in the file on the right side.
  4. Here you can (should) select one or several effects using Shift and Ctrl.
    The effects you have selected change the background color from gray to blue.
  5. Choose where you want the effects to be placed (in the effects pool). You can specify a new position (in the green box) or you can change the "Use Earliest / Latest" setting. And you might consider if you want the "Overwrite" on (brown background) or off (black background)
  6. When you are happy with your selection and options you press Import.
Result
You have imported effects into your show.

Task: Import / Using Graphic User Interface (menus) / Macros from USB

We are going to import some macros using the windows and menus.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a macro XML file. You can download one by right-clicking (and select "saving as..") the following link: predefined macros (it's a link to a XML file with macros - this link doesn't work on the console). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "macros".
Context
This will take you through some of the actions used when importing effects.
Steps
  1. Go to the Setup Show Import/Export Import Macros
    This will open a window like this:

  2. Select the tab with the name of the USB stick (mine is called "NANO")
  3. On the left side you can select the source xml file.
    This will give you the list of macros in the file on the right side.
  4. Here you can (should) select one or several macros using Shift and Ctrl.
    The macros you have selected change the background color from gray to blue.
  5. Choose where you want the macros to be placed (in the macro pool). You can specify a new position (in the green box) or you can change the "Use Earliest / Latest" setting. And you might consider if you want the "Overwrite" on (brown background) or off (black background)
  6. When you are happy with your selection and options you press Import.
Result
You have imported macros into your show.

Task: Import / Using Graphic User Interface (menus) / Fixture Types from USB

We are going to import a Fixture Type from a USB stick using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a Fixture Type XML or XMLP file. You can download one at the following link: Fixture Share (it's a link to the Fixture Share in ma-share.net). You need to place this file on a USB stick in the following folder "gma2" and in the subfolder called "library".
Context
This will take you through some of the actions used when importing fixture types to a show.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Show Patch & Fixture Schedule . If you haven't created any layers here, you'll be prompted to create one. You can just cancel this by pressing the yellow X in the upper right corner of the "Layer Name" pop-up. If you are then propted with the "Fixture Wizard", you should also close this using the yellow X.
    You are now in the "Edit Setup".
  2. Press the U1 key or where it says "Fixture Types".
    This opens the Fixture Types window.
  3. Press the X12 key or where it says "Import".
    This will open a new window - the "Select a FixtureType" pop-up.
  4. Here you can use the drop down menu to select the USB stick.
    Now you can see the fixture types on the USB stick.
  5. Select a fixture type and pres Ok.
Result
You have now imported a fixture type into your show. You can patch it or leave the setup as you please.

Topic: Import / Using a FTP connection

It can be usefull to connect to a console using a FTP connection.

There are different files that can be imported to the console using a FTP connection.

For this you need a FTP program. There are many good free FTP program available (like Filezilla).

Please install such a program on a computer connected to your console.

Log in using the IP adress of the console and the username "Data" and the password "Data".

Double click the folder called "actual" and then the "gma2" folder.

Read the following pages for each type of import.

Task: Import / Using a FTP connection / Effects

This task takes you through the steps needed to import an Effects packed using FTP and unpack it in the console using GUI.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and an effect XML file. You can download one by right-clicking (and select "saving as..") the following link: default effects (it's a link to a XML file with effects - this link doesn't work on the console). Save this file on a known location in your computer. Connect you computer to the console using a FTP program (see the "Using FTP" for details).
Context
In some situations it might be useful to upload an Effects packed to the console using FTP. Then you need to unpack it on the console.
Steps
  1. Connect to the console and navigate to the "effects" folder.
  2. Upload the effect xml file.
  3. On the console, go to the Setup Show Import/Export Import Effects
    This will open a window like this:

  4. Select the tab called "Internal".
  5. On the left side you can select the uploaded xml file.
    This will give you the list of the effects in the file on the right side.
  6. Here you can (should) select one or several effects using Shift and Ctrl.
    The effects you have selected change the background color from gray to blue.
  7. Choose where you want the effects to be placed (in the effects pool). You can specify a new position (in the green box) or you can change the "Use Earliest / Latest" setting. And you might consider if you want the "Overwrite" on (brown background) or off (black background)
  8. When you are happy with your selection and options you press Import.
Result
You have uploaded and imported effects into your show.

Task: Import / Using a FTP connection / Macros

This task takes you through the steps needed to import a Macro packed using FTP and unpack it in the console using GUI.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a macro XML file. You can download one by right-clicking (and select "saving as..") the following link: predefined macros (it's a link to a XML file with macros - this link doesn't work on the console). Save this file on a known location in your computer. Connect you computer to the console using a FTP program (see the "Using FTP" for details).
Context
In some situations it might be useful to upload a Macro packed to the console using FTP. Then you need to unpack it on the console.
Steps
  1. Connect to the console and navigate to the "macros" folder.
  2. Upload the macro xml file.
  3. On the console, go to the Setup Show Import/Export Import Macros
    This will open a window like this:

  4. Select the tab named "Internal".
  5. On the left side you can select the source xml file.
    This will give you the list of the macros in the file on the right side.
  6. Here you can (should) select one or several macros using Shift and Ctrl.
    The macros you have selected change the background color from gray to blue.
  7. Choose where you want the macros to be placed (in the macro pool). You can specify a new position (in the green box) or you can change the "Use Earliest / Latest" setting. And you might consider if you want the "Overwrite" on (brown background) or off (black background)
  8. When you are happy with your selection and options you press Import.
Result
You have uploaded and imported macros into your show.

Task: Import / Using a FTP connection / Effects

This task takes you through the steps needed to upload a Fixture Type profile to the library in the console.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show and a Fixture Type XML or XMLP file. You can download one at the following link: Fixture Share (it's a link to the Fixture Share in ma-share.net). Save this file on a known location in your computer. Connect you computer to the console using a FTP program (see the "Using FTP" for details).
Context
It might be useful to upload a fixture type profile to a console using a FTP connection.
Steps
  1. Connect to the console and locate the folder called "library".
  2. Upload your fixture type profile.
Result
You have now uploaded a Fixture Type Profile to the fixture library. This can then be used as any other fixture type profile in the library.

Task: Import / Using a FTP connection / Gobos

This task takes you through the steps needed to upload a gobo picture to the console.
Pre-Requisite
You need a picture in PNG format and 128x128 resolution of your gobo. Connect you computer to the console using a FTP program (see the "Using FTP" for details).
Context
It might be useful to upload a new gobo picture to a console using a FTP connection.
Steps
  1. Connect to the console.
  2. Navigate to the "gobos" folder and into the correct subfolder.
  3. Upload your picture.
Result
You have now uploaded the gobo picture and can use it like any of the gobo pictures in the console.

Task: Import / Using a FTP connection / Bitmaps

This task takes you through the steps needed to upload a bitmap picture to the console.
Pre-Requisite
You need a picture in PNG or BMP format. Connect you computer to the console using a FTP program (see the "Using FTP" for details).
Context
It might be useful to upload a new bitmap picture to a console using a FTP connection. These can be used in bitmap effects.
Steps
  1. Connect to the console.
  2. Navigate to the "bitmaps" folder.
  3. Upload your picture.
Result
You have now uploaded the bitmap and can use it like any of the bitmap effect pictures in the console.

Topic: Export

This section is about exporting Effects, Macro, Fixture Profiles, Colors, Gobos and Bitmaps using different methods.

There are currently three different exporting methods described here: Command line, GUI and FTP connection.

Read the following pages for each method.

Topic: Export / Using Command Line

When using the Command Line you can export a lot of things.

There are one window that makes sense when exporting using the Command line. It's the Command Line. With this you can see how the console reacts to your input.

There's a general rule about exporting. When you export several files and give the exported group of files a name, it creates a single file with that filename. If you don't specify a name, the console will export the files separately with the same filename as the name of the object you are exporting.

Read the following pages for details about each section.

Task: Export / Using Commandline / Effects

We are going to export some effects using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
For this you need a show with some effects. And if you need to take your effects with you, you might want to attach an USB stick. It's also a good idea to have a visible version of the Commandline Feedback window, then you can see the response from the console.
Context
If you use the same effects or just want to carry some general effect with you. You can export effects from a show to an USB stick.
Steps
  1. If you want to export to an USB stick, you need to change the selected drive. The command you use for this is "SelectDrive", it can be shortened to "SD". With this you can see the possible drives by typing:
    [Channel]>SD
    This gives you a list of the possible drives (incl. USB sticks).
  2. I want to export some effects to an USB stick, and in the list I just created, I can see that my USB stick is drive number three, so I type:
    [Channel]>SD 3
    We have selected the USB stick as our default drive. And what we export will be saved on this drive.
  3. So far so good. Now we need a new command "Export". This is used to define what we are exporting and we can give the file a name when we export. We are going to export all effects, but you can limit the export just like when you make normal selections. Type:
    [Channel]>Export Effect 1 thru "ExportedEffects"
Result
That's it. We have exported all the effects and given the packed effect file the name "ExportedEffects".

If you need to change the drive back to the internal drive, you should type:

[Channel]>SD 1

Task: Export / Using Commandline / Macro

We are going to export some macros using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
For this you need a show with some macros. And if you need to take your macros with you, you might want to attach an USB stick. It's also a good idea to have a visible version of the Commandline Feedback window, then you can see the response from the console.
Context
If you use the same macros, have created the ultimate macro (please share) or just want to carry some general macros with you. You can export them from a show to an USB stick.
Steps
  1. If you want to export to an USB stick, you need to change the selected drive. The command you use for this is "SelectDrive", it can be shortened to "SD". With this you can see the possible drives by typing:
    [Channel]>SD
    This gives you a list of the possible drives (incl. USB sticks).
  2. I want to export some macros to an USB stick, and in the list I just created, I can see that my USB stick is drive number three, so I type:
    [Channel]>SD 3
    We have selected the USB stick as our default drive. And what we export will be saved on this drive.
  3. So far so good. Now we need a new command "Export". This is used to define what we are exporting and we can give the file a name when we export. We are going to export all macros, but you can limit the export just like when you make normal selections. Type:
    [Channel]>Export Macro 1 thru "ExportedMacros"
Result
That's it. We have exported all the macros and given the packed effect file the name "ExportedMacros".

If you need to change the drive back to the internal drive, you should type:

[Channel]>SD 1

Task: Export / Using Commandline / Fixture Type

We are going to export some fixture type using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
For this you need a show with some fixture types imported. You can only export fixture types that you have imported from the library into the show. If you need to take your fixture type with you, you might want to attach an USB stick. It's also a good idea to have a visible version of the Commandline Feedback window, then you can see the response from the console.
Context
If you have created or edited a new fixture type profile (please share) or just want to have you favorite profiles with you. You can export them from a show to an USB stick.
Steps
  1. If you want to export to an USB stick, you need to change the selected drive. The command you use for this is "SelectDrive", it can be shortened to "SD". With this you can see the possible drives by typing:
    [Channel]>SD
    This gives you a list of the possible drives (incl. USB sticks).
  2. I want to export some fixture types to an USB stick, and in the list I just created, I can see that my USB stick is drive number three, so I type:
    [Channel]>SD 3
    We have selected the USB stick as our default drive. And what we export will be saved on this drive.
  3. So far so good. Now we need the command "Export". This is used to define what we are exporting and we can give the file a name when we export. We are going to export all fixture types, but you can limit the export just like when you make normal selections. Type:
    [Channel]>Export FT 1 thru
    The "FT" is a shortcut for "FixtureType".
Result
That's it. We have exported all the fixture types from the show. They are created as separate files with correct names.

If you need to change the drive back to the internal drive, you should type:

[Channel]>SD 1

Task: Export / Using Commandline / Colors

We are going to export the colors (gel types) using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
For this you need a show. If you need to take the colors with you, you might want to attach an USB stick. It's also a good idea to have a visible version of the Commandline Feedback window, then you can see the response from the console.
Context
You can export the color gel xml files from a show to an USB stick.
Steps
  1. If you want to export to an USB stick, you need to change the selected drive. The command you use for this is "SelectDrive", it can be shortened to "SD". With this you can see the possible drives by typing:
    [Channel]>SD
    This gives you a list of the possible drives (incl. USB sticks).
  2. I want to export the colors to an USB stick, and in the list I just created, I can see that my USB stick is drive number three, so I type:
    [Channel]>SD 3
    We have selected the USB stick as our default drive. And what we export will be saved on this drive.
  3. So far so good. Now we need the command "Export". This is used to define what we are exporting. We are going to export all fixture types, but you can limit the export just like when you make normal selections. Type:
    [Channel]>Export Color 1 thru
Result
That's it. We have exported all the colors from the show. They are created as separate files with correct names.

If you need to change the drive back to the internal drive, you should type:

[Channel]>SD 1

Topic: Export / Using Graphic User Interface (menus)

When using the GUI you can export Macros, Effects and Fixture Types.

All exports are done from the Setup menu.

Read the following pages for details about each section.

Task: Export / Using Graphic User Interface (menus) / Effects to USB

We are going to export some effects using the windows and menus.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show with some effects. And if you need to take your effects with you, you might want to attach an USB stick.
Context
This will take you through some of the actions used when exporting effects.
Steps
  1. Go to the Setup Show Import/Export Export Effects
    This will open a window like this:

  2. Select the tab with the name of the USB stick (mine is called "NANO")
  3. On the left side you can select the effects. Here you can (should) select one or several effects using Shift and Ctrl.
  4. When you are happy with your selection and options you press Export.
  5. A pop-up will appear to ask you for a name. Type one and finish by pressing Please.
Result
You have exported effects.

Task: Export / Using Graphic User Interface (menus) / Macros to USB

We are going to export some macros using the windows and menus.
Pre-Requisite
You need a show with some macros. And if you need to take your macros with you, you might want to attach an USB stick.
Context
If you use the same macros, have created the ultimate macro (please share) or just want to carry some general macros with you. You can export them from a show to an USB stick.
Steps
  1. Go to the Setup Show Import/Export Export Macros
    This will open a window like this:

  2. Select the tab with the name of the USB stick (mine is called "NANO")
  3. On the left side you can select the macros. Here you can (should) select one or several macros using Shift and Ctrl.
  4. When you are happy with your selection and options you press Export.
  5. A pop-up will appear to ask you for a name. Type one and finish by pressing Please.
Result
You have exported macros.

Task: Export / Using Graphic User Interface (menus) / Fixture Types to USB

We are going to export a Fixture Type to an USB stick using the commandline.
Pre-Requisite
For this you need a show with some fixture types imported. You can only export fixture types that you have imported from the library into the show. If you need to take your fixture type with you, you might want to attach an USB stick.
Context
If you have created or edited a new fixture type profile (please share) or just want to have you favorite profiles with you. You can export them from a show to an USB stick.
Steps
  1. Go to Setup Show Patch & Fixture Schedule .
    You are now in the "Edit Setup".
  2. Press the U1 key or where it says "Fixture Types".
    This opens the Fixture Types window. There should be some fixture here.
  3. Highlight the fixture type you want to export.
  4. Press the X13 key or where it says "Export".
    This will open a new pop-up - the "Choose Destination" pop-up.
  5. Here you can (should) select the USB stick.
Result
You have now exported a fixture type into your USB stick. You can patch it or leave the setup as you please.

Topic: Export / Using a FTP connection

It can be usefull to connect to a console using a FTP connection. There are many things you can get from the console.

There are different files that can be exported (downloaded) from the console using a FTP connection.

For this you need a FTP program. There are many good free FTP program available (like Filezilla). Please install such a program on a computer connected to your console.

Log in using the IP adress of the console and the username "data" and the password "data".

Double click the folder called "actual" and then the "gma2" folder.

Browsing the folders in the console, you can see what you can download.

There are several files to get here:

Bitmap pictures:
They can be found in the "bitmaps" folder.
Colors:
You can download the entire swatchbook in the "colors" folder.
Crash logs:
Generated crash logs can be downloaded from the "temp" folder.
CSV reports:
Generated reports can be downloaded from the "reports" folder.
Effects.
You can download locally (the internal drive) exported effects xml file in the "effects" folder.
Fixture Types:
You can download fixture types from the main library from the "library" folder.
Gobos:
Gobo pictures can be downloaded from the "gobo" folder.
Macros:
You can download locally (the internal drive) exported macro xml file from the "macros" folder.
Screenshots:
Generated screen shots (print screen key) can be downloaded from the "temp" folder.
Shows:
Stored shows can be downloaded from the "shows" folder.

As you can see, there are many things to get out of the console.

Task: Programming

This section contains all the programming tasks.

Task: Setup

This section contains all the show setup tasks.

Task: Software / Programming / Controlling Conventionals

Controlling "dimmer only" lights is the basis of all programming.
Pre-Requisite
For this task you need to have some dimmers patched. It might also be a good idea to have a channel sheet.
Context
We are going to look at different ways to control the "Dim" attribute. Almost everything that lights come out of have a "Dim" attribute. This is usually for controlling the intensity.

Should you type something wrong you can delete the last pressed key (backspace) with the Oops key. Should you have typed something completely wrong, you can press the Esc key to clear the command line. One thing that could also help you in doing this task is the Command Line window.

Read the step results to get more info and tips on the steps.

Steps
  1. Select a channel by pressing the channel number of one of your fixtures followed by Please.
    I have a channel with ID 1, so I press 1 Please.
    The channel number should turn from gray to yellow.
  2. Turn the channel up to 100% by pressing the Full key.
    Below the channel number in the channel sheet might say "Open", "100.00" or something else that indicates that you have turn the channel at full.

    The background of the value ("Open") have changed from blue to dark red. The value text have also changed from gray to red. Theres also a little red marker between the ID number and the value. This means that the value is in the programmer.

  3. Set the value to 25% by pressing At 2 5 Please.
    The value changes but the colors stay.
  4. Press the Clear key once.
    This deselects the channel, but keeps the value. The basic philosophy is that to change a value of something, you need to select it. This also includes selecting what attribute you want to change the value of. In this task we are only looking at the dimmer attribute.
  5. Press the Clear key once more.
    The red background disappeared, the little red marker turned white and the value stayed. The red background and the little red marker indicates that the value will be stored should you choose to store. The marker changed to white to indicate that you still have the value in your programmer, but it will not store the value should you try to store. You can also see the value is still there in a red color.
  6. Press the Clear key again.
    The programmer is empty and we are now back to the beginning.
  7. You can use a combination of the number keys and the - + and Thru keys to create a selection. Make a selection where you use all three keys.
    I press 1 Thru 1 0 - 5 + 1 2 Please.
    This creates a new selection. You can also select channels by pressing on them in the channel sheet.
  8. Press the At key twice.
    This executes a command called "Normal" and it turns your channels at full.
  9. Press the . key twice.
    This executes a command called "Zero" and turns the channels off. Notice that they are still in the programmer and the "closed" value will be store should you choose to do so.
  10. Press Off Channel followed by the number of one of your active channels and Please.
    I got channel 1 active so I press: Off Channel 1 Please.
    This removes all the values assigned to the channel from the programmer.
  11. Your encoder toolbar displays the Preset Types available to you. When you have dimmers you should (at least) have the "Dimmer" button. Press this to make sure you have the Dimmer attribute assigned to the first Attribute Encoder.
    It could look like this:

  12. Turn the encoder to change the value.
    The value should change when the encoder is turned.
  13. Press the encoder shortly.
    This opens the "calculator". Here you have the option to type a new value or choose one of the fast options on the right side of the calculator pop-up.
  14. Press the fast option called "Off".
    This removes any value from the programmer but keeps the channels selected.
  15. You can assign a value range to your selection. Try to select 10 channels that are right next to each other.
    I got ten channels with ID 1 to 10 so I press: 1 Thru 1 0 Please.
    If you are going to assign a value to a selection right after making the selection, you can skip the "Please" in the last example.
  16. Now we can try to assign a range of values type: At 1 0 thru 1 0 0 Please.
    This distributes the value between 10 and 100 evenly between the 10 channels. The selection order is important when you assign a value range. Had you selected the channels in the reverse order (10 thru 1) you would had reversed the value distribution. And selecting your channels in a random order the values would distribute in that order.
  17. Last thing we are going to look at is using the level wheel. If you have a fullsize or a light, you have a level wheel that allows you to adjust the values. Try turning the wheel up and down to see the value change.
Result
We have looked at the most common ways to control an attribute. This is some of the basic operations on the grandMA. You should try all these combinations. The console do a lot of thinking for you in these operations. There are some fast ways and shortcuts in selecting channels/fixtures and assigning values.

Task: Software / Programming / Controlling Moving Lights

Controlling lights with multi attributes is a basic skill in programming.
Pre-Requisite

For this task you need to patch some fixtures. I suggest a fixture that have a gobo wheel, color wheel and CMY color mixing and some focus and zoom options. For this task I use the Mac 700 Profile from Martin.

It might also be a good idea to have a visible Fixture Sheet and a Command Line Window. You should also have a look at the previous page. It gives you a basic understanding of controlling dimmer attributes.

Context

We are going to look at different ways to control the moving light attributes.

There are several ways to control attributes, we are primarily going to use the encoder toolbar and the encoders.

The task is a look at the most common attributes (Pan/Tilt, Gobo, Color, Focus and Zoom). The next tasks takes a detailed look at some of the more special attributes.

Read the step results to get more info and tips on the steps.

Steps
  1. Select a fixture by pressing the fixture number of one of your fixtures followed by Please.
    I have a fixture with ID 1, so I press 1 Please.
    The fixture number and name should turn from gray to yellow.
  2. Let's have a look at Pan and Tilt first. Press where it says "Position" in the Encoder Toolbar.
    The first two encoders should now have control over the Pan and Tilt attributes.
  3. Turn the encoder to move the position of the fixture.
  4. If you have a console, you can use the yellow trackball to position the moving light. You might need to press the Mouse key to assign Pan/Tilt control to the trackball.
  5. Lets have a look at gobos. Select the Gobo button on the Encoder toolbar.
    Note: If you don't have a button called "Gobo" you need to patch a fixture that have gobos.
    This changes the content of the encoder. The First encoder will probably contain the selection of a gobo. If your fixture have gobo indexing or rotation, the second encoder will probably control the gobo rotation.
  6. Try to rotate the encoders to see the changes.
  7. To access the function sets stored in the fixture profile you need to press the encoder. Press the first encoder.
    This opens the calculator.
  8. Next to the onscreen numeric keyboard there are some buttons that allow you to select defined functions (defined by the fixture profile). There might be more than one version of the same symbol. This indicates different modes for the same gobo. Try to select one of them.
    This assigns one of the gobos to the fixture.
  9. Some Fixtures have more than one Gobo wheel. You can change between different Featues (as it's called) by using the Feature selector. Is't located above the first encoder.
    Press the down arrow.
    This present you with a drop down menu with your feature choices.
  10. Close the drop down menu, by pressing the down arrow again.
  11. Now we are goin to have a look at colors. Press the Color button in the encoder toolbar.
    This changes the content of the encoders.
  12. We have looked at the most common ways to control attributes. So have a look at what ColorWheel 1 can offer.
  13. Using the Feature Selector, select "ColorMix".
    Note: If you don't have this feature available, you need to patch a fixture that uses CMY color mixing.
    This gives you control of the Cyan, Magenta and Yellow on the first three encoders. And you can use them to select any blend of color.
  14. The ColorMix also gives us access to the special dialog for colors. Press the "Special Dialog" button on the encoder toolbar.
    This opens the special color dialog on the command screen.
  15. Press the U1 key.
    You have now selected the Fader view in the dialog. Here you can change the color in a more dynamic way. You can use HSB, CMY, RGB or any combination of it..
  16. Press the U2 key.
    Now you see as big color picker. Here you can press on any color to assign it to the fixture.
  17. Press the U3 key.
    This is a catalog of all the color gels from the mayor manufactorers (if you are missing some you can create them and import it - but that's outside the scope of this task.).

    Select a manufacturer and scroll through the colors or use the filter to narrow your selection.

    You can always switch between any of the ways to select colors.
  18. Close the Special Dialog by pressing the "X" in the upper right corner.
  19. The last this we are going to look at in this task is the Focus and Zoom attributes.
  20. In the commandline type this:
    [Channel]>att focus
    Followed by a Please, the attribute is changed to Focus and Zoom. The encoders have also changed to give you control over these two attributes. You can access all of the attributes this way.
  21. Now type this:
    [Channel]>att focus at 50
    Followed by a Please, you can see that the value of 50 is now assigned to the Focus attribute.
  22. Clear your programmer.
Result
We have had a look at the basics of controlling moving lights. In the next tasks we have a look at some details of controlling specific attributes.

Task: Software / Programming / Controlling Shapers

This is a short introduction to controlling shapers using the Special Shaper Dialogs.
Pre-Requisite

For this task you need to patch some fixtures with shapers. For this task I use the VL3500 Spot from Vari*Lite.

It might also be a good idea to have a visible Fixture Sheet and a Commandline Feedback Window. You should also have a look at the previous pages. They give you a basic understanding of controlling general attributes.

For details you should have a look at the window description of the Special Dialog. It gives you a complete description of the dialogs.

Context

The task is a look at controlling the shapers attributes in fixtures.

The grandMA2 series introduces a new and intuitive way to control shapers.

Steps
  1. Select the Shaper preset type in the Encoder Toolbar.
  2. Select the fixture with shapers.
  3. Press the "Special Dialog" button in the Encoder Toolbar.
  4. This dialog has three different modes. Press the U1 key to enter the "Corner Mode".
  5. Press and drag any of the black circles with a orange outline to change the shape of the shapers.
  6. Press and drag the top green circle on the left side of the screen to rotate the entire shaper module.
    If you only have one green circle, then your fixture can't rotate the entire shaper module.
  7. Press the U2 key to switch to the "Blade Mode"
    This gives you a more direct control of the blades.
  8. Press the U3 key to switch to the "Fader Mode".
    This allows you to control the individual parameters using faders.
  9. Clear your programmer.
Result
This was a short task introducing you to the Special Shaper Dialog.

Task: Macro

This section contains all the macro tasks.

Task: Creating / Editing a macro

Macros is a very useful tool. You can do almost anything with macros.
Context
We are now going to make a very simple macro. This macro removes all dimmer values from your programmer.
Steps
  1. Create a macro pool.
  2. Press Edit followed by a empty macro button.
    You should now see the Edit Macro Pop-up (see link below for info about this pop-up)
  3. Right click in the gray area under "Name".
    A small pop-up should appear - allowing you to write text.
  4. Type: Remove Dimmer followed by Please.
    You have now created a new name to the macro.
  5. Press the Add soft-button, to add a command line in the macro.
  6. Now right click in the gray area under "Text". And type: Off att 1 followed by Please.
    The test line in the gray are should now say: Off Attribute 1
  7. Press the big X in the upper right corner of the pop-up to close it.
Result
Your macro is done! Before closing the pop-up you have several extra options: You can add a time to your macro line. Or add more lines. Thus making more sophisticated macros serving your every need.

Task: Using macros

There are many ways to run a macro. This will show you some of them.
Context
The following is not steps to perform. They are different ways to do the same. All the examples are executing macro number 1. If you need to run a different macro just replace the "1" with the correct number. Please read details about the Keywords, Keys and windows by following the link at the bottom.
Steps
  1. There are several ways to execute macro 1:
    • Press the first macro pool button.
    • Use hard keys:Macro1Please.
    • In the commandline type: go ma 1 followed by Please.

Task: Assigning a macro to an Executor.

This will show you different ways to assign a macro to an excutor.
Context
There are also many ways to assign a macro to any executor. This will show you some of them.
Steps
  1. In the following we will assign macro 1 to executor 101
    • Use the hard keys: AssignMacro1AtExec101Please .
    • use the command line: ass m 1 at exec 101Please.
    • A compination af screen and keys: Press Assign then a pool macro button and finally the Executor hard key.
    • Using the Assign Menu (follow the link below for details about the Assign Menu).
Result
Macro 1 is now assigned to executor 101.

Task: Effects Tasks

The following pages will take you through some effect tasks. Demonstrating many of the effect features.
Context
In the following we will make some effects. But to do this we need an appropriate show. If you don't know how to do these steps, please go through the Tutorial Basis 1 and 2.
Steps
  1. Create a new empty show.
    I made a show called "EffectTasks".
  2. Patch 20 moving heads with CMY color mixing.
    I added 20 "Mac 700 Profile Extended" from "Martin".
  3. Place the first 10 of them on a single line 5 meters above the ground facing down. And the last 10 on the ground facing up.
    Fixture 1 thru 10 are moved to X = -10 thru 10; Y = 5; Z = 5; X(rot) = 180. Fixture 11 thru 20 are moved to X = -10 thru 10; Y = 5.
  4. Create a Fixture Sheet and a line with the Effect Pool.Make sure the "Layer Control" is on and it might be an advantage if you turn on "Symbol Features".
  5. Save your show.
Result
We are now ready to make the first effect task. Go to the next page to begin making effects.

Task: Make an Effect using the Programmer.

We will now create an effect using the programmer.
Pre-Requisite
Please make sure you have a appropriate show for this task. You could use the one made on the previous page: Effect task .
Context
We are going to create an effect using the programmer. For this we are using the "Layer Control Bar" buttons that deals with effects:

and the "Encoder Toolbar":

Steps
  1. Select all your fixtures.
  2. Select "Position" preset type in the Encoder Toolbar.
  3. Select "Effect Form" in the "Layer Control bar".
  4. Press the "Pan" encoder and select the "Cos" in the calculator pop-up.
    You will now see all the Pan attribute move from side to side in your fixture sheet.
  5. Press the "Tilt" encoder and select the "Sin" in the calculator.
    Now also the Tilt attribute moves.
  6. Select "Effect Rate" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  7. Press the "Pan" encoder and adjust the rate to "0.5"
  8. Repeat step seven for the "Tilt" attribute.
    It now uses 2 seconds to go through the effect cycle (0.5 hertz).
  9. Select the first half of your fixtures.
  10. Select "Effect Value 1" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  11. Set the "Pan" value to "-30" and the "Tilt" value to "20".
  12. Select "Effect Value 2" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  13. Set the "Pan" value to "30" and the "Tilt" value to "60".
  14. Select "Effect Phase" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  15. Set the value to "0 thru 360" for both "Pan" and "Tilt".
  16. Select the second half of your fixtures.
  17. Select "Effect Value 1" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  18. Set the "Pan" value to "-30" and the "Tilt" value to "-80".
  19. Select "Effect Value 2" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  20. Set the "Pan" value to "30" and the "Tilt" value to "-50".
  21. Select "Effect Phase" in the "Layer Control Bar".
  22. Set the value to "0 thru 360" for both "Pan" and "Tilt".
  23. Press Store and then the first empty effect pool button.
    You have now stored a Pan/Tilt effect with your fixtures.
Result
To test your effect you can clear your programmer and press the effect pool button twice (once for selecting the fixtures - second for assigning the effect to the fixtures), and turn your fixtures on.
Post-Requisite
On the next page we are going to create an effect using the Effect Editor Pop-up.

Task: Make an Effect using the GUI.

We are going to make a dimmer effect using the effect edit pop-up.
Pre-Requisite
You need fixtures that has a "Dim" attribute. But maybe you should make the previous two task first.
Context
We are going to make a random looking dimmer chase that snaps the value at 100% and then ramps down to 0%.
Steps
  1. Select your fixtures in a random order.
  2. Press Edit followed by the first empty effect pool button.
    This gives you the Effect Editor pop-up on screen 1 (or maybe screen 2).
  3. Press the X1 key or where it says "add" to add a line in your effect.
    This gives you the Select Effect Attribute pop-up.
  4. Navigate to the "Dim" attribute and select it.
    This brigs you back to the Effect Editor.
  5. Press the U1 key or where it says "Edit Effect Line".
    What you now get is the Effect Line Editor pop-up. This is great for editing the individual lines in an effect.
  6. Select the PWM table in the first column.
  7. Make sure the Rate is "0.8 Hertz".
  8. Make sure the Value 1 is "0"and Value 2 is "100".
    This makes the effect go from 0% to 100%.
  9. Set the Phase From at "0" and Phase To at "360".
    This distributes all the fixture evenly trough the effect cycle.
  10. Set the Width to "15%". The width controls how many fixtures you have turned on at the same time.
  11. Now we want the dimmer attribute to snap up and ramp down. This is controlled by the "attack" and "decay" parameters. Set the Attack to "0%" and the Decay to "100%".
Result
We are done, and you can close the editor pop-up. All your different settings are automatically store in the effect.
Post-Requisite
You can test your effect by pressing the pool button twice. You might compine it with the effect we made in the previous page. On the next page we are going to look at an effect that uses presets.

Task: Make an Effect with Presets.

We are going to make an effect that changes the color between two different color presets.
Pre-Requisite
For this task you need some fixtures with CMY colors. You need to make two presets with different colors. It might be a good idea to make the previous effect tasks.
Context
There are many advances by using presets and now they can also be used in effects. You can still update your presets without changing every effect that uses it. The effects will simply use the preset content.
Steps
  1. Select all your lights.
  2. Select the "Color Mix" feature in the Encoder Toolbar and select "Effect Value1" in the Fixture Sheet.
  3. Press the preset pool button for your first color preset.
    This assigns the preset to value 1 in your effect.
  4. Select "Effect Value2" in the Fixture Sheet.
  5. Press the preset pool button for the second color preset.
    This assigns the second color preset to the second effect value.
  6. Press Store followed by the first empty effect pool button.
    This stores your two values in an effect.
  7. Right click the Effect pool button or press Edit followed by the effects pool button.
    This opens the Effect Editor pop-up on ether screen 1 or 2.
  8. In the Effect Editor pop-up you'll see the lines for the three different color wheels (CMY). The "Form" is, as a default, "Flat V1". Select all three line in the "Form" column. Right click the selection (or press Edit followed by the selection).
    This gives you a new pop-up.
  9. Select the "Sin" in the Select Form pop-up
    This closes the pop-up and assigns the "Sin" form to your effect.
  10. To avoid all the fixtures change together we need to change the "Phase To" value. Select all the lines in the "Phase To" column and edit the value.
  11. In the Calculator pop-up type "360" followed by Please.
    This spreads out all your fixture evenly in the entire effect cycle.
  12. Close the Effect Editor pop-up.
    We are done.
Result
The effect is done and you can use it by pressing it twice. You might need to turn your lights on and move them to see the effect running.
Post-Requisite
You should save your show. On the next page we are going to assign the effect to executors and use them to control the effects.

Task: Assign and control Effects on Executors.

This is a look at assigning and controlling effects on the executors.
Pre-Requisite
For this task you need at least one effect in your effect pool. Maybe you could benefit from making the previous effects tasks.
Context
There are three ways of running effects: In the programmer, on Executors & from a Sequence. We are now going to take a look at running it from the Executors. And using a speed master to control the overall rate.
Steps
  1. The fastest way to assign an effect to an executor is the Assign key. We are going to assign effect 1 to executor 1. Press Assign Effect 1 At Exec 1 Please.
    This assigns the effect to the executor and you can probably run it by pressing the a Go button and turning up the fader.
  2. Let's check some of the options for this executor.
    1. Press the Assign key and then one of the executor buttons on executor 1.
    2. In the Assign menu (on screen 1 or 2) press where it says "Options".
  3. We are now going to assign the effect to a Speed master. Press where it says "Speed Individual" and in the small pop-up select "Speed Group 1".
  4. Then we need a "Speed Master". This will then control the speed of the effect.
    1. Press the Assign Key followed by an empty executor.
    2. In the Assign Menu press where it says "Function".
    3. Press the X9 key or where it says "Special Master".
    4. Scroll down and select the "Speed 1" option.
    5. Close the Assign Menu.
    You now have a speed master and an effect that uses it.
Result
You now know how to assign en effect to an Effect Executor, and control the rate with a speed master.
Post-Requisite
The next task look at effects in sequences.

Task: Make an Universal Circle Effect

Pre-Requisite
To perform this task you need a showfile with some fixtures with pan & tilt attributes
Context
As the current version does not include any prebuilt effects, and some default-values like rate and size is not optimized, you may want to create some basic universal effect in advance, to use as a starting point for creation of actual effects.
Steps
  1. Edit an empty effect
    Edit Effect 1
    The Effect Editor Window opens
  2. Make sure that you have no fixtures selected and press Add (X11)
    The Attribute Select popup is displayed
  3. Browse to and select Pan from the attribute select popup:
    1. Press the pluss-icon next to the label "Position" to expand this PresetType
    2. Press the pluss-icon next to the label "Position" to expand this Feature
    3. Press the label "Pan" to select this attribute
    The Attribute Select popup is closed, and an effect-line with pan is created
  4. Repeat step 2 & 3, but select "Tilt" as attribute
    The Effect now has two lines, one with Pan and one with Tilt
  5. Rightclick in the Tilt Effect-line of the Form column, and change the form from Sin to Cos
  6. Select both the Pan and Tilt-line of the Rate column, rightclick and change rate to 0.2
  7. Select both the Pan and Tilt-line of the Value1 From column, rightclick and change value to -25
  8. Select both the Pan and Tilt-line of the Value2 From column, rightclick and change value to 25
  9. Press U1 to open Effect-line editor, and enable Relative by pressing X19
  10. Press U2 or U3 to edit the other Effect-line and enable Relative for the secod line aswell
  11. Close the editor with the ESC key or the "X" in the upper right corner
  12. Label the effect by pressing Assign Assign Effect 1Please and enter "Circle" in the label popup
Result
We now have an Universal Circle effect in our Effect-pool, which will be applied relative to the current position To use it, select some fixtures, press the Circle Effect, adjust vsize rate etc if neccesary with the encoders by changing encoders to the respective layers, and either store as a new effect or directly into a cue.

Task: Using effect in a sequence.

We are going to take a look at effects running native in a cue. And use another cue to change a value.
Pre-Requisite
You need some fixtures with a Dimmer and Pan & Tilt feature.
Context
We are going to create an effect in a cue. Then use a second cue to slowly stop the effect.
Steps
  1. Put this in your programmer:
    1. Select all your fixtures.
    2. Select "Position" preset type in the Encoder Toolbar.
    3. Select "Effect Form" in the "Layer Control bar".
    4. Press the "Pan" encoder and select the "Cos" in the calculator pop-up.
    5. Press the "Tilt" encoder and select the "Sin" in the calculator.
    6. Select "Effect Rate" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    7. Press the "Pan" encoder and adjust the rate to "0.5"
    8. Repeat step seven for the "Tilt" attribute.
    9. Select the first half of your fixtures.
    10. Select "Effect Value 1" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    11. Set the "Pan" value to "-30" and the "Tilt" value to "20".
    12. Select "Effect Value 2" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    13. Set the "Pan" value to "30" and the "Tilt" value to "60".
    14. Select "Effect Phase" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    15. Set the value to "0 thru 360" for both "Pan" and "Tilt".
    16. Select the second half of your fixtures.
    17. Select "Effect Value 1" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    18. Set the "Pan" value to "-30" and the "Tilt" value to "-80".
    19. Select "Effect Value 2" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    20. Set the "Pan" value to "30" and the "Tilt" value to "-50".
    21. Select "Effect Phase" in the "Layer Control Bar".
    22. Set the value to "0 thru 360" for both "Pan" and "Tilt".
  2. Turn all your fixture on by setting the dimmer value to 100.
  3. Store this as cue 1 with a fade time of 3 sec. on a empty executor.
  4. Select the executor.
  5. In the commandline type this:
    [Channel]>f 1 t at cue 1
    This selects all the fixtures an takes the values from cue 1 in your programmer.
  6. Change the "Effect Rate" to "0".
    This stops the effect.
  7. Store this as cue 2 with a time of 3 sec.
Result
Now you have an sequence with two cues. Cue 1 will run the effect. Cue 2 will slowly stop the effect. "GoBack" will slowly start the effect again.

Task: Creating a post in the Agenda.

This is an example on how to create an post in the Agenda using the screens and windows (not the commandline).
Context
When you need the desk to execute a command at a specific time you can make an agenda.
Steps
  1. In the agenda window, select a date (could be the current date).
    You should now be in the day view.
  2. Press or click on the "add" button.
    A line like this: should appear.
  3. Now you need to set the start time. Pressing the gray area under "Start" were it says "Absolute" gives you several options. You can select a specific time (called "Absolute") or you can select a relative time (like "Dawn", "Sunrise", "Sunset" or "Dusk"). If you choose an "Absolute" time you also need to enter a time in the gray area under "Time".
  4. You can also set a duration for your agenda post. This tells the desk how long the command is valid. If the desk is off at the start time, the duration tells the desk if the command is still active on the time the desk is turned on.
  5. Repeat is a nice useful feature if you need your command to be repeated. There are all possible repeat possibilities incl. Daily, Every 2nd day, etc.
  6. Now we come to the command part. Here you type the command the desk needs to execute. This can be anything you can type in the command line. If you need more sophisticated commands, you might want to make a macro and then use the agenda to execute the command. You can write a comment in a command. If you write a # symbol then any text after this is not executed or displayed in the command line feedback view. You might need to but your comment in quotes to avoid the console treating your text as keywords (although they will not execute).
  7. In the "Info" column you can type any text that might be useful to you or others.
  8. The gray area under "First" is the beginning date. With this you can see and edit the (first) date the command should execute.
    If you right click the date, you are presented with the "Enter Date Pop-up". Follow link below to read about this pop-up.
  9. If you made a repeating agenda you can set the "last date" the agenda should execute. If you leave the empty, then it repeats forever.
Result
That's it! Now you have made an agenda that executes a command, when you want it. Remember that writing a good info text might help others understand what it does, and why.

Task: Create Highlight Presets

How to create and use Highlight Presets
Context
When Highlight is enabled, a set of predefined values will be forced on output of currently selected fixtures, to enable easy focusing of fixtures. These predefined values are generated by the fixtureType definition. By the use of Highlight Presets, these values may be dynamically changed.

A Normal Preset will apply its values in programmer, while a Highlight Preset will be applied to the Highlight property of your fixture schedule.

Steps
  1. Create (universal) dimmer Preset 1.1 with your channels at 80 %
  2. Create (universal) dimmer Preset 1.2 with your channels at 100%
  3. Clear programmer and type in the commandline Assign Preset 1.1 + 1.2 , press Please and select "Highlight" in the two popups
    Dimmer preset 1 & 2 gets clearly labeled with Highlight
  4. Select Channel 1 thru 10 and enable Highlight
    The channels output normal Highlightvalue 100%
  5. Press Preset 1.1 (80% Highlight)
    Channels 1 thru 10 outputs 80% as highlight
  6. Press Next to subselect channel 1 and press Preset 1.2 (100% Highlight)
    Channel 1 outputs 100% as highlight
  7. Press Set to reselect channel 1 thru 10
    Channel 1 outputs 100% as highlight, channel 2 thru 9 outputs 80% as highlight
Result
You may now use these presets to change the highlightproperty of your current selection.

The current implementation does not support setting of Highlightvalue "None" via these presets. In other words, if you set a Highlightvalue to i.e. Pan by activating a Highlightpreset containing Pan-values, you will need to manualy type Edit Fixture x, and change highlight back to "None" in the popup dialog, for each fixture.

In the predefined Macros you will find macros to change special mode of presets to normal/default/highlight(e.G. "Special Preset Highlight")

Task: Create Default Presets

How to create and use Default Presets
Context
When a fixture has no value from executors or the programmer, the console will output predefined Defaultvalues. These predefined values are generated by the FixtureType definition. By the use of Default Presets, these values may be dynamically changed.

A Normal Preset will apply its values in programmer, while a Default Preset will be applied to the Default property of your fixture schedule.

Steps
  1. Create (universal) dimmer Preset 1.1 with your channels at 50 %
  2. Create (universal) dimmer Preset 1.2 with your channels at 0%
  3. Clear programmer and type in the commandline Assign Preset 1.1 + 1.2 /special=default
    Dimmer preset 1 & 2 gets clearly labeled with Default
  4. Select Channel 1 thru 10
    The channels outputs normal defaultvalue 0%
  5. Press Preset 1.1 (50% Default)
    Channels 1 thru 10 outputs 50% as default
  6. Press Next to subselect channel 1 and press Preset 1.2 (0% Default)
    Channel 1 outputs 0% as default
  7. Press Set to reselect channel 1 thru 10
    Channel 1 outputs 0% as default, channel 2 thru 9 outputs 50% as default
Result
You may now use these presets to change the defaultvalues of your current selection.

In the predefined Macros you will find macros to change special mode of presets to normal/default/highlight

Task: Software / External Connections

These tasks are about external connections

Task: Connecting via Telnet

Telnet access to commandline
Pre-Requisite
To externally access the commandline of the console you need a computer with a Telnet client, connected to the console, with IP-addresses in the same subnet.
Context
In some situation you may find it convenient or necessary to access your console from a remote location.
Steps
  1. Start the Telnet-client on your computer
    Windows XP: press "Start", "Run", type "Telnet" Enter
    A Telnet window opens on your computer
  2. Type "Open [IP-address of console] 30000" and press enter
    Open 192.168.0.4 30000
    A welcome screen with MA-"logo" appears and the grandMA2 commandline prompt.
  3. When finished with remotely accessing your console, type "exit" Enter
    The telnet-client gets disconnected from your console and its window may be closed.

Task: Software / External Connections / Getting a Crash Log from the console

If the console should crash, then it creates a log of events. This file can be very helpful for the MA software team.
Context
Should you be so unlucky to experience a crash, then the console creates a log of events that led to this. If you send this log to your distributer it will end in the hands of the software team at MA. This will help them making sure the bug is fixed.
Steps
  1. Install a FTP program like Filezilla (http://filezilla-project.org) on a computer.
  2. Connect the computer to the same network as your console. Make sure your use a valid IP address.
  3. Make sure the console is on.
  4. Connect to the console using the FTP program by typing the IP address of the console. The user name is: Data and the password is: Data.
  5. Navigate to the "temp" folder in the console and open it.
  6. The crashlog is a text file in a format like this: V[version number]_CRASH-[date] [time]. Download the file to your computer on a known location.
Result
You now got the crashlog. You should e-mail this to your distributor with an explanation of your actions before the crash. You can close the FTP program.

Topic: NPU Software tasks.

This is a selection of software tasks for the NPU.

This is currently organized in series 1 and 2 mode. There's also one topic about updating the software. It outside the series 1 and 2 modes since it applies to both modes.

Topic: Software / NPU / Series 1

This section is a collection of software task for the NPU running in series 1 mode.

This section is about using th NPU with a grandMA series 1 system.

Task: Software / NPU / Starting the NPU in series 1mode.

This task takes you through the steps of starting the grandMA NPU in series 1mode.
Pre-Requisite
It's important that you have a USB keyboard connected when you are changing the mode!
Context
You might need to change the mode of the NPU. It can run in series 1 or series 2 mode. We are going to have a look at booting it in series 1 mode.
Steps
  1. Make sure the power is connected.
  2. Turn on the NPU
    The NPU starts to boot up.
  3. At some point the screen will display this screen:
  4. Make sure you interrupt the automatic boot by using the arrow keys on a keyboard to select the second line. It reads: NPU [Series1 Version] (compatibility Mode). Press "Enter" on the keyboard to confirm.
Result
The boot process continues. If you don't interrupt the NPU in the boot process, it will start in the mode it was last used.

Task: Software / NPU / Setting the IP address in series 1 mode.

This task is about setting the IP address when in series 1 mode in a grandMA NPU.
Pre-Requisite

You need a NPU with power on and booted in series 1 mode. And you need to have a USB keyboard connected.

Context

When the NPU is booted in series 1 mode it works a bit differently. This task takes you through the steps needed to change the IP address when in series 1 mode.

Steps
  1. Use the arrow keys on the keyboard to navigate to the IP address Config section.
  2. Press the "tap" key until the small marker is under one of the four numbers you wish to change. Use the "Up" and "Down" keys to change the number.
  3. Press "Enter" key to confirm your choice. Press "Esc" key to abort the change.
Result
If you have made a change and pressed the "Enter" key, the NPU will reboot and give you a screen like this:

When it's done rebooting, you'll have a new IP address.

Task: Software / NPU / Add in series 1 session.

This task will add a NPU in a series 1 session.
Pre-Requisite
You need to have a NPU booted in series 1 mode, with the same software version (as the rest of the system) and with a valid IP address connected to your MA system.
Context
This is a little of topic (being most on how to operate the grandMA series 1). But it's all about NPU ;-) The grandMA NPU's add 4,096 parameters, DMX output and processing power to a grandMA system.
Steps
  1. On the console, you should go to Tools MA Network Configuration NSP . In series 1 mode the NPU works as an extended grandMA NSP.
    It could look like this:

  2. Press the "Add new NSP" screen button.
    This opens this pop-up:

  3. Select the NPU in the pop-up
    This should give you a show upload to the NPU. And the screen changes to something like this:

  4. Close the menu by pressing the "Tools" hardkey.
Result
You have added a NPU as a 8 port NSP in your session. You can see that the left top corner of the NPU display have changed from something like this:

To something like this:

Topic: Software / NPU / Series 2

This section is a collection of software task for the NPU running in series 2 mode.

This section contains the following tasks.

Task: Software / NPU / Starting the NPU in series 2 mode.

This task takes you through the steps of starting the grandMA NPU in series 2 mode.
Pre-Requisite
It's important that you have a USB keyboard connected when you are changing the mode!
Context
You might need to change the mode of the NPU. It can run in series 1 or series 2 mode. We are going to have a look at booting it in series 2 mode.
Steps
  1. Make sure the power is connected.
  2. Turn on the NPU
    The NPU starts to boot up.
  3. At some point the screen will display this screen:
  4. Make sure you interrupt the automatic boot by using the arrow keys on a keyboard to select the top line. It reads: NPU [Series2 Version]. Press "Enter" on the keyboard to confirm.
Result
The boot process continues. If you don't interrupt the NPU in the boot process, it will start in the mode it was last used.

Task: Software / NPU / Changing the name in Series 2 mode.

This task focuses on changing the name of a grandMA NPU, when in series 2 mode.
Pre-Requisite
You need to have booted the grandMA NPU in Series 2 mode.
Context
For better NPU management, you can change the name of the unit.
Steps
  1. Press the "Setup" button in the lower right corner of the touch screen.
    This opens a pop-up called NPU Setup. It looks like this:

  2. Press the "Edit Host Name" screen button.
    This opens a Enter Host Name pop-up:

  3. Type a new name. You can open an on-screen keyboard by pressing the "+" in the upper left corner of the name pop-up. Confirm with "Please" (on-screen keyboard) / "Enter" (external keyboard).
    This gives you a new pop-up:

  4. You need to reboot the NPU before the name change takes affect. Press "Yes" to reboot immediately or press "No" to reboot later.
Result
This changes the NPU name, after a reboot.

Task: Software / NPU / Setting the IP address in Series 2 mode.

This task focuses on setting the IP address when in series 2 mode.
Pre-Requisite
You need to have booted the grandMA NPU in Series 2 mode.
Context
To connect the NPU to your series 2 system, you need to set a proper IP address.
Steps
  1. Press the "Setup" button in the lower right side of the touch screen.
    This opens a pop-up called NPU Setup. It looks like this:

  2. Press the "Edit IP" screen button.
    This opens the Set IP Address pop-up:

  3. Type a new IP address. Confirm with "Please".
    This gives you a pop-up asking you, if you want to reboot:

  4. For the new address to take affect, you need to reboot. But you have the option to do it later. Pressing "Yes" reboots the NPU imediately.
Result
This sets a new IP address, when the NPU have completed a reboot.

Task: Software / NPU / Add in series 2 session.

This task will add a NPU in a series 2 session.
Pre-Requisite
It's very important to know that, if a NPU is set to be a member of several sessions in a network, It will connect to the session that reaches the NPU first!! If that session is then closed - Then the NPU will connect to the next session it finds on the network, possibly creating a very different DMX output!
You need to have a NPU booted in series 2 mode, with the same software version and with a valid IP address connected to your MA system.
Context
The grandMA NPU's add parameters, DMX output and processing power to a grandMA system.
Steps
  1. On the console, you should go to Setup MA Network Configuration NPU Network Processing Unit
    It could look like this:

  2. Press the "Add" button or the X1 key or right-click (with the mouse) where it says "New".
    This opens the Select Station pop-up:

  3. Select the NPU in the pop-up. If it's not there - something is wrong with the connection (it can see NPU's with a wrong IP address).
    After this your NPU Configuration should look something like this:

  4. Make sure there's a "yes" in the "session member" column. If there isn't you need to add it by pressing the cell followed by pressing the encoder (or right clicking the cell with the mouse).
    This should make a show upload, and the line of the NPU should change to a green color.

    You can also see on the NPU that it's now a part of the session. The screen changes from something like this:

    to something like this:

Result
The background color in the NPU line should turn green to indicate that the NPU is active in the session:

It's very important to know that, if a NPU is set to be a member of several sessions in a network, It will connect to the session that reaches the NPU first!! If that session is then closed - Then the NPU will connect to the next session, possibly creating a very different output!

Task: Software / NPU / Calibrating the touch screen.

In this task we calibrate the touch screen in a grandMA NPU, when in series 2 mode.
Pre-Requisite
You need to have booted the grandMA NPU in Series 2 mode.
Context
If the grandMA NPU isn't precise in the touch screen, you can re calibrate the screen.
Steps
  1. Press the "Setup" button in the lower right corner of the touch screen (or use an USB mouse).
    This opens a pop-up called NPU Setup. It looks like this:

  2. Press the "Calibrate Screen" screen button (or use the mouse again).
    This opens a calibrate screen. It looks like this:

  3. Touch each if the blinking corners in turn.
    This recalibrate the touch screen.
  4. Close the NPU Setup pop-up using the "X" in the upper right corner.
Result
You have re calibrated the screen.

Task: Software / NPU / Change port configuration in series 2 mode.

This task will have a look at changing the port configuration of a NPU in series 2 mode.
Pre-Requisite
You need to have a NPU booted in series 2 mode, with the same software version (as the rest of the system), with a valid IP address connected to your MA system and running in a session.
Context
The grandMA NPU have 8 DMX ports on the back of the unit. They can be configured as output or input.
Steps
  1. On the console, you should go to Setup MA Network Configuration NPU Network Processing Unit
    It could look like this:

  2. Here you can see the NPU and the port configuration. Edit one of the ports by marking a cell and pressing the encoder or right clicking it with the mouse.
    This opens the Configure DMX port pop-up:

  3. Set if the port should be an "Output", "Input" or "Off" using the drop down box.
  4. Set the DMX universe the port should output or input.
  5. Confirm you settings by pressing "Please".
    This closes the pop-up.
Result
You have now changed the port setting. If you are happy, you can close the setup menu. On the NPU you can see the configuration of the DMX ports. It could look like this:

The letter is the same as the port markings on the back of the NPU. The number is the assigned DMX universe. The line indicates the port status. Green is "Output", Yellow is "Input" and Grey is "Off".

Task: Software / NPU / Updating the software.

This task takes you through the steps needed to update the NPU software.
Pre-Requisite

To perform this task you need to have a bootable USB stick with the new software version (installed using StickMAker). It uses the same software as the console. You also need an USB keyboard connected to your NPU.

StickMaker & Console image Download Page (MA website)

Steps
  1. Plug the USB stick to any of the USB plug on the NPU.
  2. Reboot or turn on the NPU.
    At some point in the boot process you get to a screen like this:

  3. When you see a screen like the one above, you need to press the "Esc" key in the keyboard to enter the Boot Menu.
    This give you a new screen:

  4. In the new screen you can use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to select the USB stick. In the picture above the stick is called "Alcor Flash Disk". Confirm your choice using "Enter".
    After a little more booting. you are presented with a new screen:

  5. Select the "MA-Installer".
    After a while you are presented with a new screen:

  6. Confirm you want to install the version on the USB stick by pressing "Enter".
    The NPU installs the new software. When it's done you are prompted with a new pop-up:

  7. Remove the stick from the NPU, and press the "Enter" key again.
Result
And you are done. The NPU reboots with the new software.

Concept: Reference

This section contains property-description of each elements of the console.

For conceptual understanding of the console and step-by-step instructions, please read the Concepts and Tasks sections.

Concept: Commandline

This section contains syntax-rules and descriptions of all keywords

Reference: Commandline Syntax

How to combine keywords into valid commandline expressions

General rules

The general rules for the commandline are:

  • Basic syntax: [Function] [Object] .
  • All objects have its default function, which is used if no function is given
  • Most functions have its default object or object-type, which is used if no object is given

  • Objects are arranged in hierarchical tree-structures
  • If object does not support the applied function, the function will be passed on to its child or parent object

Terminology

[Square Brackets]
Description of something to be entered that is not the literal text
(Parentheses)
Description of somthing that is optional
"Quotes"
A name (plain text) to be entered, end-qoute may be omitted if end of line, both quotes may be omitted if name is not a keyword and does not contain special characters or space
Capitalization
The console does not distinguish between upper/lower case in keywords, this form is used merely to improve readability

Reference: Functions

A function is an action you want the console to perform

Syntax

[Function]

[Function] [helping keyword]

[Function] [Object]

[Function] [Object-list]

[Function] [Object-type]

[Function] [Object-type] [ID]

[Function] [ID]

Some functions are global and does not take any arguments, however most functions are applied to an object, which proceeds the function in the commandline.

  • If no Object-type is given, and destination is root, the default Object-type of the function is used.
  • If no Object-type is given, Object-types at current destination us used.
  • If no ID is given, any current/active ID of the resolved Object-type is used
  • If no current/active ID exists of the resolved Object-type, the next available ID is used

Example:

[Channel]>Blackout
no object needed for global functions
[Channel]>Delete Group 1 Thru 4 - 3 +6
Deletes the Object-list Group 1,2,4,6
[Channel]>Select Executor 1
Selects the first Executor
Users> Store
Creates a new user

Reference: Objects

Objects are items in your showfile which functions are applied to

Syntax

[Object]

[Object-type] [ID]

[Object-type] "name"

[ID]

Some objects are unique, and does not have an ID, (e.g. Default), however most object are of a specific Object-type which contain multiple objects, and the actual object is referred with Object-type ID, (e.g. Fixture 5)

Some object-types are non-exclusive, and may exist in multiple instances, e.g. Cue 1 could refer to Cue 1 of Sequence 1, or Cue 1 of Sequence 2. To refer to Cue 1 of Sequence 2, both Cue 1 Sequence 2 , and Sequence 2 Cue 1 is valid

Unless you are creating new Objects (with the Store-function) you may reference objects by using their name, rather than their number, as ID. If the name contains keywords or space, it needs to be enclosed in quotes.

All Objects have a default function which is used if no function is given. This means that even if the general syntax is [Function][Object], just using [Object] is totally valid.

Example:

[Channel]> Full
The Full object is unique and has no ID. Default function for Full is At, so this syntax would set the current selection to 100%
[Channel]>Group 3
The group object-type has multiple instances, and default function SelFix (select fixtures in object), so this syntax will select channels and fixtures in group number 3
[Fixture]> 31
The current default object-type of the commandline is Fixture, so 31 would refer to the object Fixture 31. As the default function for Fixture is SelFix, this syntax would select fixture 31

Reference: Object-list syntax

An object-list is a list of objects of same type

Syntax

[Object-type1] [ID1]

[Object-type1] [ID1] [Object-type1] [ID2]

[Object-type1] [ID1]+[ID2]

[Object-type1] [ID1] Thru [ID2] - [ID3]

[Object-type1] [ID1] Thru

[Object-type1] Thru [ID1]

[Object-type1] Thru

[Object-type1] "Name"

[Object-type1] "Nam*"

  • If no object-types is given, the list is built with the items of your current destination.
  • If no object-types is given and current destination is root (no destination), the list is built with the default object-type for the applied function.
  • If no object-type is given and no function is applied, the list is built with the current default object-type of the commandline.

Example:

[Channel]>Fixture 3 Thru 6
Selects Fixture 3 thru 6 (3, 4, 5 & 6)
[Channel]>Fixture Thru 3
Selects Fixture 1, 2, and 3
[Channel]>Delete 3 Thru
Deletes cue 3 and above
[Channel]>ChannelThru
Selects all channels
[Channel]>Channel1Channel5
Selects channels 1 and 5
[Channel]>Fixturemac*
Selects all fixtures with name starting with mac

Reference: Selection-list syntax

A Selection-list is a list of fixtures (Channel and Fixture objects)

Syntax

[Object]

[Object-type1] [ID1]

[Object-type1] [ID1] + [Object-type2] [ID2]

[Object-type1] [ID1] Thru [Object-type2] [ID2]

[Object-type1] [ID1] Thru [Object-type2] [ID2] - [Object-type3][ID3]

[Object-type1] [ID1] Thru

[Object-type1] Thru [ID1]

[Object-type1] Thru

[Object-type1] "Name"

[Object-type1] "Nam*"

With a selection-list (as opposed to an object-list) each object-type is resolved into its corresponding fixture-objects, which is then used to build the list.

  • If object-type is missing, the last entered object-type is used.
  • If no object-type is given at all, the current default object-type of the commandline is used.
  • If no ID is given before/after a Thru-statement, the first/last available id is used
  • If no ID is given for an Object-type the current/active or next available is used, depending on function applied
  • If object-type reference is non-exclusive, necessary parent-objects are resolved by user-defaults and currently selected/active objects.

Example:

[Channel]>Fixture 3 + Channel 6
Selects Fixture 3 and Channel 6
[Channel]>CueThru 3 - Channel 4
Selects Fixtures in first 3 cues, but not channel 4
[Channel]>Group 3 + Cue 4
Selects fixtures in group 4 and fixtures in cue 3

Reference: Executor-list syntax

An Executor-list is an object-list of Executors

Syntax

Executor [list]

Page [list]

FaderPage [list]

ButtonPage [list]

An executor-list has same syntax as object-lists, but are resolved into Executor-objects when building the list

Example:

[Channel]>Pause Page 1 Thru 3
Pauses Executors on page 1,2 and 3
[Channel]>Delete Executor10 Thru 13
Deletes Executors 10 thru 13 of current page

Reference: Attribute-list syntax

An Attribute-list is an object-list of Attributes

Syntax

Attribute [list]

Feature [list]

PresetType [list]

An attribute-list has same syntax as object-lists, but are resolved into Attribute-objects when building the list

Example:

[Channel]>On Feature gobo1
Activates attributes in feature gobo1
[Channel]>Off Attribute8.1.1 Thru 4
Knocks the first 4 Shaperattributes out of programmer

Reference: Station-list Syntax

Syntax

[IP-address]

[IP-address] Thru [IP-address]

[Host-ID]

[Host-ID] Thru [Host-ID]

IP-address is a 32-bit number, written in a dot-decimal notation.(four numbers, each ranging from 0 to 255, separated by dots, e.g. 192.168.0.101).

Host-ID is the unique part of the IP-address within a Network, - usually the last decimal (e.g the IP-address 192.168.0.101 has the Host-ID 101 and Network-ID 192.168.0)

If start or end of the Thru command is missing, first/last occurrence will be used.

Concept: Keywords

Keywords are reserved words used with the commandline

This section is divided into four different sections. There's a page with all function keywords, a page with all Object Keywords and a page with all helping keywords. Then theres the section with all keywords in the grandMA2 section.

Most pages contains description of the keywords with examples of use.

Concept: Function Keywords

This is a list of the function keywords.

Functional Keywords are used in the commandline to perform a task or function. Examples of functional keywords could be Goto, Delete, LeaveSession. Functional keywords are often followed by an object, that the function/task should be applied to: Goto Cue 3, Delete Preset "Blue". Some functions are global and does not need an object as argument, e.g. Blackout.

Functional keywords may be compared to verbs in human languages.

Concept: Object Keywords

This is a list of object keywords.

Object Keywords are used in the commandline to reference objects in your showfile. Examples of object keywords could be Channel, Fixture, Effect, Preset. These keywords represent object-types, and are typically used together with a number/ID or a name/label, to point to specific objects: Channel 3, Fixture 10, Effect 4, Preset "Red".

Object keywords may be compared to nouns in human languages.

Concept: Helping Keywords

This is a list of the helping keywords.

Helping Keywords are used in the commandline to give relations to functions and objects. Examples of helping keywords could be At, Thru : Copy Cue 3 At Cue 5, Delete Effect 4 Thru 6.

Helping keywords may be compared to prepositions and conjunctions in human languages

Concept: This is a list of all Keywords

Reference: * Asterisk Character

The asterisk character is used to insert a wildcard into a string, when referring to names

Example:

[Channel]>Group Mac*
Selects fixtures in all groups with name starting with "mac"
[Channel]>Fixture backt*blue
Selects fixtures with name starting with "backt" and ending with "blue"

Reference: @ At-sign

The @-sign is used to create a non-executing macro-line. The sign may be inserted in the beginning and/or end of a macro-line

Example:

Attribute pan At @
macro-line will wait for user to append data and press please
@ Fade 20
macro-line will append itself to current commandline and then execute
@ Part @
macro-line will append itself to current commandline and then wait for user to append more data and press please

Reference: $ Dollar-sign

Dollarsign is used to identify variables.

$ is a character used to identify variables. Variables are containers that may hold text or values, When a commandline is executed, these variables will be replaces with its content.
use quotes around the variablename when using varables and their content needs to be enclosed in quotes, e.g. names with spaces

Example:

SetVar $mychasers = "Executor 11 Thru 15"
Sets the variable $mychasers
Off $mychasers
Turns Off Executor 11 Thru 15
SetVar $myname = "Ben Dover"
Sets the variable $myname
Login $"myname"
Logs in "Ben Dover"

Reference: ( ) Parentheses

Popup-dialogs in macros

Parantheses, round brackets are used to create a popup dialog in a macro, to collect userinput. The user will be prompted with the text inside the round brackets, and a text-input field. Unless the user cancels the popup, the macro-line will be executed with the user-input replacing the brackets and text inside

Example:

Store Cue ("Please enter Cue-number to store")
A popup asks for cuenumber, then stores the cue
Interleave 1.("how many to Interleave? odd/even=2 etc")
A popup asks for how many interleaved parts, then subselects first part

Reference: [ ] Square Brackets

Conditional expressions

The square brackets are used in macros, to set a conditional expression which must resolve to "True", for the following commands to be executed. The expression takes userdefined variables and logical operators.

a==b
a equals b
a>b
a greater than b
a<b
a less than b
a<=b
a less than or equal b
a>=b
a greater than or equal b

The two arguments a and b are not compared as numbers, but as text-strings, character by character, e.g. "61" is considered to be greater than "599", as 6 is larger than 5.

Example:

[$myvar==5]Off Page3
Page 3 is turned Off, only if $myvar equals 5
Goto Cue [$var<5] 1 [$var>=5] 35
Goto Cue 1 if $var is less than 5, Goto Cue 35 if $var is larger or equal 5

Reference: . Dot Character

The dot character is used as a delimiter to enter numbers with decimal fractions and to enter hierarchical object IDs. The dot is also used together with the function CD to change destination one level up.

Example:

[Channel]>Off Attribute 3.2.3
Kicks the attribute Gobo2-Mode out of the programmer, for current selection
[Channel]>Attribute panAt 50.5
Sets pan to 50.5 degrees
Edit Setup/Universes>CD ..
Exits one level up in the tree-structure:
Edit Setup>

Reference: ; Semicolon Character

The Semicolon character is used as a delimiter to enter multiple commands in one line.

There has to be a space between the semicolon and the following command.

Example:

[Channel]>Off Executor 5 ;Delete Group 3
Turns off executor 5 and deletes group 3

Reference: / Slash Character

Syntax

[Functional keyword] /?

Assign [object-list] /property=value

[commandline-syntax] /option1 /option2 /option3=value

The Slash character is used as a delimiter to enter object-properties or function options. The slash is also used together with the function CD to change destination to root level.

Example:

[Channel]>Copy /?
Displays valid options for the function Copy
[Channel]>Assign Cue 5 /mib=early /trig=follow
Changes properties for Cue 5
[Channel]>Store Cue50 /remove /cueonly
Over-rides the current storeoptions
Edit Setup/Universes>CD /
Exits to the rootlevel in the tree-structure:
[Channel]>

Reference: " " Quotes

Quotes are uses to indicate a text-string

Syntax

"text with spaces"

"ReservedWord"

If you are to enter text-string into the command-line, which is a reserved word, the short-notation of a reserved word, or a text containing spaces, you need to embrace the text in quotes.

Example:

[Channel]> Label Macro 3 "on"
"on" is a reserved word (keyword) so it needs to be embraced in quotes to be used as a label
[Channel]> Assign Cue 1 /info="run after music stops"
the info-text contains spaces, so it needs to be embraced in quotes

Reference: + (plus) Keyword

+ is a helping keyword with multiple functions

Syntax

+ is used to combine multiple objects into a list, or to indicate a relative value. When used as a relative indicator, with no value given, the value of 1 will be used.

If used as a starting keyword, + will create a Selection-list, which will be added to the current selection.

Example:

[Channel]>DeleteCue 1 + 2
Deletes cue 1 and 2
[Channel]>At+ 5
Adds 5% to the actual dimmervalue
[Channel]>+ 5 Thru 7
Adds channel 5, 6 and 7 to the current selection
[Channel]>Page+
Same as Page +1, calls next page

Reference: - (minus) Keyword

- is a helping keyword with multiple functions

Syntax

- is used to remove objects from a list, or to indicate a relative negative value. When used as a relative indicator, with no value given, the value of 1 will be used.

If used as a starting keyword, - will create a Selection-list, which is removed from the current selection.

Example:

[Channel]>Group 5 -Channel 2
Selects group 5 but not channel 2
[Channel]> At- 10
Substracts 10% from the current dimmervalue
[Channel]>- 5 Thru 7
Removes channel 5, 6 and 7 from the current selection
[Channel]>Page-
Same as Page -1, calls previous page

Reference: >>> (Skip+) Keyword

>>> is a function used to jump fast to the next step (by default without timing)

Syntax

>>> [Executor-list]

>>> [Timecode-list]

the time used by this function may be adjusted via the GoFast property found under Setup Show Playback + MIB Timing

Example:

[Channel]>>>> Executor 5
Jumps to next cue on executor 5

Reference: <<< (Skip-) Keyword

<<< is a function used to jump fast to previous step (defalt without timing)

Syntax

<<< [Executor-list]

<<< [Timecode-list]

the time used by this function may be adjusted via the GoFast property found under Setup Show Playback + MIB Timing

Example:

[Channel]><<< Executor 3
Jumps to previous cue on executor 3

Reference: Agenda Keyword

Agenda is an object-type that holds scheduled tasks to be executed at specific dates and times

Syntax

Agenda [ID]

Example:

Reference: Align Keyword

Align is a function used to change the mode of the attribute-encoders

Syntax

Align [mode]

Align Off

The mode may be called by its name, or index (1-4, 0=Off).

  1. "<"
  2. ">"
  3. "><"
  4. "<>"

When activating an Align-mode, the encoders will no longer adjust the whole selection equally, but adjust proportionally according to selection-order, either most at the last, most at the first, most at the last&first(inverted), or most at the center of the selection.

Example:

[Channel]>Align "<"
Sets the encoders to first Align-mode.
[Channel]>Align 0
Turns off any Align-mode

Reference: AlignFaderModules Keyword

AlignFaderModules is a function used configure connected external wings to fit your consoletype

Syntax

AlignFaderModules

Which executors the wings controls is not freely adjustable by the user. Wings are fader-extensions and are intended to follow after the faders inbuilt in the console.

On the Light and Ultralight which have 15 inbuilt faders, a connected wing will control executor 16-30.

On a fullsize which have inbuildt 30 faders, a connected wing will control executor 31-45.

On a Replay Unit which doesn't have any inbuilt fader, a connected wing will control executor 1-15.

Which executors the wing controls is stored inside the wing. If you take a wing normally used with a fullsize and connect to a Light, or vice versa if you connect a Wing normallly used by a Light, to a fullsize, you will experience either an overlap or gap in the executor numbering. To fix this you can run the AlignFaderModules command to readdress the wings to fit the current consoletype. When running this command , all connected wings will be readdressed to remove any gaps and/or overlaps.

Reference: All Keyword

All is a function used to reset the Matricks property Single x

Syntax

All

All is a function used to set the Matricks property Single x to none, which means to reselect all fixtures, (or reselect all columns of fixtures, if Interleave is active)

Example:

[Channel]> All
reselects all fixtures/columns

Reference: AllButtonExecutors Keyword

AllButtonExecutors is an alias for all Button-Executors

Syntax

[function] AllButtonExecutors

AllButtonExecutors may be used as an alias to address Executor 101 and upwards, on all pages

Example:

[Channel]>Off AllButtonExecutors
turns off all Button-Executors

Reference: AllChaseExecutors Keyword

AllChaseExecutors is an alias for all Executors with chasers assigned

Syntax

[function] AllChaseExecutors

AllChaseExecutors may be used as an alias to address all Executors with chasers assigned

Example:

[Channel]>Off AllChaseExecutors
turns off all Executors with chasers

Reference: AllFaderExecutors Keyword

AllFaderExecutors is an alias for all Fader-Executors

Syntax

[function] AllFaderExecutors

AllFaderExecutors may be used as an alias to address Executors 1 thru 90 on all pages

Example:

[Channel]>Off AllFaderExecutors
turns off all Fader-Executors

Reference: AllRows Keyword

AllRows is a function used to reset the Matricks property Single y

Syntax

AllRows

AllRows is a function used to set the Matricks property Single y to none, which means to reselect all rows of fixtures in a virtual array created with MatricksInterleave

Example:

[Channel]> AllRows
reselects all rows of fixtures in an interleave array

Reference: AllSequExecutors Keyword

AllSequExecutors is an alias for all Executors with sequences assigned

Syntax

[function] AllSequExecutors

AllSequExecutors may be used as an alias to address all Executors with sequences assigned

Example:

[Channel]>Off AllSequExecutors
turns off all Executors with sequences

Reference: Assign Keyword

Assign is a function used to define relationships between objects or give values to properties

Syntax

Assign [Object-list 1] (At) [Object-list 2]

Assign [Function] (At) [Object-list]

Assign [Helping-keyword] [Value-list] [Object-list]

Assign [Object-list] /[property1]=[value] /[property2]=[value]

Assign [Object]

If no object-type is given for the object-list, the objects at the current destination is used. If the current destination is root (no destination) the current default object-type of the commandline is used.
Assign is the only function that may be directly proceeded by another function

Example:

[Channel]>Assign Dmx 2.101 At Channel 5
Patches DMX address 101 on the second universe to channel 5
Sequences/Global>Assign1Thru 5 At Executor6Thru 10
Assigns Sequence 1 thru 5 to Executor 6 thru 10
[Channel]>Assign Toggle At Executor101
Assigns a toggle-button to Executor 101
[Channel]>Assign Fade 3 Cue 5
Assigns a fade-time of 3 seconds to cue 5
[Channel]>Assign User JohnDoe /password=qwerty
Sets the password for JohnDoe to "qwerty"
[Channel]>Assign Executor 1
Opens the Assign Menu dialog for executor 1

Reference: At Keyword

At may be used as a function to apply values, or as a helping keyword for other functions, to indicate destinations

Syntax

At [Value-list]

At [Value-type] [Value-list]

At [Object-list]

[Object-list] At [Value-list]

[Object-list] At [Value-type] [Value-list]

[Object-list] At [Object-list]

[Function] [Object-list] At [Object-list] (as helping keyword)

At is the exception "that proves the rule". At is one of the few functional keyword that accepts objects before the function.

As a starting keyword, At is a function that applies values in the programmer, to the current selection.

If value-type Fade or Delay is used, the value-list will be applied as individual fade/delay-times

Following an object-list, At is a function that applies values to the object-list. If the object-list does not support the At function, the object-list is resolved into a Selection-list which gets selected and At applies values in programmer

Following an object-list that follows a function, At is a helping keyword for the starting function

When At applies a range/list, the values/objects are usually spread across the receiving objects. e.g. Fixture 1 Thru 3 At 0 Thru 100 will set 1 At 0, 2 At 50, and 3 At 100. There is however one exception from this rule: If the applied range is a list of cues from a tracking sequence, all fixtures will be set to all cues. This enables you with the At function to apply the tracking status of a cue (At Cue Thru x)

Example:

[Channel]>At 75
Sets the dimmer attributes of current selection to 75%
[Channel]>At Cue 3
Sets the current selection to the values of Cue 3
[Channel]>Fixture 2 At Fixture 3
Selects Fixture 2 and sets it to the values of Fixture 3
[Channel]>Executor 3 At 50
Sets the fader of Executor 3 to 50%
[Channel]>Attribute "Pan" At 20
Sets the pan-attributes of current selection to 20
[Channel]>PresetType 2 Thru 9 At Delay 2
Sets individual delay-time of 2 seconds to all attributes but dimmer, for the current selection
[Channel]>Copy Group 4 At 10
Copies Group 4 to Group 10

Reference: Attribute Keyword

Attribute is an object-type used to reference attributes of a fixture

Syntax

Attribute [PresetType].[Feature].[Attribute]

Attribute "Name"

Attribute [Feature].[Attribute]

Attribute [Attribute]

The default function for attributes is Call. Calling attributes will bring them to the encoder, and select them in the fixturesheet (blue column-header)

An Attribute's numerical ID is a hierarchical triplet (3 numbers seperated by a dot). If only two, or one number is supplied, you are calling attributes of current PresetType or of current Feature.

Example:

[Channel]>Off Attribute 3.2.3
Knocks the attribute Gobo2-Mode out of the programmer, for current selection
[Channel]>Attribute "pan" At 120
Sets attribute "pan" to 120 degrees for the current selection
[Channel]>Attribute 3.1
Calls the first Attribute of the third Feature of the current PresetType
[Channel]>Attribute 3
Calls the third Attributes of the current Feature

Reference: Backup Keyword

Backup is a function used to open/close the Backup Menu window

Syntax

Backup

Reference: Bitmap Keyword

Bitmap is an object-type that generates attribute-values from an animated image

Syntax

Bitmap [ID]

Bitmap [Bitmap-pool].[ID]

Example:

Reference: Black Keyword

Black is a function used to temporary over-ride masterlevel to zero on executing objects

Syntax

Black [Executor-list]

Black On [Executor-list]

Black Off [Executor-list]

When the Black function is used with an Executor button, the Black On command is executed when the button is pressed and the Black Off is executed when the button is released.

Example:

[Channel]>Black On Executor 1
Over-rides masterlevel of Executor 1 to zero
[Channel]>Black OffExecutor 1
Returns masterlevel of Executor 1 to the masterfader

Reference: Blackout Keyword

Blackout is a function used to force zero values on output for dimmer parameter of channels and fixtures. Fixtures with "Master OFF" in the fixture edit menu do not react to Blackout.

Syntax

Blackout

Blackout On

Blackout Off

Blackout is a toggle function. This means that entering Blackout without any helping keyword will toggle Blackout-mode on/off.

Example:

[Channel]>Blackout On
Turns on Blackout-mode
:Processed: Blackout On
Commandline response

Reference: Blind Keyword

Blind is a function that is supressing the output of the live -programmer. Programming is possible without a live - output. After switching off the bling mode, live programmer is back including changes made during bling mode.

Syntax

Blind

Blind On

Blind Off

Blind is a toggle function. This means that entering Blind without any helping keyword will toggle Blind-mode on/off.

Example:

[Channel]>Blind On
Turns on Blind-mode (turns off output of programmer)

Reference: BlindEdit Keyword

BlindEdit is a function used to switch the console between the Live and the Blind programmer

Syntax

BlindEdit

BlindEdit On

BlindEdit Off

BlindEdit is a toggle function. This means that entering BlindEdit without any helping keyword will toggle between the Live and the Blind programmer .

Example:

[Channel]>BlindEdit On
Turns BlindEdit On, opens the Blind Programmer

Reference: Block Keyword

Block is a function used to add data to prevent tracking. Tracking values (magenta colored) are converted to stored values (white colored).

Syntax

Block [Object-list] If [Selection-list] If [Attribute-list]

If the Object-list does not contain any references to any cues, the Block function is applied to the current Cue of the Selected executor.

If syntax does not contain any Selection-list filter, all fixtures will be used

If syntax does not contain any Attribute-list filter, all attributes will be used

Example:

[Channel]> Block
Blocks all parameters in current cue
[Channel]>Block Cue 5 If Fixture 4 If Feature "Position"
Blocks pan and tilt of Fixture 4 in Cue 5

Reference: ButtonPage Keyword

ButtonPage is an object-type representing the Button-Executor part of a Page

Syntax

ButtonPage [ID]

ButtonPage [Pagepool].[ID]

The default function for this object is Call. Calling a ButtonPage will change your physical executors to that page.

If you apply a function not supported by the ButtonPage object, the function will be passed on to the Executor child objects of the ButtonPage.

The ButtonPage keyword currently only supports its default-function Call

Example:

[Channel]>ButtonPage 5
Changes your physical Button-Executors to Page 5

Reference: Call Keyword

Call is a function used to apply/engage an object or its content (press 2x button "ON").

Syntax

Call [Object-list]

If the Call function is used on objects that contains parameters (fixture values) these values will be loaded (added) into the programmer. If Call is used on other object-types, their content will be applied in its context.

Example:

[Channel]>CallPreset 3.1
loads the content of Preset 3.1 into programmer, without selecting the fixtures. At universal presets all fixtures supporting this attributes are affected.
[Channel]>Call Sequence 1
Status of the last cue of sequence 1 is loaded into the programmer without selecting the fixtures.

Reference: Channel Keyword

Channel is an object-type used to access fixtures with a Channel-ID

Syntax

Channel [ID]

Channel [ID].[Sub-ID]

The default function for channel objects is SelFix. This means that entering channels without any function specified will select the channels in programmer.

Example:

[Channel]>Channel 34
Selects Channel 34
[Channel]>Channel 11.5
Selects the fifth subfixture of the fixture Channel 11
[Channel]>Channel 11
Selects all subfixtures of the fixture Channel 11

Reference: ChangeDest(CD) Keyword

CD is a function used to change the destination of your commandline

Syntax

CD [Element-index]

CD "Element name"

CD [Object-type] [Object-ID]

CD ..

CD /

Changing the destination is done by drilling down thru a tree-structured database. Do display the elements at a given destination use the function List .

Example:

[Channel]>CD 3
Enters the 3rd element of the current destination:
Settings>
[Channel]>CD "Edit Setup"
Enters the element of the current destination named "Edit Setup":
Edit Setup>
[Channel]>CD Group
Enters the predefined destination Groups:
Groups/Global>
Edit Setup/Universes>CD ..
Exits one level up in the tree-structure:
Edit Setup>
Edit Setup/Universes>CD /
Exits all levels up the root (no destination):
[Channel]>

Reference: ChannelFader Keyword

ChannelFader is an object-type representing a fader of the ChannelPages

Syntax

ChannelFader [ID]

ChannelFader [Page].[ID]

The default function for ChannelFader is Call. Calling a ChannelFader will change the Executor Faders to Channel-mode.

Example:

[Channel]>Assign Fixture 301At ChannelFader 5
Assigns the dimmer of fixture 301 to fader 5 of the current channelpage
[Channel]>Assign Channel201 Thru 215At ChannelFader 2.1
Assigns Channel 201 thru 215 to fader 1 thru 15 of channelpage 2
[Channel]>Assign Fixture3.2.1 At ChannelFader 2.11
Assigns the first attribute of the second subfixture of Fixture 3 to fader 11 of channelpage 2

Reference: ChannelPage Keyword

ChannelPage is an object-type representing a page of channelfaders

Syntax

ChannelPage [ID]

The default function for ChannelPage is Call. Calling a ChannelPage will change the Executor Faders to Channel-mode.

Example:

[Channel]>ChannelPage 5
Changes your physical Faders to ChannelPage 5
[Channel]>ChannelPage +
Changes your physical Faders to next ChannelPage
[Channel]>DeleteChannelPage2
Deletes ChannelPage 2

Reference: CircularCopy Keyword

CircularCopy is a function used to move attribute-values within your current selection.

Syntax

CircularCopy [offset]

CircularCopy will move the attributevalues within your currently selected fixtures, according to selection-order

This function obeys the Attribute/At-filter

Example:

[Channel]> CircularCopy 1
Fixture 1 copies its values to fixture 2, fixture 2 to fixture 3 etc, back to fixture 1
[Channel]> CircularCopy -2
Fixture 4 copies its values to fixture 2, fixture 3 to fixture 1 etc, back to fixture 4

Reference: Clear Keyword

Clear is a function used to clear selection, active or programmer.

Syntax

Clear

Clear is a function used to clear selection, active, or programmer.

Depending on status of the programmer the function will sequentially:

  1. Clear Selection (unselect all fixtures)
  2. Clear Active (deactivate all values)
  3. Clear All (empty programmer)

Example:

[Channel]> Clear
Clears Selection, Active or Programmer depending on the status/content of the programmer

Reference: ClearActive Keyword

ClearActive is a function used to unactivate all values in programmer

Syntax

ClearActive

The ClearActive function will unactivate any active values in the programmer.

Reference: ClearAll Keyword

ClearAll is a function used to empty the programmer completely

Syntax

ClearAll

The ClearAll function will clear the selection and discard all values in the programmer.

Reference: ClearSelection Keyword

ClearSelection is a function used to deselect any selected fixtures

Syntax

ClearSelection

The ClearSelection function will clear the selection (deselect all fixtures).

Reference: Clone Keyword

Clone is a function used to batchcopy data between fixtures in the showfile

Syntax

Clone [Source Selection-list] At [Destination Selection-list]

Clone [Source Selection-list] At [Destination Selection-list] If [Scope Object-list]

Copies data from source fixtures to destination fixtures throughout the showfile, however by the use of the helping keyword If, the scope of the cloning may be limited to only parts of your showfile.

By default the cloning is done with a low priority, which means that wherever the destination fixtures already contains data, this will be preserved, the data from the source fixtures is just added the places where data doesn't exist.

With the option /merge (or /m), new data from source is merged on top of the original data.

With the option /overwrite (or /o), original data of the destination is removed and replaced by new data

Clone will obey Worlds, and not change data outside your current World, however you may use fixtures outside your world as clone-source.

Whenever cloning with a limited scope, the console will automatically clone dependencies (e.g. presets and effects referenced by the cloned sequence). These dependecies will be cloned with the default low priority clone-option, to protect existing data.

Example:

[Channel]>Clone Fixture 1 At Fixture 2 /overwrite
Fixture 2 will do exactly the same as Fixture 1 did
[Channel]>Clone Fixture 1 At Fixture 2 /merge
Fixture 2 will do the same as Fixture 1 did, but possibly also some of what it did earlier
[Channel]>Clone Fixture 1 At Fixture 2
Fixture 2 will do the same as earlier, but possibly also some of what fixture 1 did
[Channel]>Clone Fixture 1 + 2 AtGroup 10 IfSequence 1 Thru 10
Copies data from Fixture 1 and 2 to fixtures in Group 10, within sequence 1 thru 10 only

Reference: CmdDelay Keyword

CmdDelay is a helping keyword used to indicate delay-times for the Cmd-link

Syntax

CmdDelay [Value-list]

As a helping keyword to programming functions (e.g. Store), this keyword will set the cmddelaytime of the object in question

Example:

[Channel]>Store Cue 3 CmdDelay 4
Creates cue 3 and sets its cmddelaytime to 4 seconds

Reference: CmdHelp Keyword

CmdHelp is a function used to List all keywords in the Commandline Response Window

Syntax

CmdHelp [filter]

This function will list all keyword, with their shortets notation in green.

Example:

[Channel]> CmdHelp
Lists all keywords
[Channel]>CmdHelp f*
Lists all keywords starting with f

Reference: Copy Keyword

Copy is a function used to create copies of an object

Syntax

Copy [Object] At [target-ID]

Copy [Object-list] At [target-start]

Copy [Object] At [target-list]

Copy [Object-list]

If no object-type is given and the commandline-destination is root (no destination) the default object-type for this function, Cue, will be used

If no target is given, the objects will be exported to clipboard.xml, for later to be used with the keyword Paste

Example:

[Channel]>Copy Group 1 At 5
Copies group 1 to group 5
[Channel]>Copy Group 1 Thru 3At 11
Copies group 1 to group 11, group 2 to group 12 and group 3 to group 13
[Channel]>Copy Group 2 At 6 Thru 8
Copies group 2 to group 6, 7 and 8
[Channel]>Copy 2 At 6
Copies cue 2 to cue 6
Macros/Global >Copy 2 At 6
Copies macro 2 to macro 6
[Channel]>Copy Cue 5
Exports cue 5 to the temporary xml-file clipboard.xml

Reference: CrashLogCopy Keyword

CrashLogCopy is a function used to copy crashlog-files from the internal drive to USB

Syntax

CrashLogCopy

Example:

[Channel]>CrashLogCopy
If there are any crashlogsfiles on the internal drive, these are copied to the first USB-stick

Reference: CrashLogDelete Keyword

CrashLogDelete is a function used to delete crashlog-files on the internal drive

Syntax

CrashLogDelete

Example:

[Channel]>CrashLogDelete
If there are any crashlogsfiles on the internal drive, these are deleted

Reference: CrashLogList Keyword

CrashLogList is a function used to list existing crashlog-files in Commandline Response window

Syntax

CrashLogList

Example:

[Channel]>CrashLogList
If there are any crashlogsfiles, these are listed in the commandline response window

Reference: Crossfade Keyword

Crossfade is an assignable function for executors

Syntax

Assign Crossfade (At) [Executor-list]

Crossfade is a function that will gradually activate the next step of an executor, according to the position of the fader

Example:

[Channel]> Assign Crossfade At Executor 1 Thru 5
Gives fader 1 thru 5 Crossfade-functionallity

Reference: CrossfadeA Keyword

CrossfadeA is an assignable function for executors

Syntax

Assign CrossfadeA (At) [Executor-list]

CrossfadeA is a function that will gradually fade down dimmer-attributes of the current step of an executor, according to the position of the fader.

Depending on the Executor option AB/Split, this function will (for dimmer-attributes) either act as a crossfader for decreasing values or as a master for current cue.

Example: